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Posted at 3:15 PM ET, 02/19/2009

PM Update: There's a Cold Wind a Blowin'

By Ian Livingston

More blustery conditions expected Friday

* Snow With Sunshine: The Pictures and The Explanation *

Morning clouds and quick-moving showers transitioned to a partly sunny and increasingly windy afternoon today. Gusts over 30 mph from the northwest are now funneling colder air into the region as highs that topped out in the mid-to-upper 40s fall back through the low-to-mid 40s. An isolated shower or flurry is possible through the rest of the afternoon, especially in the northern and western portions of the area.

Temperatures: Current area temperatures. Powered by Weather Bonk. Map by Google. Hover over and click icons for more info. Click and hold on map to pan. Refresh page to update. See map bigger on our Weather Wall.

Tonight: Cold and gusty winds are the stories of the night. Temperatures fall through the 30s as we drift into evening, and look for overnight lows to range from near 20 in the colder suburbs to mid-20s downtown. When a wind blowing 20 to 25 mph and gusting as high as 40 mph is factored in, wind chill readings in the single digits are possible from time to time.

Tomorrow (Friday): Average highs are creeping toward 50 degrees. Tomorrow however will feature more mid-winter values. Mostly sunny skies may make it look nice outside, but winds continuing to gust near 35 mph combined with highs around 35-40 should make for another jacket and scarf type of day.

See Josh Larson's forecast through the beginning of next week.

Winter Cancel? National Airport recorded a trace of snow yesterday and still stands at 2" for a seasonal total. CWG Chief Meteorologist Jason Samenow recently described the sad situation for snow lovers, noting there is still time for a few more inches of the frozen white stuff. With no significant snow threats currently on the horizon, and meteorological winter just days from ending, is it time to consider this one over? Share your thoughts in the comment section.

By Ian Livingston  | February 19, 2009; 3:15 PM ET
Categories:  Forecasts  
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Next: Forecast: A Wind-Chilled Friday; Weekend Flakes?

Comments

very windy in capitol hill...

Posted by: madisondc | February 19, 2009 3:41 PM | Report abuse

I really do believe that we may have one storm of 3+ inches looming. We will have to give a name for the past few years of Snow Drought here in the DC area. I am thinking...

Posted by: stinkerflat1 | February 19, 2009 3:44 PM | Report abuse

Maybe snow droughts aren't that rare. In the early 90s, the Ski Cherokee resort in Linden, VA closed after just two seasons, in part because of a snow drought.

But don't forget it can certainly snow outside of meteorological winter. Is there really a statistically significant difference in the probability for snow on Feb 28th vs March 1?

I predict more snow.

Posted by: spgass1 | February 19, 2009 3:55 PM | Report abuse

I'm thankful for the hopeful comments here. We've already heard from the naysayers (stick a fork in it) earlier this week.

Posted by: manassasmissy | February 19, 2009 4:16 PM | Report abuse

spgass1, I don't think there is much statistical difference between Feb 28 and Mar 1, and of course most folks consider it winter till the official change in March. Occasional CWG contributor Matt Ross compiled a list of March snowfalls at IAD over 1", so more snow is certainly possible into March. We are in the grips of another pretty cold pattern again, but averages are about to go above freezing for lows in DC in a few days and March temperature averages start growing pretty quickly from highs around 50 at the start to over 60 at the end of the month.

Complications from La Nina have been evident again recently with lows tracking to our northwest, and a fast northern jet through the winter has kept many bigger storms from materializing. Given that we are nearing the end of winter it's hard to see major changes, but March can often be volatile with cold air still holding in the north and warm building in the south. Unfortunately, we are probably a little far south to get in on the best March has to offer winter-weather wise. But, there is still some hope out there.

Posted by: Ian-CapitalWeatherGang | February 19, 2009 4:21 PM | Report abuse

Agreed, Ian. Truthfully we have three weeks tops for a reasonable chance of significant snow. After that, it will take some sort of unusual March outlier event, and that gets quite unlikely. Not seeing anything in the long range models to suggest any changes to this pattern anytime soon. So, I sadly vote, put a fork in it is the betting man's wager.

Posted by: curtmccormick | February 19, 2009 4:53 PM | Report abuse

After this weekend's Alberta Clipper, the next chance of snow will be Feb 27-28.

Source:
Hagerstown Almanac

Posted by: spgass1 | February 19, 2009 5:57 PM | Report abuse

Re snow statistics:
Rare events are highly random.

Posted by: CapitalClimate | February 19, 2009 5:59 PM | Report abuse

Three signs of spring are in: Silver maples are blooming, crocuses are starting, and Fat Tuesday [sometimes regarded here as the REAL end of winter because the date varies!] is just around the corner. There's still a week and a half of met. winter.

That said, March can still provide excitement. There's always the chance for a repeat "Superstorm". However, I've always regarded the "Superstorm" as a bust down here in D.C. due to the brief but VERY DISAPPOINTING changeover to sleet/rain at the height of the storm. That six-hour interlude cut our snow totals at DCA drastically and spelled the difference between two days of Federal shutdown and having to report for work on Monday. Generally I don't regard a snowstorm as a "success" unless the Feds shut down for at least a day. They did NOT the Monday after the "Superstorm".

Posted by: Bombo47jea | February 19, 2009 8:26 PM | Report abuse

Outside of a chance of a few flakes this weekend, the rest of Feb. will be snowless. I'll just be happy when the damn wind quits blowing.

Posted by: VaTechBob | February 19, 2009 8:58 PM | Report abuse

Wind chill advisory has been issued for areas west of the Blue Ridge:

"WESTERLY WINDS OF 20 TO 30 MPH WILL COMBINE WITH TEMPERATURES IN THE TEENS OVERNIGHT TO PRODUCE WIND CHILL VALUES BETWEEN 5 AND 10 BELOW.

A WIND CHILL ADVISORY MEANS THAT VERY COLD AIR AND STRONG WINDS WILL COMBINE TO GENERATE LOW WIND CHILLS. THIS WILL RESULT IN FROST BITE AND LEAD TO HYPOTHERMIA IF PRECAUTIONS ARE NOT TAKEN. IF YOU MUST VENTURE OUTDOORS...MAKE SURE YOU WEAR A HAT AND GLOVES."

Posted by: spgass1 | February 19, 2009 10:19 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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