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Posted at 4:50 PM ET, 02/ 7/2011

Melissa Leo, seeking Oscar consideration

By Jen Chaney

Melissa Leo, seeking consideration. (Image via Awards Daily)

The year's Academy Awards campaign needed a little dose of excitement. And in that spirit -- boom! -- here comes Melissa Leo's self-created, "For Your Consideration" campaign.

Leo -- who already looks very well-positioned to win an Oscar for her feisty supporting turn in "The Fighter" -- decided not to leave all the promotional business up to Paramount and Relativity Media, the studios behind the boxing drama. So she placed her own trade-paper ads that simply ask voters to "consider" her.

The actress told Deadline, "I took matters into my own hands. I knew what I was doing and told my representation how earnest I was about this idea."

But was that idea a good idea?

Some -- like the folks over at Movieline -- are already saying the glamour shots come across as overly desperate, especially since Leo approaches the Feb. 27 Oscar ceremony as the front runner in her category. Others believe her gutsy performance as Alice Ward is so strong that it doesn't matter how she goes about pitching herself to voters.

My take is that she should have stuck with just a single image, the one of her in the black dress. Because the second piece -- seen below -- smacks way too much of a perfume ad.

"Calvin Klein's Oscar Obsession ... oh, the smell of it."


(Image via Awards Daily)

It's debatable that this decision will cost her the Academy Award. But it's certainly a puzzling move for someone who seems to care first about the craft and not so much about all the distractions and politics that tend to accompany awards season.

Really, Melissa Leo didn't need to ask for extra consideration from her peers. Seems to me she had already already gotten it simply by doing what she's always done: really good work.

By Jen Chaney  | February 7, 2011; 4:50 PM ET
Categories:  Awards Season  
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Comments

Melissa Leo? Is this the same Melissa Leo that was on Homocide: Life on the Streets?

Ole Elias can't quit recall what this wack job did back then but suffice to say that her personal life would have warranted arrest by Det. Francis X.Pembleton and whoever was his partner that week!

Posted by: elias_howe | February 7, 2011 5:37 PM | Report abuse

I have to agree, I'm surprised she would stoop to campaigning for an Oscar. Her work doesn't need it.

Plus, to echo elias_howe above, she looks much better than she did back on "Homicide: Life on the Streets". Has she had boatloads of plastic surgery?

Posted by: LittleRed1 | February 7, 2011 8:17 PM | Report abuse

Yup, the same Melissa from Homicide. Wasn't she on Treme, too? She cleans up nice.

She had a messy custody fight back during her Homicide days with John Heard - I think all wack was on HIS side, Elias.

Posted by: kbockl | February 8, 2011 9:32 AM | Report abuse

kbockl - not all the wack on was on John Heard's side. They both did some interesting stuff (as in interesting enough to involved the B'more police), all in the name of love and custody.

But she sure cleans up nice and is a great actress.

Posted by: BMore_Cat_Lover | February 8, 2011 10:04 AM | Report abuse

I recall reading that Melissa Leo claimed that John Heard was stalking her back in the "Homicide: Life on the Streets" days, after she had his baby out of wedlock (not that marriage would have solved the krazar). Don't think Leo's had much in the way of "work," just that she eschewed makeup back on "Homicide" with the justification that the male cop characters didn't wear it, so why should she?

Liz, what says our Queen Vegetarian re the fur she's wearing?

Posted by: Nosy_Parker | February 8, 2011 11:48 AM | Report abuse

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