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Nationals' new duds a dud

By Ryan Korby

Those are some nice new batting practice jerseys the Nationals unveiled last night. Wait, what? Those are their new game jerseys? Send them back, send them back! As ugly as the 2010 version of the Nats jerseys were, these new ones are as much of a joke as the “fashion show” the organization had to show them off. If you haven’t seen the abominations in red, white and blue yet, you can see them here. The new game day duds honestly look like the batting practice jerseys the team wore this past year, just replace an interlocking “DC” with a curly “W.”

Unfortunately, the new uniforms are just another episode for the team that proves we need a baseball edition of “What Not to Wear.”  The old home threads, when “Nationals” was spelled correctly, reminded me of something a team from Greenville, NC or Birmingham, AL might wear, not a major league caliber team. The best uniforms in baseball have continuity and an understated, classic look. The block font and multiple-outlined letters of the old home uniforms looked tacky and clownish.

The oversized “W” on the new jersey stays with that under-the-big top theme and three uniform changes in five years is the opposite of continuous.

I think the worst part is that until 7 p.m. last night I was excited that the new jersey might be an improvement. I was hoping we could put the farm team jerseys of years past behind us and make people forget gaffes like the “Natinals” situation. I was hoping for uniforms that looked traditional to reflect the rich baseball history in our Nation’s capital. The team got the hats right from the beginning by borrowing the old Senators logo. Why not copy the Senators’ jerseys from the Ted Williams managerial era, too? That’s essentially what the gray away jerseys were this past year, and they looked great!

Apparently, the team thought the gray aways were awesome as well, because they didn’t make any changes to them, only the home unis, which they still can’t seem to get right. The Nationals could’ve saved a lot of money if they had just consulted me on the home uniforms. I would’ve taken 10 minutes and probably a tenth of the price to re-design the home jerseys: take the gray aways, make them white, and replace “Washington” with “Nationals” written in the same script font. Done. Want an alternate jersey? Take the home jersey I just designed and make it red.  

Given the organization’s fashion sense, I completely expect another redesign next season. Oh, the jerseys will stay the same, but I’m expecting the Lerners to make the team play in Apollo Creed-style American flag pants.

By Ryan Korby  | November 11, 2010; 11:59 AM ET
Categories:  Nationals, Ryan Korby  | Tags:  Nationals, Ryan Korby  
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Comments

I must say that as long as they play well, do we really care what they wear?

Although I like the idea about the Apollo Creed-style American flag pants. Now those I think will definitely help! :-)

Posted by: Doctorness | November 11, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

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