About Channel '08  |  Blog Partner: PrezVid.com  |  RSS Feeds RSS Feed  (What's RSS?)

Driving Mitt Romney

We've noticed through this week's seven-part Boston Globe/Boston.com series on Mitt Romney that the former Massachusetts governor has a thing for in-car interviews. The Globe's project includes video interviews with the candidate, some childhood friends, and business partners.

Video excerpts of Romney speaking with a Boston.com producer in a moving car are from April 26, as the candidate traveled from New Hampshire's Seacoast region, to Exeter, then back east to Portsmouth, according to Boston.com editor David Beard.

That's a similar interview format to Romney's moving car interview on NBC's "Today" show back in late May. And when washingtonpost.com made an interview request with the Romney campaign in early June, staffers initially offered us the chance to interview the governor on a car ride across part of New Hampshire. (That "PostTalk" interview eventually was filmed in a Manchester hotel suite.)

So why does Romney seem to show up in on-the-road interviews? Campaign spokesman Kevin Madden says "The governor's schedule is so tight that one of the way's we are able to get one-on-one time with reporters is to have them ride-along with him during campaign travel. He keeps such a hectic pace that the only time he's really sitting still is either in the car or on a plane."

Indeed, as Chris Cillizza and Paul Kane recently reported in part one of washingtonpost.com's Fast Track Campaign series, this cycle's front-loaded primary calendar will put "pressure on candidates to operate costly and exhausting bi-coastal campaigns, to try to simultaneously drive up their numbers in the Northeast and Midwest and in the far West and Southwest." Thus Romney's in-car Q&A's.

One other note about the Boston.com and "Today" show interviews: In both instances, Romney isn't wearing his seat belt. The Globe spoke with Romney on April 26, about a month before the NBC interviewed aired. Following the "Today" chat, both Romney and NBC's Matt Lauer apologized for not wearing seat belts. Lauer had recently interviewed Gov. Jon Corzine (D-N.J.), who suffered severe injuries during a car crash in which he wasn't wearing his seat belt.

"Sometimes I forget to wear my seat belt. For my own safety, I need to keep reminding myself to buckle up," Romney said in his apology.

Madden tells us that, "The interview took place during a car ride through New Hampshire. New Hampshire does not have a mandatory seatbelt law. Nevertheless, Gov. Romney believes he should make every effort to wear a seatbelt when traveling. Unfortunately, there will be instances when the governor has not been as careful ensuring that he is buckled up, but he will continue to make sure he uses precaution and adheres to car safety practices."

As for the reporters interviewing the governor, Boston.com's Beard says the videographer who filmed the interview, Thushan Amarasiriwardena, was wearing his seat belt, but reporter/producer Ann Silvio was not.

Watch The Globe's video interviews with Romney here, and watch the "Today" show interview from late May below.

By Ed O'Keefe |  June 25, 2007; 2:21 PM ET Mitt Romney
Previous: Meet an Obama Volunteer | Next: One Toke Over the Line

Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



There is a wonderful 7 part series on Romney in the Boston Globe (seatbelts not involved) that you might want to check out. The writer apparently was surprised at the amount of material that was available to him. From my viewpoint up to this point it was well done. There is more to come.

Posted by: Mary Deame | June 25, 2007 9:10 PM

There is a wonderful 7 part series on Romney in the Boston Globe (seatbelts not involved) that you might want to check out. The writer apparently was surprised at the amount of material that was available to him. From my viewpoint up to this point it was well done. There is more to come.

Posted by: Mary Deame | June 25, 2007 9:10 PM

After reviewing the accomlishments of all the leading candidates Mitt Romney is the only one that can walk the walk in Business experience,family values,history of bringing together opposing parties,and a strong vision and creativity in facing the country's current problems.

Posted by: Don | July 11, 2007 3:13 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 

© 2007 The Washington Post Company