Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
The new Washington
Post Weather website
Jump to CWG's
Latest Full Forecast
Outside now? Radar, temps
and more: Weather Wall
Follow us on Twitter (@capitalweather) and become a fan on Facebook
Posted at 3:15 PM ET, 09/11/2008

PM Update: More Gray Skies Are Coming

By Ian Livingston

Some rain possible Friday; Ike storm surge threatens Tx.

Much like yesterday, clouds of this morning have decreased across much of the area throughout the day providing at least partial sunshine to most locations. Temperatures are mostly in the mid and upper 70s across the area right now and should stay close to where they are before dropping back through the 70s toward the upper 60s this evening. Clouds will tend to increase the rest of the day.

Tonight: Skies will be mostly cloudy overnight as temperatures drop to the low 60s in the suburbs and mid 60s in the city. A light wind will blow from the south or east.

Tomorrow: Friday will be mostly cloudy and slightly below average temperature-wise. Look for the chance of isolated showers throughout the day, with higher odds during the afternoon and evening when a few thunderstorms may pop up as well. Highs should top out in the mid-to-upper 70s.

Ike: Massive Hurricane Ike continues moving toward the upper Texas coast at 10 mph this afternoon with sustained winds of 100 mph and further strengthening expected. National Weather Service warnings in the Houston/Galveston area are becoming direr as the probability of a major storm surge grows:

ENTIRE COASTAL CITIES AND TOWNS WILL BE INUNDATED. PERMANENT BREACHES MAY BE CUT OFF. FULL RECOVERY WILL TAKE MONTHS IF NOT YEARS. WATER LEVELS MAY EXCEED 13 FEET FOR MORE THAN A MILE INLAND. CONDITIONS WILL BE WORSENED BY BATTERING WAVES. SUCH WAVES WILL NOT ONLY EXACERBATE PROPERTY DAMAGE BUT WASH OUT SOLID ROAD AND BRIDGE STRUCTURES. DAMAGE FROM BEACH EROSION WILL TAKE YEARS TO REPAIR.

See Josh's full forecast through the beginning of next week, SkinsCast for the regular season home opener, and also more on Hurricane Ike as it moves through the Gulf of Mexico headed toward Texas.

By Ian Livingston  | September 11, 2008; 3:15 PM ET
Categories:  Forecasts  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Meteorologist: 'Ike is a Freak Storm'
Next: Forecast: A Summery September Weekend

Comments

CWG: How does Ike compare with Hurricane Alicia which hit Galveston/Houston in 1983?

Posted by: Brian in Alex | September 11, 2008 4:56 PM | Report abuse

You know a storm is serious when the government puts out a notice like this... (thanks to LaytonsDan for the quote)

"PERSONS NOT HEEDING EVACUATION ORDERS IN SINGLE FAMILY ONE OR TWO STORY HOMES WILL FACE CERTAIN DEATH."

Posted by: mcleaNed | September 11, 2008 4:58 PM | Report abuse

Wow. Actually does sound very serious. Hope everyone is as safe as they can be.

Looks like we might get some rain out of this next week?

Posted by: Period | September 11, 2008 5:45 PM | Report abuse

GDFL shows Ike reforming over Western New York as a Category 1 Hurricane? WHAT?

http://icons-pe.wunderground.com/data/storm_radar/ike09l.2008091112_anim.gif?cache=174

Posted by: mcleaNed | September 11, 2008 5:46 PM | Report abuse

Can't underestimate the power of those tropical waters of Lake Erie!

Posted by: Jamming | September 11, 2008 5:56 PM | Report abuse

I will ask my question again that was never answered by a professional. Are we likely to get any of the precip from Ike? The models seem to be taking the remnants on a sharp right turn after landfall and then up and over Pennsylvania. Since the storm is so large it would make sense that we would get something.

Posted by: Anonymous | September 11, 2008 6:03 PM | Report abuse

mcleaNed: Oh, didn't you hear? The government recently replaced Western New York with a warm lake, capable of creating inland hurricanes. They felt that they had it too easy with their occasional severe storms and blizzards and such. Hehehe :P In seriousness, the model probably just picked up something or read something strangely, that's all.

That wording still creeps me out. I'd **** a brick and then die of a heart attack if Sterling ever issued ANYTHING that included the phrase "PERSONS...WILL FACE CERTAIN DEATH" in it. Could you imagine? A dusting of snow shuts the area down for the day - could you imagine a hurricane of that intensity, requiring such wording? AHHHH

Posted by: weatherdudeVA | September 11, 2008 6:04 PM | Report abuse

I will ask my question again that was never answered by a professional. Are we likely to get any of the precip from Ike? The models seem to be taking the remnants on a sharp right turn after landfall and then up and over Pennsylvania. Since the storm is so large it would make sense that we would get something.

Posted by: Anonymous | September 11, 2008 6:04 PM | Report abuse

Anonymous: given the speed and variability of Ike's track once it turns Northeast, we could get anything from 2+ inches to sunny skies. Rain certainly isn't out of the question, but it does look like the areas north and west of DC will get it worse.

Posted by: mcleaNed | September 11, 2008 6:11 PM | Report abuse

Brian-- In the post before this -- re: Ike as a "freak" storm, see Rocko's comment. He has a nice comparison between Alicia and "potential" Ike. Bear in mind, exactly where Ike comes ashore will make a HUGE difference with respect to storm surge impacts.

Posted by: Jason, Capital Weather Gang | September 11, 2008 6:14 PM | Report abuse

Anonymous, it's a little too early to say with much confidence whether the metro area will experience much rain from Ike. The current track guidance would suggest we're on the southern edge of Ike's moisture by Monday, but the track could change.

Posted by: Jason, Capital Weather Gang | September 11, 2008 6:22 PM | Report abuse

I'm very concerned about my friends in Texas. But, closer to home, the Washington National Opera has scheduled a live simulcast of La Traviata at Nats Park on Saturday night. How does that look? Thanks.

Posted by: ep | September 11, 2008 7:25 PM | Report abuse

What's the difference between "chief" meteorologist and "lead" meteorologist here at CapWx.

Posted by: Period | September 11, 2008 7:40 PM | Report abuse

Chief meteorologists get gold-plated keyboards. Lead ones have to settle for silver.

Posted by: mcleaNed | September 11, 2008 8:24 PM | Report abuse

mcleaNed: That animation always does strange things once it takes storms inland. It had Hanna become a Cat. 1 over Maine.

Wow... Ike has a HUGE wind field. It is a very strange storm, with a very strange structure. I wonder if Ike will develop an eye and the wind field will compact.

Models take the storm inland near Galveston, and it looks, at this time, as though the remnants will miss Washington.

Posted by: Sterling | September 11, 2008 10:59 PM | Report abuse

Period: There's not much of a difference. Dan and I jointly share responsibility for the content on this blog. My designation as chief is simply due to the fact I founded the blog and have been doing this the longest.

Posted by: Jason, Capital Weather Gang | September 11, 2008 11:59 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2012 The Washington Post Company