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Posted at 10:43 AM ET, 02/16/2009

Celeb Wedding Trends: Invitations

By Liz Kelly

A recycled (and plantable) invite. (Courtesy Green Fields Paper Company)

For those who emulate celebrities in all aspects of life, but most especially marriage, take note. One of the newest trend sweeping high-wattage weddings is the post-nuptial invite.

Los Angeles stationer Ellen Black (view a gallery of Black's celebrity invites), who crafted custom invites for the wedding of Fergie and Josh Duhamel, recently told People.com, "There's a current trend for celebrities to give out the invitation as a gift at the end of the wedding."


"That way, they can avoid the invitation being revealed before the wedding and can keep all the details a secret."

How do guests actually find out crucial details like time and place? Their people call your people and bad-a-bing, you're sipping champagne while you chat up Brad Pitt (or Corey Haim, depending on the wedding).

Fergie and Duhamel also gifted guests with a comic caricature of themselves. How thoughtful.

A few, more practical, celeb-inspired options:

Save printing costs and trees by sending your evites designed by celebrity wedding photographer Robert Evans, whose celeb gigs have included the wedding of Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston and Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes. View Evans's eVite collection. (I'm partial to "Robo Man" on page three.)

Not ready to go the digital route? Take a cue from Alicia Silverstone and husband Christopher Jarecki, who sent out invites printed on 100 percent recycled paper embedded with seeds. Once the wedding took place, guests could plant the paper and add a little much-needed green to the planet. Silverstone and Jarecki scored their invites from Green Field Paper Co.

Invite President Barack Obama to attend your special day. He and wife Michelle probably won't come, but White House ettiquette insists the president and first lady respond with a signed letter. Get all the details on where to direct your invite here, but be warned: It could take up to six weeks for your response to arrive.

By Liz Kelly  | February 16, 2009; 10:43 AM ET
Categories:  Celebrities  
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Comments

"Invite President Barack Obama to attend your special day. He and wife Michelle probably won't come, but White House ettiquette insists the president and first lady respond with a signed letter"

Liz, your spell check is on the fritz.

The "signature" on the response letter is faux.

Posted by: jezebel3 | February 16, 2009 11:10 AM | Report abuse

"There's a current trend for celebrities to give out the invitation as a gift at the end of the wedding."

That's...actually quite clever. Are they technically invitations at that point, though?

In any case, very cool stuff here. I could spend all day on the Lehr and Black website, just ogling.

Posted by: Bawlmer51 | February 16, 2009 11:30 AM | Report abuse

Wow, that Lehr and Black site is awesome. Sad to see how many marriages-gone-bad are on there though. :(
It's a little much, but I ADORE Eva and Tony's save the date.

And if you send a graduation notice to the Obamas, you'll get a "congratulations" card. I have one from Clinton from high school and one from Bush from college.

Posted by: eet7e | February 16, 2009 11:35 AM | Report abuse

I went to a wedding nearly ten years ago where the invites were on plantable paper. It was positively charming! Their thank-you notes were plantable, too.
I got at least one plantable Christmas card this year, too. If anyone is looking for a cool celeb trend for kicks, this is an affordable one.

Posted by: otherliz | February 16, 2009 11:38 AM | Report abuse

I like the plantable invites.

Yes, the White House will send a note about any major life event. Girl Scout Gold Award, Boy Scout Eagle Award, graduations, weddings, anniversaries. Now, mind you, they are not personally signed. But, still really cool.

Posted by: epjd | February 16, 2009 11:43 AM | Report abuse

I agree on those plantable invites, they're kinda cool & affordable unlike so much celebucrap.

Posted by: wadejg | February 16, 2009 12:10 PM | Report abuse

jez
The "signature" on the response letter is faux.

Owe, the humanity!

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 12:25 PM | Report abuse

jez
The "signature" on the response letter is faux.

Owe, the humanity!

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 12:25 PM
===========
Nosy, clearly your spell check is on the fritz. That would be

Aux, the humanity!

Posted by: mdreader01 | February 16, 2009 1:03 PM | Report abuse

Black's celebrity invites, and the occasions they announce, are Exhibit A as to why Celebrities should join corporate CEOs in taking major pay cuts.

Why invite Obama, when you can have a clown at your wedding by inviting Rod Blagojevich?

Posted by: sasquatchbigfoot | February 16, 2009 1:10 PM | Report abuse

mdreader01
Aux, the humanity!

Très bien, amie.

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 1:11 PM | Report abuse

I'm thinking some dim-witted celebrities have confused the Green Field Paper Company's "Hemp Heritage" paper with their "Seed Embedded Paper."

But perhaps for the right price and the right celebrity, the two could be combined.

Posted by: mdreader01 | February 16, 2009 1:24 PM | Report abuse

mdreader
But perhaps for the right price and the right celebrity, the two could be combined.

I imagine Woody Harrelson's already working on it.

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 1:36 PM | Report abuse

All right, I bit. I looked at the Black's invites. Considering some of their clients, those invites are amazingly tasteful and elegant.

As for the price, the celebs are the only ones with money to spend. Having these parties keeps lots of people employed.

Posted by: epjd | February 16, 2009 1:42 PM | Report abuse

"There's a current trend for celebrities to give out the invitation as a gift at the end of the wedding."

I hate to point out the obvious here, but if you are receiving this at the end of an event you've already been invited to and attending, it's not an "invitation."

It's either a stamped parking pass, a receipt, or a "I went to Josh's & Fergie's wedding and all I got was this lousy card" card. Plantable or not.

Posted by: td_in_baltimore | February 16, 2009 3:05 PM | Report abuse

td, one could think of them as souvenirs, remembrances or keepsakes.

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 3:16 PM | Report abuse

td, one could think of them as souvenirs, remembrances or keepsakes.

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 3:16 PM

Seriously - who keeps wedding invites except for the bride and groom? Do people do it for celeb invites so that they can impress people? ...

Posted by: atlmom1234 | February 16, 2009 3:41 PM | Report abuse

atlmom
Seriously - who keeps wedding invites except for the bride and groom?

Some of us are evidently more sentimental than others.

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 16, 2009 3:47 PM | Report abuse

Robert Evans, Photographer to the Stars.

B...F...D...

His website is too cute by half and wastes bandwidth with cute graphics.

Evans' web galleries contain good shots, but nothing you won't see from any good commercial photographer.

And note that Evans does not have any pricing information on his website. Apparently if you have to ask his hourly rate, you can't afford him.

To summarize: if slick marketing and name dropping are the most important qualities you want in your event photographer, Robert Evans is your man.

Feh.

Posted by: sasquatchbigfoot | February 16, 2009 5:44 PM | Report abuse

Liz, thank you for pointing out the White House invitation response. Do you have an inside track on other people who might not attend a party, but still respond?

The host caricature is just what I want to bring home from every party. Ow!

Posted by: ideallydc | February 17, 2009 8:32 AM | Report abuse

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