Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
The new Washington
Post Weather website
Jump to CWG's
Latest Full Forecast
Outside now? Radar, temps
and more: Weather Wall
Follow us on Twitter (@capitalweather) and become a fan on Facebook
Posted at 5:06 PM ET, 08/31/2010

Earl update: Hurricane watch for NC Outer Banks

By Jason Samenow

* Hurricane Tracking | Earl Q&A transcript | Reliving Katrina *
* Core of Hurricane Earl still likely to stay offshore *
* PM Forecast Update | Number of 90+ days: 57 (Record: 67, 1980) *

earl-watches.jpg
Pink shaded areas in NC depict hurricane watch; orange shaded areas tropical storm watch. The current position of Earl is shown at the bottom of the map, with extent of hurricane force winds in red, and tropical storm force winds in orange. Source: National Hurricane Center

From the National Hurricane Center:

A HURRICANE WATCH HAS BEEN ISSUED FOR THE EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES FROM NORTH OF SURF CITY NORTH CAROLINA TO THE NORTH CAROLINA VIRGINIA BORDER ... INCLUDING THE PAMLICO AND ALBEMARLE SOUNDS.
A TROPICAL STORM WATCH HAS BEEN ISSUED FROM CAPE FEAR NORTH CAROLINA NORTHEASTWARD TO SURF CITY.

A hurricane and tropical storm watch means that the stated conditions are possible within the next 48 hours for the specified areas. Folks considering a trip to the Outer Banks this weekend should probably hold off until at least late Friday afternoon or Friday night when the storm will have passed and/or until officials have stated it is safe.

As of 5 p.m., Earl was situated about 1,000 miles SSE of Cape Hatteras, NC. It remains a large and intense category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 135 mph. The projected track of Earl has shifted very slightly towards to the coast (to the west) but not enough to be particularly meaningful. It should still stay far enough offshore to spare the VA/MD/DE beaches of a direct hit though dangerous surf, minor tidal flooding, and beach erosion are possible Friday. Refer to Greg's post from earlier for more details about Earl's likely future evolution and possible impacts along the East Coast.

By Jason Samenow  | August 31, 2010; 5:06 PM ET
Categories:  Tropical Weather  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: PM Update: Seventh heat wave of year rolls on
Next: UnitedCast: Summer warmth for semifinal

Comments

Posted by: MindyBlock | August 31, 2010 5:59 PM | Report abuse

Is there any rule of thumb for how long it takes for surf/currents to settle after an event like this? Planning on flying to Kitty Hawk on Sunday and hitting the beach. If the beach is still going to be in rough shape, it would be nice to know before hand.

Posted by: chris_soule | August 31, 2010 6:01 PM | Report abuse

Count on the beach being in rough shape.

Posted by: MKadyman | August 31, 2010 6:31 PM | Report abuse

Heading to Williamsburg Thurs.-Sat. Will the storm affect the weather there then?

Posted by: lshuster1 | August 31, 2010 7:00 PM | Report abuse

Keep in mind there is a 33.3% chance the actual path of Earl will lie outside the NHC cone

Posted by: SteveT-CapitalWeatherGang | August 31, 2010 7:07 PM | Report abuse

What are your thoughts about Earl affecting the US Open over the weekend or the drive from DC to NY on Friday?

Posted by: dbhurwitz | August 31, 2010 8:49 PM | Report abuse

@lshuster1

Just a slight chance of showers and a little wind late Thursday night into Friday. Not expecting major impacts there and you'll be completely in the clear by late Friday afternoon.

@dbhurwitz

NYC could get some gusty showers from Earl on Friday morning into the afternoon. Then it will rapidly clear out for Saturday.

Posted by: Jason-CapitalWeatherGang | August 31, 2010 9:45 PM | Report abuse

Hyde County mandatory evac Ocracoke Island.

Posted by: SPS1 | August 31, 2010 9:47 PM | Report abuse

So what is the likelihood of Earl taking the energy from Fiona or vice versa? Seems like NWS has them nearly side by side in the forecast track at 2 PM on Friday.

Posted by: kridgely | August 31, 2010 9:57 PM | Report abuse

Any estimates on how much tropical moisture and winds will impact some of the VA wine growing areas? Especially interested in Charlottesville and also out west on 66 toward I-81, Linden area.

Earl looks pretty big with both winds and moisture, but also see much of the shear is impacting the outflow side. I am not sure what to think that will mean on the weaker side of the storm as the center tracks up the coast. It is also tough to get a sense of how big of a rainmaker this will be when and where it starts to pick up speed and clear areas fairly quickly.

Any guidance?

Posted by: DCcola | August 31, 2010 10:09 PM | Report abuse

@DCcola

We're thinking minimal (probably no) rain for interior Virginia, unfortunately.

Posted by: Jason-CapitalWeatherGang | August 31, 2010 10:48 PM | Report abuse

I would think vineyards would NOT want rain now, b/c rain during the harvest is not good. Earl NOT dropping rain in the Piedmont is probably a plus for them, whereas the rest of us out here could really use some of that rain ...

Posted by: weathergrrl | August 31, 2010 11:43 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2012 The Washington Post Company