Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Column Archive |  On Twitter: J Huget and MisFits  |  Fitness & Nutrition News  |  RSS Feeds RSS Feed

Is that right? Mott's Medleys are magic

The peppy mom played by actress Marcia Cross in the TV ads for Mott's Medleys juices asserts that "Sometimes getting kids to eat the way they should requires a little magic from Mom."


Hmmm. I would counter that getting kids to eat the way they should requires a little effort from Mom (and Dad!) to teach kids to eat the way they should -- not just pour them a glass of juice blend and call it two servings of fruit/vegetables.

Mott's Medleys come in three varieties, apple, grape and "tropical." Depending on the variety, each 8-ounce glass has 110 or 140 calories, 100 percent of the DV for Vitamin C, and a bit of magnesium and Vitamin E. The Web site says they have no added sugars.


Mott's Medleys come in three varieties, apple, grape and "tropical." But for the same calories or fewer, you could offer your kid a fiber-rich fruit.

The juices contain no dietary fiber. For the same calories or fewer, you could offer your kid a fiber-rich orange, an apple or a banana, each of which contains a natural mix of vitamins and minerals. Any one of them would require chewing; none can easily be mindlessly gobbled or gulped. Your kid would likely feel full longer after eating the fruit than after drinking the juice. And you'd be teaching your kid to appreciate the taste and texture of real food -- an appreciation that will serve your child well for years to come.

Maddeningly, the TV ad shows kids frolicking outdoors, surrounded by crate after crate of gorgeous apples. There are apples strewn on the picnic table when the kids break for a snack -- of juice. Nary a child is shown eating an apple. I guess the fruit's just there for decoration.

Mott's Medleys' tag line -- "Invisible vegetables. Magical taste." -- is another example of the food industry's trying to convince consumers that they may as well throw up their hands and give up trying to get kids to eat actual fruits and vegetables. I resent that, and I think you should, too.

On the other hand, if you buy into that premise, here's a suggestion: Serve your kid a bowl of Chef Boyardee and a glass of Mott's Medleys juice. He'll get three of the day's 4½ servings of fruits and vegetables without ever having to lay eyes on an actual fruit or vegetable.

By Jennifer LaRue Huget  | September 24, 2010; 7:00 AM ET
Categories:  Childhood obesity, Is That Right?, Kids' health, Nutrition and Fitness, Obesity  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: CDC: One in five sexually active gay urban men has HIV
Next: Do abortions cause depression?

Comments

Amen. I've seen both these commercials (Motts and Chef Boyardee) and both make me cringe. Commercials such as these not only teach parents to avoid feeding kids real veggies, they also teach kids that they're not supposed to like real veggies.

Moreover, both commercials imply that parents should sneak around and trick their kids into eating veggies. Since when is this the right approach? My parents taught me that eating veggies is important by making me eat my veggies. Simple. Now I'm a healthy adult who enjoys eating her veggies.

Posted by: mountainstategal | September 24, 2010 1:07 PM | Report abuse

My grandchildren live with my husband and I along with their parents. My DIL is of the "junk food" mindset. That's what she likes and says that's what the kids like. Funny though, I cut up fresh fruit, vegetables and frequently make hard-boiled eggs. My grandkids always clamor for these snacks. My conclusion: If you build it, they will come.

Posted by: georgettec28 | September 24, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

My grandchildren live with my husband and I along with their parents. My DIL is of the "junk food" mindset. That's what she likes and says that's what the kids like. Funny though, I cut up fresh fruit, vegetables and frequently make hard-boiled eggs. My grandkids always clamor for these snacks. My conclusion: If you build it, they will come.

Posted by: georgettec28 | September 24, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

The point is made about drinking the juice as opposed to eating the fruit.

But another point might be made: the juice can be the drink with one's meal (instead of soda pop?). And the meal can include as healthy a variety of foods as one would like.

Posted by: paultaylor1 | September 24, 2010 10:40 PM | Report abuse

hello everyone,im wholesale supplier online

Welcome to our website

===== http://www.shoes3.us/ =======

accept paypal or credit card and free shipping

We need your support and trust!!!

Dear friends, please temporarily stop your footsteps

To our website Walk around A look at

Maybe you'll find happiness in your sight shopping heaven and earth

You'll find our price is more suitable for you.

===== http://www.shoes3.us/ ========

Posted by: shoestrade28 | September 24, 2010 10:51 PM | Report abuse

Their ridiculous and deceptive advertising practices aside, anyone with any sort of social consciousness should BOYCOTT Mott's and all the rest of the products manufactured by Dr. Pepper/Snapple.

Despite record profits, they are demanding give-backs by their employees, not just in benefits like health insurance and vacation time, but by accepting actual pay REDUCTIONS. They justify their unbridled greed and abuse of their employees because Mott's is located in Rochester, N.Y., a town particularly hard-hit during the economic downturn because of the technology-driven contractions of their three other major employers, Kodak, Xerox and Polaroid. Because their community has undergone severe disruption as their older technologies have been replaced by newer, often foreign-manufactured replacement, they have decided to hit the community even harder by these heinous demands.

DO NOT BUY MOTT'S or anything else from its parent -- the source of this greed -- Texas's Dr. Pepper/Snapple.

Posted by: FergusonFoont | September 25, 2010 9:51 AM | Report abuse

Yup. You nailed it.
Also, reading Barry Sears book is 100 times healthier than perusing your Readers Digest filler copy.

Posted by: craigslsst | September 25, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

Have you tasted what they are passing off as fruit in the groceries.
It is a bite of chemically tasting stuff with a trace of fruit flavor.

The good juices are picked at the right time and squeezed. Mix in some Psyillium. Psyillium. If you want fiber.

Posted by: wpmars | September 25, 2010 4:14 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company