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Photos Released in Jefferson Corruption Trial


This photo presented on Wednesday July 8, 2009 as court evidence and provided by the U.S. Attorney's office shows contents seized on Aug. 3, 2005 from the freezer of the Washington home of then-Rep. William Jefferson, D-La. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's office)

By Allison Klein
The late-night jokesters have been having fun with former U.S. Rep. William Jefferson since the 2005 FBI raid on his Capitol Hill house, when investigators found $90,000 hidden in his freezer.

Finally, four years later, jurors saw pictures of the infamous cold cash. There were stacks and stacks of it, neatly folded in aluminum foil and placed inside a box of Boca meatless burgers and in a Pillsbury Pie Crust box and a Yes! Organic Market bag. (See above and below.)

In one shot, a wad of the money was held by a gloved hand, fanned out like a prop in a hip-hop video.


This photo presented on Wednesday July 8, 2009 as court evidence and provided by the U.S. Attorney's office shows an unidentified FBI agent holding contents seized on Aug. 3, 2005 from the freezer of the Washington home of then-Rep. William Jefferson, D-La. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's office)

The cash was supposed to go to Atiku Abubakar, then vice president of Nigeria, as a bribe, according to federal prosecutors, who are in their third week of presenting evidence against the Louisiana Democrat at his trial in Alexandria.

They allege that he squeezed hundreds of thousands of dollars in kickbacks from people who sought his help.

Jefferson has maintained that he might have committed unethical acts, but they were not illegal. He says he did not bribe anyone, and all of his business dealings were as a private citizen, not in his official capacity as a congressman.

So far in the trial, Jefferson associates Vernon L. Jackson, owner of Kentucky technology firm iGate, and Brett Pfeffer, a former congressional aide, have testified against him. Both pleaded guilty in 2006 to bribery and are serving time in prison.

The photos were introduced while FBI agent Jennifer Pach was on the stand, who was there when his home was raided.


This photo presented on Wednesday July 8, 2009 as court evidence and provided by the U.S. Attorney's office shows an unidentified FBI agent holding contents seized on Aug. 3, 2005 from the freezer of the Washington home of then-Rep. William Jefferson, D-La. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's office)


This photo presented on Wednesday July 8, 2009 as court evidence and provided by the U.S. Attorney's office shows an unidentified FBI agent holding contents seized on Aug. 3, 2005 from the freezer of the Washington home of then-Rep. William Jefferson, D-La. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's office)


This photo presented on Wednesday July 8, 2009 as court evidence and provided by the U.S. Attorney's office shows the kitchen on Aug. 3, 2005 of the Washington home of then-Rep. William Jefferson, D-La. Jurors in the bribery trial of former Rep. (AP Photo/U.S. Attorney's office).

By Web Politics Editor  |  July 9, 2009; 4:38 PM ET
Categories:  Ethics and Rules  
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Comments

Refrigerators:

Hot money over time has gotten a bad rap. It seems that the authorities
prefer to see that money in the freezer is a crime. The genes of Black
America are inclined to prefer Cool, e.g., "That's cool" or "Cool Man".

It would seem that keeping money in freezers, by Black Americans, is
logically a cool practice, and not keeping money in banks is logically cool,
based on recent history. One should question the authorities digging
into freezers when the Wall Street thieves are rewarded for their thefts
and given a pass for doing it.

The Stimulus should consider grants for the manufacturers of refrigerators and freezers, since Cool is where it is.

Posted by: 3rd-PartyAdovcate | July 10, 2009 3:05 PM | Report abuse

Nice kitchen island

Posted by: davidwamsley53001 | July 13, 2009 3:27 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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