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Posted at 3:30 PM ET, 10/25/2010

PM Update: Muggy with a few showers

By Ian Livingston

Still warm and humid through midweek

* Ice loss = severe winter? | Richard's troubled journey | Tornado video *
* Outside now? Radar, temps, clouds & more: Weather Wall *

It has not felt too much like late October out there today. Warm temperatures and fairly high humidity levels have mixed to create a somewhat muggy one. For the most part, rain of consequence has missed the area so far, but a few showers have passed through and some more rain is possible before the day ends. Temperatures that have risen into the low-and-mid 70s won't be eager to drop overnight thanks to clouds and moisture in the air.


Radar & lightning: Latest D.C. area radar shows movement of precipitation and lightning strikes over past two hours. Refresh page to update. Click here or on image to enlarge. Or see radar bigger on our Weather Wall.

Through Tonight: The risk of showers and maybe a thunderstorm or two continues into the evening, but there probably won't be that widespread of coverage and the risk dwindles as the night progresses. Temperatures fall only to the upper 50s and lower 60s thanks to fairly high dew points and a continued moist flow from the south.

Tomorrow (Tuesday): Another very warm late-October day is ahead. There may be periods of partly sunny skies, but for the most part clouds will dominate. Still, the mild flow continuing from the south should push temperatures to at least the mid-70s most spots. There could be a few showers around during the afternoon, but they should be fairly isolated.

See Jason Samenow's forecast through the week. And if you haven't already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Weathercaster dies: Former D.C. "weather girl" Tippy Stringer Huntley Conrad died earlier this month at her home in Los Angeles, Ca. She was 80 years old. Mrs. Conrad began her career in the area hosting cooking and homemaking shows before transitioning to a weathercaster during the early 1950s. She hosted segments at 6:45 p.m. and 11:10 p.m. She was often joined on-air by a cartoon character she created named Senator Fairweather. Read more about Mrs. Conrad.

By Ian Livingston  | October 25, 2010; 3:30 PM ET
Categories:  Forecasts  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Richard's troublesome tropical journey
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Comments

How dry I am, how dry I am
It's plain to see just why I am
Waiting for rain, what a pain
And that is why so dry I am

Posted by: JerryFloyd1 | October 25, 2010 4:08 PM | Report abuse

Jerry, you made me go flip to the Drought Monitor but things look ok, outside of the WV panhandle area. I like your song though! Let me know if you are seeing any major issues in your neighborhood--lack of rain causing problems?
http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html

Posted by: Camden-CapitalWeatherGang | October 25, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

Camden, I only meant those slightly modified lyrics as commentary on the lack of rain thus far today.

I think ground moisture is OK in D.C. But the rains came a couple of weeks too late to help with the fall color.

(According to Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Near_Future The song "How Dry I Am" dates back to 1919, pre-prohibition lyrics by Irving Berlin. But its antecedents go back even further. I remember the words as a slogan for a baby powder ad when I was a kid.)

Posted by: JerryFloyd1 | October 25, 2010 4:57 PM | Report abuse

Drove from Spotsy. to Blacksburg Sat 4 the Tech-Duke game. The colors were very dull all the way down 81, probably the blandest I can remember in a long time. The hot dry weather really messed up the colors this yr.

Posted by: VaTechBob | October 25, 2010 5:52 PM | Report abuse

Jerry - thanks for conversation today - I know what you mean now too :) most excellent.

VaTechBob - I am disappointed at how bland and muted the colors are too!

Posted by: Camden-CapitalWeatherGang | October 25, 2010 6:03 PM | Report abuse

We're still prob a week or 10 days off peak in D.C. at least but I haven't found the color to be terrible this yr considering. The maples look nice at least.

Posted by: Ian-CapitalWeatherGang | October 25, 2010 7:16 PM | Report abuse

Today's weather - typically this year's pattern - warmer than usual and dry. The totals don't show the dryness but it's too easy to go 2-3 weeks without a drop of rain and it dumps 3 inches in one wad load. Not good.

The colors at Skyline Drive was disappointing this past weekend.

Posted by: LoudounGeek | October 25, 2010 7:16 PM | Report abuse

Surprisingly, the trees on my land seem to be showing their usual fall color, despite Jefferson County's severe summer drought. I know some of the specimens very well, having photographed them over the years. They look as good as ever--except that today's wind ripped off a lot of leaves.

Posted by: tinkerbelle | October 25, 2010 8:22 PM | Report abuse

I think part of the issue is that the more "classic" locations around here for fall color were the hardest hit by drought and some still remain there. In closer to D.C. we were dry much of the recent past few months but we've also had bouts of rain intermixed.

Posted by: Ian-CapitalWeatherGang | October 25, 2010 9:44 PM | Report abuse

I think we're on the cusp for the best fall color in our area. Just this a.m. I was seeing some real color. Is it as vibrant as in past years? Well, not yet, but there's color ...

Posted by: weathergrrl | October 25, 2010 10:26 PM | Report abuse

Good fall color around here. Wind could cause problems.

Upper Midwest is comparing this storm with the 1940 Armistice Day blizzard. A better analog for that area might be the "land hurricane" which hit that region on Oct. 10, 1950. The Armistice Day storm had far more snow than this storm is likely to produce in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Posted by: Bombo47jea | October 25, 2010 11:59 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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