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Posted at 6:00 AM ET, 12/ 9/2008

The Morning Line: Strong Stomachs Required

By Michael Cavna

From probed eyeballs to ailing tootsies, today's funnies aren't for the squeamish.

Before you dig into "The Piranha Club," for instance, you might wanna finish breakfast.

Somehow, waxing on about ingrown toenails -- let alone brain surgery via the femoral artery -- might make that bagel-and-scrambies a little less appetizing. Unless you're a medical professional, of course -- I've got a few in my family, and such talk only seems to enhance their dining experience.

Similarly sporting denuded feet is "Agnes," in which Agnes is up for a gentle massage of her sizable grape-stompers.


(Creators) Enlarge Comic

Yow. Yet again, I recommend setting aside your hash browns for the time being.

Also rearing its head is "Zippy the Pinhead," in which our mortality-mulling clown, stripped down to his skivvies, is learning from his nurse that he has "th' eyeballs of a fifteen-year-old."

Yeesh. Put DOWN the Denver omelette.

Also flashing an ocular fixation is "Lio," as our fave goth-tyke retrieves a Titleist for the cyclopping zombie.

So what's our Breakfast Gross-Out Warning Label for today's "Lio"? There is none -- I laughed out loud without even pausing before wolfing down my Wheaties.

ELSEWHERE 'ROUND THE PAGE...


(Marvel/KFS) Enlarge Comic

In "The Amazing Spider-Man," don't miss that telltale note on Maria's desk. And I can't hep but marvel: What are the odds that Maria's handwriting would be so uncannily similar to the Spidey artist's balloon lettering. Amazing, that.

By Michael Cavna  | December 9, 2008; 6:00 AM ET
Categories:  The Morning Line  
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Next: The Riff: All Politics Is Loco--and Amusingly So

Comments

This morning, some of the WaPo comics seem to require a registration at comics.com to see them, and the registration requires a country when the pull-down list empty. Is anyone else having this problem?

Posted by: tws1372 | December 9, 2008 8:59 AM | Report abuse

I still don't get the Piranha Club, even after four years of reading it (I hadn't seen it before I moved to Washington). I cringed at the colagen injections from the last couple days, too. Is there something about this doctor that's supposed to be funny? And what about that woman who cooks octopus every day? I'm clearly missing something in this strip.

Posted by: oceanchild | December 9, 2008 10:22 AM | Report abuse

I'm just marveling that someone actually reads through all the dialogue in "Agnes" or "Zippy."

Posted by: tomtildrum | December 9, 2008 11:21 AM | Report abuse

I think one of the premises of Piranha Club is that life is never kind to any of the characters. The octopus? 1) Effie is perhaps the world's worst cook, and 2) Sid is so cheap he eats it because it's free. In fact Sid's cheapness - along with his sidekicks at The Piranha Club - is perhaps THE major premise of the strip. The doctor? malpractice in action every day. The collogan injections? Talk about cosmetic surgery gone bad.... even at two attempts the doctor couldn't hit his lips.

Posted by: tws1372 | December 9, 2008 12:32 PM | Report abuse

oceanchild wrote in part: "I still don't get the Piranha Club... that woman who cooks octopus every day? I'm clearly missing something in this strip" I don't think you're missing anything - that's pretty much it.

tomtildrum wrote: "I'm just marveling that someone actually reads through all the dialogue in 'Agnes' or 'Zippy'" I am one of those Zippy readers :) I love that strip although I think it's kind of an acquired taste. Perhaps because I'm old enough to have enjoyed "underground comics" back in the 60's and 70's, where Zippy got its start. I try to get Agnes sometimes but it just doesn't work for me all the time. I used to see it in the NY Daily News which was a guilty pleasure for me. I stopped reading the News when it went from 50c to 75c locally (Washington DC).

BTW Baldo is really cool today (12/09). No dialog, after the last few days of bitter disappointment at the auto parts store, where our hard working protagonist has been passed over for a promotion. The new job of asst manager has been given to a goof off because the boss knows he's worthless on the sales floor and Baldo does the work of two so he stays. Wow, that coincides with my experience at work :) Started in '68 and saw a once excellent enterprise slowly decline as the supervisor positions were given to the poor workers for the same reason. Those bums eventually rose to the top and the whole thing went south. But I digress... the quiet Baldo strip today, with the wooly bear, the striking frame angles, the wind and the few leaves, is great!

Another life like comics. I too have a tiny dark spot on a finger where a little bit of .005 pencil lead resides, just like Earl Pickles :) I also have another on a finger where grease from a 1972 Toyota motor resides from a busted knuckle way back then :)

Posted by: hdradio | December 9, 2008 1:02 PM | Report abuse

Hey tws1372, I was writing while you were. Didn't want you to think I was commenting on your post :) Cheers, hdr

Posted by: hdradio | December 9, 2008 1:05 PM | Report abuse

hdradio - no offense taken. With many strips, it's the perspective that makes it enjoyable. For example: for me, Bucky Katt is a dead-ringer for my oldest brother. Each one reinforces that image in my mind on a regular basis. It adds a whole new layer of fun in reading it.

Posted by: tws1372 | December 9, 2008 2:09 PM | Report abuse

Yea, Baldo was really touching today. As lousy as he felt, it showed he's basically a good kid, and couldn't talk out his anger/disappointment on even a bug.

Be interesting to see how Bernice reacts to this.

Posted by: joe_s | December 9, 2008 6:03 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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