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Posted at 12:35 PM ET, 01/ 5/2011

Iraq vet barred from Baltimore community college over essay on killing

By Daniel de Vise

A Iraq war veteran barred from attending the Community College of Baltimore County over an essay he wrote called "War is a Drug" says he has given up trying to re-enroll, according to a story in the Baltimore Sun.

Charles Whittington of Baltimore was restricted from the campus after his essay was published in the Oct. 26 edition of the campus newspaper. It said killing was "something I really need so I can feel like myself," according to the Sun account.

The college sought a psychological evaluation as a condition of Whittington's return. Whittington delivered one, but college officials said the documents had to come directly from his evaluator, according to the article.

Now, Whittington says he's fed up: "I've done everything they asked me to do, and now they want more," he told the Sun.

Whittington served as an infantryman in Iraq from 2006 to early 2008 and came home "after a roadside explosion left him unconscious for days," the article states.

He told the newspaper he is considering legal action and may transfer to Anne Arundel Community College to continue his education.

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By Daniel de Vise  | January 5, 2011; 12:35 PM ET
Categories:  Administration, Community Colleges, Litigation  | Tags:  CCBC veteran essay, Iraq veteran barred from college, Iraq veteran essay community college, veteran barred from community college, veteran essay killing  
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Comments

Safety first. It may be unfair to this former serviceman, but the college's position does not seen unreasonable to me.

Posted by: krickey7 | January 5, 2011 1:56 PM | Report abuse

I agree with krickey7. No one should feel that killing is something they "need".

Posted by: HappyArmyWife | January 5, 2011 2:04 PM | Report abuse

He had the required psychological evaluation done and delivered to the college directly from the evaluator.Why is this a problem? The evaluation should have come directly from the evaluator!
I hope this young man does well at AAMC-It's a better school anyway!!

Posted by: 10bestfan | January 5, 2011 2:50 PM | Report abuse

So we're now penalizing people, particularly War Vets for expression one of the most basic and fundamental freedoms?

I don't like the military, and I hate war, but to disenfranchise a for veteran for being candid about his experiences on the battlefield amounts to censorship.

Does the school require psychological evaluations of all of its students? faculty? This is a big hub ub about nothing, but I certainly hope he chooses to seek remedy for the school's ill treatment of him.

The ACLU should be begging to represent this man.

Posted by: BLKManCommonSense | January 5, 2011 3:26 PM | Report abuse

So we're now penalizing people, particularly War Vets for expression one of the most basic and fundamental freedoms?

I don't like the military, and I hate war, but to disenfranchise a veteran for being candid about his experiences on the battlefield amounts to censorship.

Does the school require psychological evaluations of all of its students? faculty? This is a big hub ub about nothing, but I certainly hope he chooses to seek remedy for the school's ill treatment of him.

The ACLU should be begging to represent this man.

Posted by: BLKManCommonSense | January 5, 2011 3:28 PM | Report abuse

I'm all for freedom of speech and for veterans getting all manner of benefit for their service. However, and without benefit of reading the entire essay, I certainly agree that the college's response to the 'need to kill' statement is appropriate.

This veteran can sign a very limited release allowing his 'evaluator' to send the report directly to CCBC. That he apparently has declined to do so is all the more suspect.

Posted by: sheckycat | January 5, 2011 4:37 PM | Report abuse

Agree with every poster here except BLKManCommonSense. Sorry, but I would not want this young man on campus with me or anyone else. If he is so hell bent on continuing is education, he should do it online.

Posted by: gladiatorgal | January 5, 2011 5:49 PM | Report abuse

I understand there are those of us out there that will see this, and feel that veterans are being mistreated by the powers that be. The truth of the mater is that the administrators were not the ones who spoke out against this article. It was Mr. Whittingtons fellow Combat Veterans, who brought this matter to the attention of the rest of the school.

We are not talking about someone who has an addiction to lollipops and teddy bears. We are referring to someone who admitting has an addiction to murdering human beings. Then uses a racial slur to describe who he like killing most.

The veterans community at the college has extended our arms to him. Offered him help with whatever it is he needs help with. He rather ride out his 15 minutes then to actually get assistance with finishing his education here.

I have never heard of a veteran who was in college, and could not walk circles around psych evalvs, when we needed to. For Dr. Lilley to request reports prior to the spotlight being shined on him, only makes sense to me.

He has already admitted to fabricating parts of his story. If that is the kind of veteran he is, then at the end of the day we don't want him back on campus. Good Luck at Anne Arundel Community College.

Posted by: CCBC-WarVet | January 6, 2011 1:52 PM | Report abuse

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