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Posted at 2:13 PM ET, 02/ 8/2011

How to say Google in 23 languages

By Melissa Bell

gogol.jpg

There are about 7,000 languages around the world. That means hundreds of thousands of conversations lost, slammed up against the barrier of language. Words unspoken. Meanings lost.

Now, Google is offering up an application that could break through that wall of sound: the Google Translate app for iPhone.

It is a free application that allows you to speak a phrase and it will respond in a translated language. Imagine that. You are standing on a street corner lost in Bolivia. You say, "Where is the library?" The phone responds in Spanish, "¿Dónde está la biblioteca?" A kind Bolivian points out the way.

The Android phone has had a similar application for about a month now, and the quick transition to an iPhone app shows that the relationship between Google and Apple is thawing.

As of now, the app only offers spoken translation in 23 languages. Out of 7,000 that might seem like a small drop in the pond. But it's a start. As The Post's T.J. Ortenzi told me upon testing this out: "We live in the future and it is amazing."

By Melissa Bell  | February 8, 2011; 2:13 PM ET
Categories:  The Daily Catch  
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