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Posted at 8:45 AM ET, 02/ 3/2011

Packer vs. Steeler speak: How to talk Super Bowl

By Jane Elizabeth and Ana Upton
australia floods
On left: Pittsburgh Steelers fan; On right: Green Bay Packers fan (Left: Gene J. Puskar/Right: Doug Pensinger)

If you run into a transplanted Pittsburgher or Wisconsinite in a bar this weekend, speaking the language of football isn't going to be enough. Not with these two heartland powerhouses, who just might present the most confounding Super Bowl matchup ever, linguistically speaking.

Not to worry. Slip this handy dictionary into your pocket or save it on your smartphone for your trip to cheesehead fave hangout Hawk and Dove or the ex-pat yinzers' Mighty Pint this weekend.

And read on for how you can show off your own Steelers vs. Packers lexicology -- using your best Pittsburgh/Wisconsin accents.

First, a Pittsburgh glossary:

aht:: Out. "You're aht of Arn City? Get aht!"

Arn City: Iron City beer, brewed in Pittsburgh. Marginally better than drinking directly from the Mawn (Monongahela River). Goes well with chipped-chopped ham sammitches (processed ham, sliced thin and piled up on bread) and some types of crew-sants (croissants.)

dahntahn: The other side of Uptown.

dittent: Did you bet on Green Bay? No, you dittent!

gumbands: Rubber bands.

jaggin: To annoy or bother. Quit jaggin me about how I talk!

keller: The Pittsburgh Steelers' uniform kellers are black and gold.

nebby: Nosy.

Picksburg Stillers: The Pittsburgh Steelers. Pittsburghers are unable or unwilling to pronounce the long "e" sound. Remember that, and you're pretty much bilingual.

redd up: Fix up, clean up. Redd up the house; company's comin!

slippy: What the field will be if Dallas ices over on Sunday.

yinz: Western Pennsylvania's equivalent of y'all. Native Pittsburghers are known as yinzers. Also acceptable: yunz.


And now, a translation of common Wisconsin words and phrases:

side-by-each: If you hear "we were up at the bar side-by-each" this means "we were sitting next to each other at the bar."

braht: Bratwurst, or brats, but pronounced bra + t. "What's for dinner (lunch)?" "Curds and brats."

curds: The most delightful cheesy nugget of love you could ever deep-fry. Sentence: "You want some curds with that bra-t?" "Oh ya-der hey."

Ya-der hey: An affirmative, or, yeah.

So-dah: Not pop, not Coke. So-dah.

Were you born in a barn? Translation: "Close the friggin door!"

Borrow me: "Can you borrow me your chairs fer da game?" Not "lend me." Borrow me.

Yous: You, or you all. (See "yinz" above.)

Uff-da: Meaning "oh boy" or "yay." If Clay Matthews hammers Big Ben, a Packer fan may comment: "UFF DA!"

Unthaw: Thaw out. "Did you unthaw after the game?"

En so?: Right? or "Don't you think?" As in: "hearing all this Green Bay talk makes ya homesick, en so?"



Yous got something to say? Get aht! Give us your best Pittsburgh or Wisconsin accent and lingo. Call 1-888-279-7678 and press 11 to leave your brief recording. We'll post 'em on BlogPost before the big game.



Jane Elizabeth, senior web editor at The Washington Post, is a former Pittsburgh resident. Ana Upton of Yorktown, a staffer for The Virginian-Pilot, is a Green Bay native.

By Jane Elizabeth and Ana Upton  | February 3, 2011; 8:45 AM ET
Categories:  What the Post?  | Tags:  super bowl  
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Comments

Regarding a few of the Wisconsin words: I think some of these words apply only to the Green Bay area. I grew up in Antigo and went to college in La Crosse and wouldn't be caught dead using the word "yous." Also we always said "pop" for soda along with my friends in Madison. However, I know people in Milwaukee that say "soda." We never said "borrow me" either. It was always can I borrow.
But there is one word missing and after 30 years of living in the D.C. area I still can't stop using it and it's "bubbler," meaning water fountain or drinking fountain. That word was ingrained in me from birth.

Posted by: missingwisc | February 3, 2011 3:07 PM | Report abuse

In DC you say "chip chopped hame," but in Pittsburgh it is just "chipped ham."

http://english.cmu.edu/pittsburghspeech/dictionary.html

Posted by: BurfordHolly | February 4, 2011 12:51 AM | Report abuse

Here's one for you: "snaht" as in "The Steelers defense will beat the snaht out of Aaron Rodgers."

I find the purported Wisconsin slang to be more Canadian than uniquely Green Bay. "Yous" is Brooklyn. And who doesn't say "Were you born in a barn?"

Frankly I think you're stretching the concept of lingo to make it appear that Wisconsin has something as culturally unique as Pittsburgh to offer in terms of language. En so?

I'd stick with the cheese angle if I were you. Steel meets cheddar. Shred the Packers!

Posted by: trippin | February 4, 2011 7:07 AM | Report abuse


OBAMA = STALIN = BUSH….WHO, WHY, AND HOW RUINED YOU…FROM 911 TO AUSTRALIAN FLOODS – ARIZONA SHOOTING – WIKILEAKS = CIA - ESKIMO SARAH PALIN'S "BRIDGE TO NOWHERE" -- BREAST FEEDING INSANITY -- CIVIL RIOTS IN ARAB COUNTRIES http://avsecbostjan.blogspot.com or http://avsecbostjan.areavoices.com/

OBAMA = STALIN = BUSH….WHO, WHY, AND HOW RUINED YOU…FROM 911 TO AUSTRALIAN FLOODS – ARIZONA SHOOTING – WIKILEAKS = CIA - ESKIMO SARAH PALIN'S "BRIDGE TO NOWHERE" -- BREAST FEEDING INSANITY -- CIVIL RIOTS IN ARAB COUNTRIES http://avsecbostjan.blogspot.com or http://avsecbostjan.areavoices.com/

Posted by: avser | February 4, 2011 9:27 AM | Report abuse

After the game, all the Steelers will take a "shar"

Posted by: BurfordHolly | February 4, 2011 10:04 AM | Report abuse

That's right -- speak dat Pittsburghese!! LOL Too funny!

HERE WE GO STEELERS HERE WE GO PITTSBURGH'S GONNA WIN THE SUPER BOWL!!!!!!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJSrcov7yPk

Posted by: CourtneyLynn28 | February 6, 2011 10:04 AM | Report abuse

I was born and grew up in Pittsburgh and I only heard someone say "soda" once. A true resident of da Burgh know that you say pop. Its even defined by Carnegie Mellon University's Pittsburgh Speech dictionary as "Pop".

http://english.cmu.edu/pittsburghspeech/dictionary.html

Posted by: danbaker94 | February 6, 2011 10:11 AM | Report abuse

Rapist Roth team vs. pathetic Brett team. The best thing about the revolution in Egypt is that the S. Bowl has received much less media hype than usual.

Posted by: mirrorgazer | February 6, 2011 2:21 PM | Report abuse

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