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Pencil boxes: Prepare to welcome liquid graphite

College 101 - Beer Pong.jpgJeez, remember when mechanical pencils were all the rage for being new and cool and innovative? (So cool that some teachers even outlawed them?)

Well, here's the newest thing from the pencil industry: Sharpie has come up with a "liquid pencil," which will be hitting stores in September and selling for about two bucks.

It looks like a pen and writes like a pen -- but it's filled with liquid graphite and erases like a pencil for up to three days, at which point your thoughts become permanent. Oh, and it doesn't seem to smear.

Liquid Pencil (1).JPG

The liquid pencil is a "No. 2 lead equivalent" but a company spokesman said it hasn't been approved for use on standardized tests. (So, seriously, probably not a great idea to use it on your SAT.)

In a press release, a Sharpie vice president for marketing called the new pencil "a game changer in the back-to-school shopping aisle" because "sharpening standard pencils takes up valuable classroom time, and mechanical pencil leads seem to constantly break."

Oh, and a quick chemistry lesson in how "liquid graphite" works: Graphite particles are dispersed in a pressurized liquid-like medium which carries the particles from the pen to the paper.

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By Jenna Johnson  |  August 10, 2010; 4:20 PM ET
Categories:  College 101  
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