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Posted at 8:34 AM ET, 03/ 2/2011

♪♫ Dr. Seuss's birthday celebrated by Michelle Obama, schoolchildren across America

By Melissa Bell
dr seuss
The 100th anniversary Theodor Seuss Geisel commemorative postage stamp.

The words of Theodor Seuss Geisel thrill and delight like few other children's tales. His universe -- a kaleidoscope-colored wonderland -- lets cats in hats cause mayhem, loyal elephants hatch eggs and mysterious creatures call Loraxes fight environmental ruin.

In his 48 books, he tied up tidy moral lessons in bright, ridiculous packaging. Rather than extolling on the virtues of experimentation, he offered up a plate of "Green Eggs and Ham" so many times his character finally relented and learned to love it. Instead of praising the spirit of Christmas, he sent in a Grinch to steal it, only to let his readers learn by the end of the book that the holiday has the power to melt even the coldest of hearts.

He was a magician, a poet, a Pied Piper of the imagination. Wednesday marks the 107th anniversary of his birth. In celebration of the children's author, 14 years ago, the day was designated the "Read Across America Day." Michelle Obama read Seuss classics at the Library of Congress, and smaller readings took place across the country.

Here's to Dr. Seuss. Thank you for making my childhood richer. If you've been without Dr. Seuss in your life for some time, just listen to his book, "Oh, the Places You'll Go!" No matter the age, it's always the right time to hear it.

"Oh, the places you'll go! There is fun to be done!/There are points to be scored. there are games to be won./And the magical things you can do with that ball/will make you the winning-est winner of all."

By Melissa Bell  | March 2, 2011; 8:34 AM ET
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Comments

You know, I did not grow up with Dr. Seuss books except a hand-me-down copy of "And to think that I saw it on Mulberry Street," which I absolutely loved. But I just bought a collection of Seuss books for my son to open his mind, and he absolutely loves it. (This also explains the book fair at my son's school today. I did not realize what today was until just now.) My son's favorites are The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham, and The Lorax.

Posted by: forgetthis | March 2, 2011 9:42 AM | Report abuse

Here we go, go, go, go, on an adventure! There is a Cat in the Hat maraton on PBS....

Posted by: ozpunk | March 2, 2011 9:48 AM | Report abuse

who does michelle think she is promoting this author?! telling us what to feed our children wasn't enough, so now she wants us what to feed our childrens' minds??!!??
she is obviously a nazo-facist-socialist-commie who is trying to tear down the US from the inside out and further her islamo-dominated world view.
the only recourse we have is to obviously engage in open revolt.

Posted by: funkey | March 2, 2011 10:17 AM | Report abuse

2 nights ago, my daughter read her 500th book for this school year (she's 8).

It was The Cat In the Hat.

It was the same book my mother used to read to me 40 years ago. The exact same book. (the same copy)

I wrote a tribute to Dr. Seuss, of course in rhyme. If anyone wants it they can download it for free (no email required).

Jeff
www.theBirthdayQuestions.com

http://www.thebirthdayquestions.com/2011/03/happy-birthday-dr-seuss-said-of-course-in-rhyme/

Posted by: theBirthdayQuestions | March 2, 2011 10:27 AM | Report abuse

Even now, at 31, Dr. Seuss's books still hold as much magic for me as they did when I was a child. It's wonderful to share my favorites with my son. He brought his favorite, The Sneetches and Other Stories, to school today for their Dr. Seuss reading day. The school let the kids wear their pajamas for the occasion and he was thrilled to wear his Thing 1 and Thing 2 pajamas. Last weekend we saw a high school production of Seussical the Musical and the wonder in his eyes as he saw his favorites brought to life was priceless! Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss!

P.S. For grown-ups, check out the Secret Art of Dr. Seuss. It's an amazing book filled with pictures of his paintings and other artwork.

Posted by: camdencyclist | March 2, 2011 10:36 AM | Report abuse

Dr. Seuss is completely underrated as a modern-day Aesop, thanks for touching on that aspect of his writing. Stories like The Sneetches (discrimination), The Butter Battle Book (international arms races), The Lorax (Environmentalism), What Was I Scared Of? (tolerance), The Zax (pragmatism), Horton Hears A Who (organizing, NOT abortion), and I Had Trouble Getting to Solla-Sollew (adversity), contain strong moral messages in their simple tales that are always appropriate.

Posted by: Section506 | March 2, 2011 3:03 PM | Report abuse

Piffle! Green Eggs and ham is about breath control.

My kids always wondered if I would get the whole last run through, "Say, I do so like green eggs and ham, Thank You, thank you Sam I Am" done in just one breath.

Of course I always did, but had to at least make it look hard

Posted by: ceflynline | March 2, 2011 9:47 PM | Report abuse

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