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Posted at 10:01 AM ET, 02/22/2011

Libya reports filter out despite Internet clampdown (Live updates)

By Melissa Bell
libya protests
Residents stand on a tank holding a pre-Gaddafi-era national flag inside a security forces compound in Benghazi, Libya, on Monday. (Alaguri/AP)

As Libya revolts against the government of Moammar Gaddafi, reports from the African country have been few, in part because Western reporters have only just reached the country, but also because access to the Internet has been sporadic at best. As with Egypt, technology has allowed work-around solutions for Libyans to access the Internet through dial-up connections and other ISPs.

Two messages have been passed around on social networks, "Please pass on to any Libyan contacts: Codes to open Facebook or Twitter or Google. Type the following in browser address bar: * For Facebook: 69.63.189.34 *For Twitter: 128.242.240.52 *For Google: 72.14.204.99" and "XS4ALL, a fantastic, hacker-friendly ISP in the Netherlands, has thrown open all its modem lines for free use by people in Libya when and if their network access gets blocked by the government. DPCosta sez, 'It's expensive (international call), but can be very handy in an emergency. The number is +31205350535 and the username/password are xs4all.' "

I've compiled a Twitter list of Libyans anonymously reporting from within the country and others following the events closely from abroad. The tweets cannot be confirmed, but they give a good sense of the events on the ground:

By Melissa Bell  | February 22, 2011; 10:01 AM ET
Categories:  The Daily Catch  
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