Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Column Archive |  On Twitter: J Huget and MisFits  |  Fitness & Nutrition News  |  RSS Feeds RSS Feed

Me ... as I'm meant to be?

Will losing 10 pounds really deliver all the goods I expect? Linda Bacon, a nutrition professor at the University of California, Davis, an advocate of the Health at Every Size movement, urges me to reconsider my campaign.

Dear Jennifer,

It can be such a heady feeling when you're ready to commit to a weight-loss plan. You know it's going to be tough, but you're also thinking about all the wonderful rewards that come with a thinner you -- attention, admiration, respect, good health... It's exciting and enticing.


I don't want to curb your enthusiasm, because I know you can get those rewards. But I want to redirect you, because you won't get there on the path you're considering. Science -- and history -- make their point clearly: When your goal is weight loss and dietary control, at some point, you WILL crash -- yet again. I want to help you re-frame your strategy so you can actually achieve what you're looking for.

It's way too easy to believe that you can control your weight by watching your diet or exercising regularly. Sure, that works short-term. You may even be able to maintain that weight loss until your birthday. But the reality is that biologic safeguards underlie your body's resistance to maintaining weight loss. Most people, regardless of willpower or diet or exercise, regain the weight they lose over time. (Check out the research: Few people maintain significant weight or fat loss by increasing their physical activity, even when exercise habits are maintained. The research also shows that dietary vigilance is actually a strong predictor of weight gain!) It's not your fault that you are among the majority who hasn't been able to keep the weight off thus far.

It's also way too easy to believe that a thinner body will get you what you want. The reality is that this fantasy of weight loss is what's stopping you from having what you want -- not your weight itself. Feeling loved and respected and good health are all accessible to you -- regardless of the number on the scale. You can go after them directly, without depending on your weight as a mediator. Achieving them will be much more meaningful when they are predicated on values other than your weight. After all, can you really feel good about who you are if people are drawn to you just because you're thin?

I don't want you to give up on your dreams. What I am suggesting is that you move on. When you stop trying to control your weight, you can allow your body to do the job for you -- naturally and much more effectively. Your body can tell you how much to eat and which foods work best, if you are attentive to its signals. You will settle at a weight that is best for you -- though it may be higher than cultural ideals or even the unscientific numbers recommended by today's health "experts."

Will you lose weight if you dump the diet mentality and trust yourself? I can't predict that. But I do know that if you stop fighting yourself, you can improve your health and well-being -- and it's a lot more fun. (I speak with authority here -- I've actually tested this in a government-sponsored research study, published in top scientific journals.)

If you'd like more information or support in implementing these ideas, check out my book, "Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth About Your Weight." You can also find other support and resources related to Health at Every Size by visiting the (free) HAES Community Resources.

My birthday wish for you is that you can see the amazing beauty in your unique body -- regardless of what you weigh -- and lavish it with the kindness, love and respect it deserves.

Warmly,

Linda Bacon

By Jennifer LaRue Huget  |  April 15, 2010; 7:00 AM ET
Categories:  Guest Blogger , Me Minus 10 , Nutrition and Fitness , Obesity , Women's Health  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Popular stem cell lines submitted for approval
Next: Is that right? Nutrition Facts are enough?

Comments

"Trusting your body" becomes very difficult with some of the high-energy density foods on the market today...it's possible to have overeaten before the body signals that you're full. Trusting your body is part of it...the other part is making sure that you aren't training your body to want more than it needs. I'd recommend looking in to "The End of Overeating" for some examples of this sort of thing.

Posted by: neversaylie | April 15, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

I started out with weight loss in mind when I gained about 15 pounds over the last year or so. I tried to watch what I ate (didn't do so hot with that but am a lot more mindful of sugars and bad carbs); I joined a gym and employed a personal trainer. I told the PT that I would like to drop inches in my fat middle, and would like to gain strength in my arms and legs. In four months time, I haven't dropped much weight or lost one inch, which peeves me no end. So, I'm still chunked out, but I have become stronger, particularly in my legs. My arms are getting there. I have to work my core much harder than I'm doing. Never ending battle and to think I was 100-125 until I hit my late 40's. Sigh.

Posted by: MrsKirby | April 15, 2010 11:43 AM | Report abuse

I love that Linda Bacon wrote you! Thank you for posting this. I actually stopped reading your column because of the new focus on weight loss.

Definitely, read her book. And read Kate Harding's amazing essay on The Fantasy of Being Thin: http://kateharding.net/2007/11/27/the-fantasy-of-being-thin/

Posted by: mehs | April 15, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

also, most people don't do hardly enough in the gym to work off the fat.

even those with PT's spend most of their time gabbing about nonsense.


i see it every day in the gym.

Posted by: AnonJohn | April 15, 2010 11:47 AM | Report abuse

lies, pure lies.

another heartwarming way to say you're ok if you're fat.

caloric deficit equals weight loss. period.

change your life. dont do something that is a fad. count calories for a while and see what a real portion is.

plus 90% of people in a gym dont do hardly enough work to make any difference.

i see it all the time. even those with personal trainers spend half the time gabbing about this or that.

i lost 75lbs and kept it off by changing my life.

Posted by: AnonJohn | April 15, 2010 11:49 AM | Report abuse

Letting go is what got me in this mess. I think it's time I worked harder.

I found this extremely discouraging, by the way. And not at all in line with my own experiences: keep an eye on diet & exercise, see better results.

Posted by: sarahabc | April 15, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

I think there is something to be said for a middle ground here -- not just "give up," which is more or less the message Ms. Bacon is telegraphing (whether it's intentional or not); but also not "OMG I will not be happy until I weigh X," either, because that's just as insane.

There are certain things we do for our health -- not weighing 350 lbs is one of them, for a lot of us. (Our knees thank us, our hearts thank us....)

But I do think she touches on the good point that if all you're trying to address is the number on the scale, and not how you view yourself, you will never stop trying to lose "just 5 more lbs" and you run the terrible danger of weight loss becoming an all-consuming thing, rather than a goal that is attained and then maintained. Weight loss -- or maintenance -- is in most cases not the be-all end-all of things.

Look beyond the diet, not just in the sense of what happens when you're done, but with the rest of your life. After all, what good is being more aesthetically pleasing if you pushed your entire circle of family and friends away while being a monster about dieting because you didn't lose Y pounds this week?

Posted by: forget@menot.com | April 15, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

EXCELLENT! We definitely need to see much more of the "Health at Every Size" approach in the mainstream media. I only wish the First Lady would adopt this healthy, sensible approach and abandon the harmful "War on Obesity."

Posted by: jjjunob | April 15, 2010 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Hi. The links don't seem to get where they're supposed to, so I'd like to just clarify here. A good place to connect with the Health at Every Size community is www.HAESCommunity.org. Info about my book, Health at Every Size, can be found at www.HAESbook.com and info about me can be found at www.LindaBacon.org. There is also a professional organization for people who practice HAES - it's called the Association for Size Diversity and Health (www.sizediversityandhealth.org) and you can find additional resources on their website.

Posted by: LindaBacon | April 15, 2010 1:11 PM | Report abuse

Whatever happened to the notion that we eat right and exercise, get sleep and try to find joy in our day so we feel good? I'm carrying around an extra 10 pounds above my "feel good" weight and I know it. And I know what I need to do about it. It happens to correspond with BMI numbers hovering in the high end of healthy, but my body tells me when it's time to cut back. And despite fighting the mid-40s female metabolism, it generally works. Healthy weights come in shades of gray, not usually black and white.

Posted by: bluestilton | April 15, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

Whatever happened to the notion that we eat right and exercise, get sleep and try to find joy in our day so we feel good? I'm carrying around an extra 10 pounds above my "feel good" weight and I know it. And I know what I need to do about it. It happens to correspond with BMI numbers hovering in the high end of healthy, but my body tells me when it's time to cut back. And despite fighting the mid-40s female metabolism, it generally works. Healthy weights come in shades of gray, not usually black and white.

Posted by: bluestilton | April 15, 2010 1:13 PM | Report abuse

I think the overriding message here is that arbitrary goals are only short-term motivators; such is true in most aspects of life. I don't think I can subscribe to some of the wording in the article, it seems to be dismissive of the idea of regular exercise and watching what you eat. Fact is, there are those folks out there who won the metabolic lottery and are naturally thin, but there are also tons of folks out there who keep the pounds off by maintaining a healthy diet and regular exercise. Yes, if you normally like eating garbage and decide to go on a diet, then you will at some point relapse just like a smoker, alcoholic, or drug addict. It's what you decide to do after that relapse that will determine your long term outcome. Nothing worth doing is easy.

On another note, can the nutrition community PLEASE get rid of this ridiculous idea of body mass index? It's just absurd. According to their completely arbitrary reckoning, a man my height should weigh 148 pounds. Well, sorry, that's how much I weighed when I graduated high school and I was a twig. It's completely unrealistic and absurd.

Posted by: pswift00 | April 15, 2010 1:28 PM | Report abuse

There is a lot of hand-waving going on here. You cannot lump, you should pardon the expression, all weight loss together.

If you are within the non-overweight BMI range and want to lose ten pounds, that's one thing. If you need to lose 100 pounds to get into the non-overweight BMI range, THAT IS ANOTHER THING ENTIRELY.

Making yourself miserable and frustrated trying to lose 5 or 10 pounds just because you think you'll look better in your swimsuit is crazy. The problem isn't in your body, it's in your head. But that is, unfortunately, not where most people in the fat acceptance movement are at.

All the data agrees that when you start getting 25+ pounds over the non-overweight BMI range, you increase your risk of serious health problems dramatically. You also start to have other quality of life issues. If you find, for example, you can't fit in airline seats, the solution is losing weight, not agitating for fat acceptance or trying to convince the person next to you that the armrest really should be up.

Posted by: anon99 | April 15, 2010 1:38 PM | Report abuse

I guess every doctor I've ever talked to is wrong. It's great to know that being 90 pounds over some quack's arbitrary standard is ok. Thank God I can stop worrying about hypertension, stroke and diabetes. I'm going to run right home and throw out all those silly pills.

Posted by: posttoastie1 | April 15, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

I am going to disagree with you on some aspects of what you suggested. The problem comes from the fact many of the foods are high fat or fructose in the ingredients as such that it is difficult to lose weight. What I see is the attempt to do spot weight loss and it does not work.

What should be implemented is exercise upward to 1 hour with cardio built into the process, eating lean food without all the additives, and getting enough sleep. When you start getting the hang of it, you start feeling more energy.

Most of the time I see people utilizing the PT, is just to justify not exercising. I have seen one actually push people into really exercising and that's a good PT does. The person has to make the effort on their own and be surrounded with friends who will push you along.

Posted by: beeker25 | April 15, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

Alas, this column is placating garbage, and not worthy of a blog, let alone the Post. Please, readers, don't believe it. Diet and exercise work, and I have 20+ years of proof.

Posted by: Dodona | April 15, 2010 1:44 PM | Report abuse

Alas, this column is placating garbage, and not worthy of a blog, let alone the Post. Please, readers, don't believe it. Diet and exercise work, and I have 20+ years of proof.

Posted by: Dodona

Agreed...

Posted by: beeker25 | April 15, 2010 1:45 PM | Report abuse

I couldn't disagree with Linda Bacon any more strongly (BTW, she has a GREAT aptonym, there, I think Gene Weingarten would heartily approve!). I'd always been a little overweight when I committed to a diet and exercise program about 3 years ago. I joined the gym, did a lot of cardio at first, but have moved into strength training over time. I started to watch the quality and quantity of the food I was eating, cut out salt from my diet, and since then have lost 30 pounds and kept it off. You just have to adopt the eating less and exercising more as your daily lifestyle, not as a short-term goal, and you'll be fine. Making excuses for failure, as Ms. Bacon does, is not a good thing. I support the First Lady's initiatives on diet and obesity!

Posted by: MrTinDC | April 15, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

I realize that my evidence is anecdotal, but four years ago I decided I needed to lose 7 pounds, and off it came with exercise and watching my food intake. It has stayed off, with exercise and watching my food intake. It really is a simple concept. If my wife and I treat ourselves to dessert on a night out, we simply say, "An extra hour on the equipment should do it."

ps We are senior citizens, with a lot of aches and pains from getting old, but that doesn't stop us from working out daily.

Posted by: AZrls | April 15, 2010 2:16 PM | Report abuse

In 1993 I decided to drop some weight. I weighed 295. I started walking at a nearby track, from one mile up to four miles every night, rain or shine. And I stopped with ice cream and desserts. It took about nine months, and I lost 95 lbs. In the ensuing years I've gained back and lost about 15 of those 95 lbs, but the rest have stayed gone, long gone.

In my experience, there is no 'one size fits all' method for successfull and lasting weight loss. For me, it was about gentle and consistent exercise -- I didn't need weights or a gym or a PT, just a nice track and some decent shoes and some consistency. I also ate less simple carbs and more proteins, but did not obsess about it; if there was birthday cake at the office, I ate some.

Seventeen years later, those 95 lbs are still gone, plus or minus 15 lbs that have become harder to dump since I hit my 50s. It has made a difference in my life: people no longer stare at me and my size 22 body and face. I'm taken more seriously in my job than before in my size 14-16 body and face. The weight is not a distraction to me and to others.

For me, the bottom line was not to worry about PTs, diets, gyms, sneaking potato chips in the middle of the night, etc.: it was about consistent low level exercise that I was *committed* to doing.

Worrying about all the rest of it that seems to go hand in hand with dieting and exercise and weight loss in general -- is just, IMO, a bunch of distractions and rationalizations. If you really want to lose weight and keep it off, you already know what to do and you know how your body will respond best. Don't kid yourself or waste your time with all the other fluff.

Posted by: lanehatcher | April 15, 2010 2:23 PM | Report abuse

One of our greatest enemies in the quest for good weight/health is our lack of activity. We sit behind desks punching keys for 8-10+ hours a day. On top of that we make poor food choices and choose amounts that aren't correct. We eat or snack because for many people our jobs are not fulfilling and eating satiates the boredom. We also have grown lazy, and wimpy. We pick the closest parking space to the store so we don't have to walk, instead of walking the .5-1mile distance to the store in the first place. Heaven forbid that we get a little cold/hot/wet etc so we skip getting outdoors and exercising. Many people have also forgotten, or never learned to take responsibility for their actions and to own them, bad or good. So the moral to the story? Get out there and just do it. Don't make excuses for yourself, own who you are and what you want to accomplish, educate yourself, and get moving. However you decide to do it, get out and do it and enjoy the new, happier, more satisfied you.

Posted by: JorgeGortex | April 15, 2010 2:48 PM | Report abuse

This is absurd and almost offensive. Diet and exercise make no difference? Stop worrying and just let your body do it for you naturally? Holy hypothyroid, Batman, why didn't I think of that? Forget diabetes, just eat whatever your body is tuned in to.

Sure, lavish love on yourself ... but *also* follow a sensible nutrition program and get some exercise. And if you want to lose weight, eat fewer calories than you expend in exercise. Pretty simple. You can even love yourself while you do it.

Posted by: mojumi | April 15, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

She isn't too encouraging!

However, she may be right that over time we all tend to put a few pounds on. Once we start losing weight in old age it's often not a good thing.

HOWEVER, since our tendency during middle-age is to put some pounds on it's not crazy to try and enter the life-period a bit lighter. That way the 10 pounds you probably will gain with menopause and increased age will not sit atop the 10 pounds you put on during your child bearing years.

While a thinner body will not bring back youth, that wonderful natural hair color or a firm jawline it will help you avoid high blood pressure, diabetes and the other not-fun side effects.

Remember that your campaign is not a temporary thing, it's a lifestyle change that you are undertaking to improve the quality of your future life.

Posted by: RedBird27 | April 15, 2010 5:18 PM | Report abuse

The previous 4 or 5 comments are actually getting to the truth. There is a very old adage about weight loss "Everyone knows what they have to do, they just don't want to do it" Being overweight is all about your own personal psychological problems. Fix those, with the help of a psychologist if need be, and you will automatically stop "eating to get good feelings". You will actually just eat for your health only and get the "good feelings" from your life.

Posted by: jimsandy1 | April 15, 2010 5:34 PM | Report abuse

Thanks so much for printing this alternative view. I believe weight control efforts generally backfire, leaving the dieter either the same or fatter, but miserable and eternally hungry too. I feel like such a wet blanket amongst all the "you go girl" messages regarding your weight loss ambitions, but I really think you're better off just leaving those 10 pounds alone. That said, I am actually a "successful" dieter, in that I now maintain a weight of 130 (at 5'6"), from a history of yo-yo-ing up and down from 155. But at what cost? I was bulimic in college, anorexic until I was 30 years old, and then a yo-yo-er for the next ten years, with a few intermittent periods of obesity (over 170). I found stability through Overeaters Anonymous, but to maintain my weight, I have to make my "recovery" the center of my life. I know I'm an extreme example of weight struggles and obsession, but I still feel that if I'd never started dieting at age 13 (and I wasn't overweight at that point), I perhaps could have avoided all sorts of misery. Dieting lead me to a pattern of binging and weight gain, which took 30 years to overcome. Don't get on that merry go round. Don't diet.

Posted by: Nutmeg2 | April 15, 2010 7:08 PM | Report abuse

This story does a disservice to a population that is decidedly more obese, less health conscious and more sedentary than at any point in our history. Walk daily, work out, stick to a lean diet, eat smaller portions and take sugar out of daily foods. The idea that “we are meant to look this way” as we are far, far from the evolutionary use of our body (how we store/burn fat,etc) is dangerous and gives inaction a foothold where is deserves none.

Posted by: cadam72 | April 15, 2010 8:45 PM | Report abuse

This story does a disservice to a population that is decidedly more obese, less health conscious and more sedentary than at any point in our history. Walk daily, work out, stick to a lean diet, eat smaller portions and take sugar out of daily foods. The idea that “we are meant to look this way” as we are far, far from the evolutionary use of our body (how we store/burn fat,etc) is dangerous and gives inaction a foothold where is deserves none.

Posted by: cadam72 | April 15, 2010 8:45 PM | Report abuse

I go up and down by 15 lbs. over the course of the year: lighter in the summer, heavier in the winter. I go to the gym 3-4 times a week, do the weights, and 30 mins of cardio - I might even get in a few extras sessions of cardio per week. Why the fluctuation? Diet, specifically junk food and beer consumed during football and college basketball seasons. During the summer, I am a bit more active, but the main reason I am lighter in summertime is that I consume fewer calories per week. Trust me, they add up.

Posted by: maus92 | April 15, 2010 9:39 PM | Report abuse

I go up and down by 15 lbs. over the course of the year: lighter in the summer, heavier in the winter. I go to the gym 3-4 times a week, do the weights, and 30 mins of cardio - I might even get in a few extras sessions of cardio per week. Why the fluctuation? Diet, specifically junk food and beer consumed during football and college basketball seasons. During the summer, I am a bit more active, but the main reason I am lighter in summertime is that I consume fewer calories per week. Trust me, they add up.

Posted by: maus92 | April 15, 2010 9:40 PM | Report abuse

Some research may show that few people maintain weight loss solely with exercise, and other research may show that people who follow rigid dieting rules don't maintain weight loss, but what do those separate statements have to do with the general conclusion that eating less and exercising have no effect? I've maintained a weight 30lb lower than my high point for years now by making a permanent change to my exercise and eating habits. Every change starts out temporary before lasting long enough to be considered permanent, so it would be a shame to cut each temporary change in the bud. A more constructive approach might be to emphasize the difference between maintainable and un-maintainable lifestyle changes.

Posted by: emjameson | April 15, 2010 10:21 PM | Report abuse

This, of course, is entirely the point of the intuitive eating study, but the phrase at the beginning, "It's way too easy to believe that you can control your weight by watching your diet or exercising regularly" was a bit too general for me to see the contrast.

Posted by: emjameson | April 15, 2010 10:29 PM | Report abuse

Sadly, it simply is not the case that "listening to one's body" will lead to a healthier me. My body tells me that it is hungry all the time, to eat in large portions, even to eat during the night if I cannot sleep. To get healthier, which DOES include weight loss, I have to keep a focus on how much I have eaten throughout the day and over the week. Yes, balance is best but some self control is absolutely necessary. And getting into some sort of exercise program that you enjoy and get social interactions out of as well will complement the self control in eating. And think about it....with all the human diversity out there, distributions of various characteristics, etc.....how can it possibly be that each and every one of us possesses internal signals that are trying to guide us in the identical right direction, if only we could listen. how can we all be same on that dimension?
Finally, even if weight is not the sole predictor of health, it does matter. And it affects my mobility on the tennis court!
Two years ago I lost 30 pounds and while I quickly gained 10 pounds back, the other 20 have stayed off. Now I want a bit more off so that I can more comfortably engage in totally fun summer adventures like whitewater rafting in North Carolina and hiking in Vermont. My goal? It is a lifestyle thing. I think that is a healthy goal.

Posted by: JoanJohnson1 | April 15, 2010 11:13 PM | Report abuse

This junk science article is a sock puppet for the big media/consumption kabal that controls the US today.

It claims you that you can't do anything about it so you might as well enjoy being overweight.

First of all this is totally not true.

I lost 20 pounds ten years ago and it is still off. I weigh 145 and I exercise and eat 1600 calories a day and feel just great.

It's absurd to think that the human condition is pre-programmed to be overweight. At no time in history have human beings ever been as overweight as they are today.

Now here's what's really going on. Your body is needed for work and consumption to keep the fat cats richer, and they are fooling you.

People today are stressed out because they believe, poor suckers, all the stuff the big business media brokers tell them about how much they need money and influence and consumption to be happy. Because of that stress they can't diet.

What they really need to accept is not being overweight; that solves nothing. They need to accept the idea that you don't need to be rich and influential and drinking a latte to be happy.

Work less. Spend time with people you love. Demand less of yourself, and enjoy nature more. And you'll feel happier, and you won't need to stuff yourself so much to break the pressure.

Posted by: Jerusalimight | April 16, 2010 2:33 AM | Report abuse

I've been to both extremes: obese to health nut. I ended up in the middle. When I was extremely fit, people would actually touch me as if I were public property. I got lots of attention, dates and invitations. What I didn't find was happiness. I was just a fitter version with the same hang ups of the old fat me. I've learned to live and be happy at any size. I'm not as big as a house anymore but I won't be running a marathon either. I'm married and happy now. My weight fluctuates but I'm not a slave to it anymore.

Posted by: rcvinson64 | April 16, 2010 3:50 AM | Report abuse

25 years ago I lost 100 pounds in 8 months. I did this by listening to the Doctor that said you must loose 100 pounds or die. You have diabetes. Diet and exercise and fear. Today I do this yet less the fear.

Posted by: eaglehawkaroundsince1937 | April 16, 2010 5:11 AM | Report abuse

personally i find it offensive that the Post would "publish" this advertisement for this book.

if you love who you are and how much you weigh, power to you.

But please don't believe this nonsense that your body wants you to be fat.

i challenge you to find one overweight person who:
a) does manual labor for a living (farming, landscaping)
b) doesn't each processed food
c) doesn't eat at restaruants


we are fat because we don't exercise nearly enough.

we are fat because we eat food made in labs.

we are fat because our normal portions of food has grown.

we are fat because we eat at restaurants that don't watch our calories.

our bodies are machines. calories are fuel. if we have excess fuel, it's stored as fat.

Read Food Rules after your read this blog (please don't read this woman's book) and see which one sounds more true to you.

use your brain please!!!

this makes as much sense as eating 3 servings of bacon a day on the atkins diet.

Posted by: interestingidea1234 | April 16, 2010 6:29 AM | Report abuse

"
Alas, this column is placating garbage, and not worthy of a blog, let alone the Post. Please, readers, don't believe it. Diet and exercise work, and I have 20+ years of proof.

Posted by: Dodona

Agreed...

Posted by: beeker25"

And I agree also! The reason people lose weight (with healthy eating and exercise) is that for nearly everyone, it works. The reason they gain the weight back is that THEY STOP the healthy eating and exercise.

"Going on a diet" for a few months or a year or so will not result in permanent weight-loss. It takes permanent change to get permanent results.

Exercise alone won't work for most people.

I spent most of my life as an overweight person - only when I faced the fact that I had to make serious changes in my eating and exercising habits, and stick with those changes "forever", did I get results that have lasted for about ten years. I am just as determined now as I was when I started. I am close to 70 years old and in amazingly good health - I would not go back to my old habits for anything!

Everyone should face the fact that as you age, your metabolism slows down. If you don't make adjustments for that you will certainly gain weight.

Posted by: DESS1 | April 16, 2010 8:44 AM | Report abuse

This is absurd. I have no idea why this author would claim that a proper diet coupled with exercise "won't work." I have spent my entire adult life doing both and I am a size 2 50-something year old woman. It absolutely DOES work but it is a lifelong effort, not a "diet." Do not buy this book, just based on this article, it has to be total rubbish. Another example of saying, it's o'k! Be fat!

Posted by: petka | April 16, 2010 10:40 AM | Report abuse

Linda, your new age wackiness is just another way to keep people fat. Of course, diet and exercise can keep people thin. Have you ever seen a picture of a fat people in concentration camp? If you don't put the food in your mouth, the fat doesn't go on your body. Are there lots of people who are weak willed? Is your article just another rationalization to keep people fat? The answers are too obvious to need stating.

Posted by: billkistler | April 16, 2010 11:37 AM | Report abuse

I have to disagree. She may have a valid point based on scientific studies and what not, but I don't believe it is the case across the board.

I had always been overweight but in 2003 I adopted a vegetarian/vegan diet. Cutting out cheese led to great weight loss for me.

I also started on an exercise plan that includes weight lifting, yoga, running, swimming, and biking. Mind you I don't get to all of these things every week or every month, but I rotate through the activities pretty regularly.

I have kept the weight off for over 7 years and I don't plan on gaining it back.

Posted by: funkysmith | April 16, 2010 11:53 AM | Report abuse

I have to disagree. She may have a valid point based on scientific studies and what not, but I don't believe it is the case across the board.

I had always been overweight but in 2003 I adopted a vegetarian/vegan diet. Cutting out cheese led to great weight loss for me.

I also started on an exercise plan that includes weight lifting, yoga, running, swimming, and biking. Mind you I don't get to all of these things every week or every month, but I rotate through the activities pretty regularly.

I have kept the weight off for over 7 years and I don't plan on gaining it back.

Posted by: funkysmith | April 16, 2010 11:55 AM | Report abuse

This article is a bunch of baloney. I wonder why the post would allow it to be published?

Posted by: janouzpoha | April 16, 2010 12:28 PM | Report abuse

Just adding my story to others who've lost weight and kept it off through eating healthily and exercising. Not everyone's body fights their weight loss; it can stick long-term, if you commit to changing your lifestyle. I was overweight 4 1/2 years ago (5'4" and over 160 lbs). I started counting calories, eating more veggies/fruit/legumes/whole grains, and walking more, and I lost 40 pounds over 6 months. I now stay within a 10-pound weight range (so I've kept off at least 30 lbs for 4 years). It's hard to change your habits permanently, but it is doable.

Posted by: shantybird | April 16, 2010 4:35 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company