Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Class Struggle: January 9, 2011 - January 15, 2011

Increasing learning time with free breakfasts

Some people think it's wrong to read at the table. The Mathews family has a different view. We talk to each other at meals if the mood strikes us. But much of the time, particularly at breakfast and lunch, we are looking at newspapers and magazines, and sometimes even books, while ingesting carbohydrates, fats and whatever else tastes good. I know, it sounds rude. But it is a habit that more Americans, particularly younger ones, should adopt.

By Jay Mathews  | January 14, 2011; 5:30 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (24)
Categories:  Trends  | Tags:  000 more students got free breakfasts last year, 663, Food Research and Action Center, National School Lunch Program, combine reading with eating and learning time increases, free breakfasts more common in schools  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Can we measure school climate?

I have been wondering about our failure to measure some of the most important school issues for our children since my newspaper recently published misleading safety indicators put out by D.C. public schools. A chart said Spingarn High School had only six security incidents in four months of 2009, way below the city average of 31, even though Spingarn teachers were reporting so much disruption at that time that the principal was fired because of it.

By Jay Mathews  | January 12, 2011; 8:00 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (23)
Categories:  Local Living  | Tags:  Dick Reed, Donna Wright, Steve Peha, distortions in D.C. security report figures, measuring if students feel differently at different schools, more student and teacher surveys needed, school climate, such data could however mean bad news  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Obama on No Child Left Behind: Get me rewrite

My colleague Nick Anderson reported today that President Obama has green-lighted another attempt to revise the No Child Left Behind education law. Here is a guest item on this development from The Post's national education writer. Every year since 2007,...

By Washington Post editors  | January 12, 2011; 11:25 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (14)
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Does KIPP shed too many low-performers?

My colleague Valerie Strauss, creator and proprietor of the fabulous The Answer Sheet blog on this Web site, encouraged recently a spirited debate over attrition rates at the KIPP schools. I wrote my last book, "Word Hard. Be Nice" about the birth and growth of KIPP, the charter school network most successful in raising student achievement. Here is how the debate played out, and my reaction to it.

By Jay Mathews  | January 10, 2011; 6:16 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (14)
Categories:  Jay on the Web  | Tags:  Jonathan Cowan, KIPP, KIPP attrition rates, KIPP taking over a regular school, Richard Kahlenberg, Steve Mancini  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

Learning inspired by teacher and textbook errors

The controversy over errors in Virginia history books, well covered by my colleague Kevin Sieff, reminds me of the best day I ever had in high school. It makes me wonder whether the delights of detecting errors by authoritative educators and their textbooks might turn the scandal into ways to make history classes, at least in high school, more exciting than they are now.

By Jay Mathews  | January 9, 2011; 8:00 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (8)
Categories:  Metro Monday  | Tags:  Al Ladendorff, Hillsdale High School, Kevin Sieff, Virginia textbook errors, conceptual errors also a source for learning, let students identify errors  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz  

 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company