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Posted at 5:09 PM ET, 02/23/2011

Facebook breakup notifier shut down? Heartbreaking!

By Melissa Bell

breakup.JPG

Only this Monday, the Facebook Breakup notifier hit the Internet much to the sadistic glee of spurned lovers everywhere. More than three million people signed up for the application, but the affair was short-lived. Facebook broke up with the Breakup notifier.

"Hey everyone, Facebook e-mailed saying that they've disabled us... We are working for a fix, but ask @facebook to put is back online!" the Twitter feed for the program read Wednesday afternoon.

Facebook sent an e-mail notifying the company it would be shutting down the application because it appeared to be a "spammy application," TechCrunch reports. The message from Facebook read:

To ensure positive user experiences on Platform, we run routine automated screens that take user feedback, machine learning and various algorithms into account and remove spammy applications. For example, if an application is making an inordinate number of stream.publish calls and receiving a large number of user reports, it may be removed by our automated systems to protect the user experience and the Platform ecosystem.

The notifier allowed users to list their crushes in their friend list. When one of those people's relationship status changed, an e-mail was quickly sent off letting the would-be lover know that the time was ripe to send a friendly poke. It took Facebook stalking to a whole new level, as my colleague Hayley Tsukayama wrote on Monday.

Dan Loewenherz created the program after listening to his fiancée and her mother try to play matchmaker for a friend only to discover on Facebook that the man in question was in a relationship. He put his developing skills to task and created the app in a day.

Facebook has not commented on the shutdown, but the Loewenherz hopes to mend fences with Facebook and get his program back online.

Here's hoping this is one relationship that works out.

By Melissa Bell  | February 23, 2011; 5:09 PM ET
Categories:  The Daily Catch  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: President Obama drops DOMA defense: Internet reactions
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Comments

I personally didn't get the big deal behind the sort of negative press the app got besides some reports that it didn't work very well.

From what I heard, all it did was gather public information from people users were already connected with (i.e. information they had access to) and put it in one place. What's the big deal?

And Facebook seemed awfully vague in its reasoning behind shutting it down. They never appeared to come out and say the app was distributing spam. Ah well. More in my blog.. http://bit.ly/gkg4vh

Posted by: willC7 | February 24, 2011 11:26 AM | Report abuse

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