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Posted at 1:48 PM ET, 11/29/2010

And many miles before I sleep...

By Evan Bliss

Blegh. Finding a hair in your food, cable going in and out, your CD skipping on your favorite song, all pretty much sum up this season. It hasn’t been terrible, but it’s been far from good. Anything should be better than last year, but only winning four games in a season is something a good franchise should never endure. With five games left and playoff hopes on par with me winning a Vegas Hold ’Em tournament, there are still some things I’d like to see happen before 2010 is merely a historical reference.

Split with the Giants. They’ve won four straight against the Redskins, a wound that needs to heal before it gets infected. It’d be nice to knock that stupid look off Eli’s face, but I’m pretty sure that’s how he looks all the time.

Creativity on offense: Davis and Cooley on the field at the same time creating mis-matches. I liked seeing Brandon Banks run the Wildcat formation, what do they have to lose? Why not throw Albert Haynesworth in at fullback and Lorenzo Alexander at running back? Run the college option with Banks and Williams or Torain if he gets healthy. Hunter Smith at quarterback?

Ten-and-6 is overly optimistic even by my standards, 9-7 is even partially insane considering the schedule ahead -- 8-8 is difficult, but doable. Eight-and-8 on the year would give me enough to think progress occurred this season and we had the right people in place moving forwards. Seven-and-9 would be tolerable but annoying, as a losing record always is, but double-digit losses again would be more than disappointing.

Beating Dallas. Nothing wrong with kicking a Dallas when it's down. Sweeping Dallas would be a huge plus this year. In fact, at times sweeping Dallas makes everything better. A 2-14 season would feel like an 8-8 season if both those wins were against Dallas. I’d be fine with a 7-9 record with a sweep over Dallas.

More discipline. Stop beating yourselves. Perry Riley stop trying to fit in! Just because there are so many members of the Dumb Penalty Club (DPC) doesn’t mean you should try to join. But congratulations, you might now be the President of the DPC. Even with Brandon Banks getting another called back, he’s still one of the lone bright spots this season.

A receiver stepping up for good. Maybe Santana’s been dropping so many balls because the weight on his shoulders is finally affecting effecting his hands. For too long he’s been the only viable deep threat, but his strength has always been in the slot. Get him the ball quickly and let him make plays with his feet.  Armstrong shows potential, but needs to be an every down threat. Malcolm Kelly’s hamstring is hopefully getting fresher than Devin Thomas’ old playbook.

Except for the lowly Cowpies, the Redskins' remaining opponents are all in a position to make the playoffs. If you can’t make the playoffs yourself, the next best thing is ending another team’s playoff aspirations. Misery loves company!

By Evan Bliss  | November 29, 2010; 1:48 PM ET
Categories:  Evan Bliss, Redskins  | Tags:  Evan Bliss, Redskins  
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Next: A parable about Ben Olsen

Comments

Hey, Evan...if you are going to be a blogger for the Washington Post, you might study the rules of grammar and attempt to set a good example as a writer associated with such a prestigious organization. The burden of all those catches are "AFFECTING" Santana's hands, not "effecting" them.

Just because you aren't getting paid for this gig doesn't mean you shouldn't act like a professional.

Sloppy work.

Posted by: mommyskinsfan | November 29, 2010 9:06 PM | Report abuse

Hey, mommyskinsfan...if you are going to be the grammar police for a blogger for the Washington Post, you might study the rules of grammar and attempt to set a good example as a self-selected editor associated with such a prestigious organization. The burden of all those catches IS "AFFECTING" Santana's hands, not "effecting" them.
"Burden" is the subject of the sentence and is singular, so your verb, "is," must be singular as well. Just because you aren't getting paid for this gig doesn't mean you shouldn't act like a professional.
Sloppy work.

Posted by: huskylove | November 29, 2010 11:47 PM | Report abuse

"blogger defender" - you are simply wrong. And I'm not a self- appointed editor. Just a reader with standards.

Posted by: mommyskinsfan | November 30, 2010 12:48 PM | Report abuse

I am not arguing that Mr. Bliss was correct in his employment of "effecting"; he was not. Instead, I am quibbling with your subject-verb agreement.

I am wondering where I am wrong on this. Let me explain my reasoning to you. The sentence [with your correction] is:

The burden of all those catches [verb] affecting Santana's hands.

While the complete subject is "The burden of all those catches," the simple subject is "The burden." "of all those catches" is a prepositional phrase acting as an adjective to identify which burden. Removing the prepositional phrase is usually the quickest way to clear up any confusion. With the phrase removed, the sentence would read "The burden is affecting Santana's hands."

The More You Know!

Posted by: huskylove | November 30, 2010 3:13 PM | Report abuse

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