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Capital Weather Gang Archive: Books

Unmasking disinformation, from tobacco to climate

It's no secret that many climate skeptics have ties to the fossil fuel industry, or are ideologically opposed to the policy implications of mainstream climate science, which holds that emissions of greenhouse gases are causing global temperatures to increase. This has been explored in numerous books, most notably in Ross Gelbspan's "The Heat is On" and "Boiling Point," as well as the more recent work by James Hoggan, "Climate Cover-Up: The Crusade to Deny Global Warming."

By Andrew Freedman  | June 9, 2010; 11:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (91)
Categories:  Books, Climate Change, Freedman, Media  
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Landstrike: New York's horrible hurricane scenario

I found it easy to imagine what a hurricane like Hugo, or the '38 storm, would do if it hit New York City directly. Although I had never intended to write fiction, I soon found myself sketching out a story. Some friends encouraged me, and before long I was writing what became Landstrike. My goal for Landstrike was to make it as realistic as possible, while educating the reader about what a storm like this would be like. Most likely, a major storm threatening New York would be moving fast--thus reducing warning time (the 1938 hurricane was moving faster than 50 mph when it came ashore on Long Island). Also, because hurricanes approaching the Atlantic coast tend to curve northward, their landfall is much more difficult to predict than a storm approaching the Gulf Coast. As a result, New Yorkers would get relatively little warning time, a fact highlighted in the book.

By Jason Samenow  | June 3, 2010; 10:45 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (10)
Categories:  Books, Tropical Weather  
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Back-door cold fronts and historic weather

Meet Paul Yeager, meteorologist and editor, who earlier this month published the book Weather Whys: Facts, Myths, and Oddities. The book offers a treasure trove of short weather vignettes, covering weather folklore, weird phenomena and weather history. I invited Paul to blog about a couple topics in his book relating to Washington, D.C. weather. Here's what he had to share with us...

By Jason Samenow  | March 31, 2010; 11:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (2)
Categories:  Books  
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551.5: Book Nook

551.5 is the Dewey Decimal System classification for meteorology. In his post last weekend, Ground Truth, Andrew points out that seeing is believing: Because climate change "exists beyond our field of vision it's hard to be completely convinced of its existence, and therefore of the necessity of addressing it." Andrew...

By Steve Scolnik  | January 23, 2008; 7:30 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (10)
Categories:  Books, Climate Change  
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Freedman: Ground Truth

"Seeing is believing" is a saying that can mean a great deal in life. It is typically used in conversation to refer to something strange that happened that no one would have believed could happen until it actually happened, like a window-washer falling 47 stories and surviving or a penguin...

By Andrew Freedman  | January 20, 2008; 11:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (16)
Categories:  Books, Climate Change, Freedman, Science  
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