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Posted at 5:56 PM ET, 02/15/2011

What happened to Lara Logan was unacceptable

By Alexandra Petri

Usually, this is a humor blog. But this is not funny.

CBS News reported today that on Friday in Cairo, as news of Mubarak's resignation flooded the crowd, reporter Lara Logan was assaulted: "In the crush of the mob, she was separated from her crew. She was surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers."

This sort of story has a pernicious staying power: Not a faceless statistic, but a known, blonde, white woman.

Fortunately or unfortunately, these are the stories that linger. They take up space in the public mind, and swell to elephantine proportions in the course of debate.

It is always dangerous to extrapolate too much from a particular story. But this is already beginning to happen, and I think two points bear keeping in mind.

They are the acts of an isolated group of individuals.

But when we contemplate the statistics and the experience of women in this culture, we have to ask: how isolated?

Egypt is not a free society. Yes, it is free of Mubarak's rule. But its women - even when shrouded in the hejab - are not free to pass through the street without being groped and catcalled. In 2008, as Slate reporter Sarah Topol noted, a study by the Egyptian Centre for Women's Rights reported that 83 percent of women experienced harassment - and that 98 percent of foreign women visitors did. And 62 percent of men admitted to perpetrating it. Living in the United States, I take for granted my ability to walk unmolested in the street. I don't believe this could have happened here. And the idea that such a horror could take place in the midst not of pervasive violence but of celebration is especially shocking.

Yes, this is only one vivid and shocking incident. And one bright spot in this bleak narrative is that it was Egyptian women who helped rescue her. But there is still a long way to go.

It is not cultural imperialism to state that women have the right not to be assaulted, regardless of race, creed, or country.

Journalists run many risks. It comes with the profession. But this should not be silently accepted as one of them. My thoughts and prayers are with Lara Logan. It took great courage for her to make this story public, and I wish her a speedy recovery.

By Alexandra Petri  | February 15, 2011; 5:56 PM ET
Categories:  Petri  | Tags:  Egypt, Lara Logan  
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Comments


Ms.Logan is one of the best reporters going but nevertheless, I don't feel it is smart to place women in barbaric places like the mid east. As much as I admire her reporting skills I don't think it is worth the risk she took to be in such an uncontrolled mob of people that have basically no regard for women.

The idea that all cultures are equally valid is so much horse patoot.

A woman as experienced and world wise as Lara Logan should refuse assignment overseas unless she is in the middle of a U S Armed Forces company.

May God speed your recovery Ms. Logan.

Posted by: jstratt2 | February 15, 2011 7:45 PM | Report abuse

The question is what we should do about it? I would like to drop a bomb on Mecca to punish those savages.

Posted by: danredmondfootball | February 15, 2011 7:47 PM | Report abuse

This saddened me, that women, especially an obvious foreigner, are not safe to wander at will as we here in the US are. My wishes for a speedy recovery, altho' it is obvious that the worst scars will be the ones you cannot see.

I do hope that the countries in the Mid-East catch up to us in regards to treatment of women. That, unfortunately, may take a long time.

Posted by: ohnooo | February 15, 2011 7:48 PM | Report abuse

"a known, blonde, white woman."

Stay classy Petri.

Posted by: FrancisMacomber | February 15, 2011 7:56 PM | Report abuse

With the exception of certain urban enclaves on both coasts of the United States, we have long known that women are treated quite differently in Islamic cultures. Those differences range from subjugation to outright abuse to murder.

I do not mean to make light of what happened to Ms. Logan, but for you to act as if suprised by it is beyond the pale.
You feign ignorance hoping it will absolve your responsibilty for not reporting the truth about Islam.

Posted by: V1VRV2 | February 15, 2011 7:56 PM | Report abuse

I hate to say it, but catcalls and harassment are not exclusive to the Middle East. I've been subjected to both walking down the streets in African and Latin American cities. Its a remnant of an antiquated attitude towards women that has no place in this 21st century world.

Posted by: aerm0911 | February 15, 2011 8:04 PM | Report abuse

Hey FrancisMacomber- curious why it was not "classy" for Petri to report that Logan is a blonde, white woman? That is the integral part of the story and in fact, why she was raped.

You must be used to being lied to, but the truth is a cold, hard smack in the face.

Posted by: danredmondfootball | February 15, 2011 8:05 PM | Report abuse

What's wrong with the story.
CBS advocates beating of women(Charlie Sheen)
They approve of solicitation of women. (Charlie Sheen)
They approve of their people doing drugs like Cocaine, (Charlie Sheen)
So the reporter was raped..No problem for CBS.
They will by her flowers and tell to go to work.
Where are the women's organizations when it come to the scum liberal crowd.
No Where. Again Sorry CBS reporter but good for you for working for an organization who care more about dogs then women..

Posted by: dbonade | February 15, 2011 8:07 PM | Report abuse


Every woman I know who's visited Egypt has complained of the blatant public gropings that occur constantly. There's obviously something corrosive about Arab culture and/or islam that makes these men horribly abusive and violent to women.

With that said, the fact that CBS sent a 115 pound pretty blond girl to wander about the streets with the violently rioting locals is outrageous.

Posted by: scoob2012 | February 15, 2011 8:09 PM | Report abuse

"This sort of story has a pernicious staying power: Not a faceless statistic, but a known, blonde, white woman."

Why is it significant that she is a blonde white woman. Would the story be less pernicious or have less staying power if she were not blonde and white?

A stupid comment.

Posted by: vernedwards | February 15, 2011 8:12 PM | Report abuse

The middle east is not entirely "barbaric" doh doh brain. How barbaric of you to classify an entire region. In the States, women can be treated in a similar manner if there were riots of the same nature, there are too many uneducated and sick men in our society and abroad...why is that? Aside from your reasons, which I can agree with of course, WE as a western society TOLERATE it.

As much as I think Lara Logan is a low quality journalist -- who isn't that hot to begin with in my op, she of course didn't deserve what happened to her. It's down right pathetic in any region. Thank goodness there were women and some decent men to help her.

Posted by: djeanniemeyer | February 15, 2011 8:12 PM | Report abuse

"Unacceptable" is a bit of an understatement. Yet people wonder why these countries need authoritarian governments.

Posted by: GSI1 | February 15, 2011 8:17 PM | Report abuse

A disgusting act perpetrated by men living with medieval mindsets...and these are the type of people we are trying to win the hearts and minds of? Lets get out of the middle east...they do not share our values...it sounds like they are very far away from having a modern mindset. Perhaps we should cutoff aid to Egypt until the military can deliver the attackers to the US for proper punishment...

Posted by: Jim31 | February 15, 2011 8:19 PM | Report abuse

In Muslim cultures, I think they call the type of treatment Ms. Logan received a "honeymoon".

Posted by: ADNova | February 15, 2011 8:22 PM | Report abuse

test

Posted by: djeanniemeyer | February 15, 2011 8:24 PM | Report abuse

I think we should get the whole story before we start jumping to conclusions. People are confusing "Sexual assault" with "rape". There were probaly some rowdy characters there and they may have groped her, she may have slapped them and they may have punched her but i think some people have the image of her being dragged to a abandoned building and raped. Before we what happened to her i think we should get the whole story and i appriciate Alexandra Petri for not doing what other blogs are and reporting hearsay.

Posted by: dusty_chin | February 15, 2011 8:25 PM | Report abuse

Ditto about "Unacceptable" in the title. I was just about to post about it. The blogger is a woman at that. What an idiot. I guess the next time she gets grabbed by some scummie loser who can't get laid..she'll yelp out "that is so unacceptable!"

Posted by: djeanniemeyer | February 15, 2011 8:26 PM | Report abuse

do we know what actually happened? given the ambiguity of the release and American sensitivities around "sexual assault" and a "known, blonde, white woman", this report could simply mean she was punched and groped. if she was gang raped by a crowd of men, that's horrible. but please tell us the facts and don't be lascivious and illusive in your reporting.

Posted by: ironmange | February 15, 2011 8:27 PM | Report abuse

That's Islam. Coming to a U.S. city near you.. soon...within the next generation.

Posted by: Mainer1776 | February 15, 2011 8:32 PM | Report abuse

@vernedwards a

Being a blonde woman is more dangerous in Egypt simply because you stand out amongst thousands of arab and african women who are covered. People would be just as outraged if the reporter was a black or hispanic woman, so don't get excited. Have you even read the US state departments warnings on travel to Egypt? Sexual assault of tourists in public is a known problem.

Posted by: scoob2012 | February 15, 2011 8:34 PM | Report abuse

I think its worth noting that this sort of attack does happen in the United States, too. I have lived in a Middle Eastern country and experienced the constant harassment, but I have also received that same humiliating, disturbing harassment at home. It is unacceptable that this happened to Ms. Logan, and I am glad a discussion is being had about sexual assault and rape. But previous comments about the barbarism of middle eastern culture ignore the 1/6 (likely more, given poor reporting) of American women who have suffered sexual violence. Like me. This is not an isolated occurrence.

Posted by: sunflowerseeds | February 15, 2011 8:35 PM | Report abuse

Are you kidding dusty_chin?? "People are confusing "Sexual assault" with "rape"." Since you obviously don't know what you're talking about, let me clue you in....ANY inappropriate touching or rape of a woman is sexual assault. And there is NO SUCH THING as one type of attack being less bad than another type. This woman will live with emotional scars for the rest of her life! It's opinions like yours that help to tarnish society so issues like this lose their urgency and get swept under the carpet. And the second class treatment of women continues. Americans have no right to point the finger at other countries either, OUR women here at home are getting sexually assaulted just as frequently as women in other countries. Many people just choose to avoid listening to the news and reading the statistics.

Posted by: Bttrflyadr | February 15, 2011 8:37 PM | Report abuse

CBS is reporting her attack as a sexual assault using information provided by her and her CBS crew. The attack was on Friday. There is no hyperbole here. CBS is not generally prone to exaggeration on subjects like this.

She was a single woman traveling uncovered in a muslim country. The action of these attackers was permissible and encouraged in Islam. If she were in Iran she would have been arrested after the attack and be facing the death penalty for adultery.

Islam is a peaceful religion. If you disagree muslims will kill you and rape your women.

Posted by: adolphemenjou | February 15, 2011 8:45 PM | Report abuse

Gee, bttrflyadr, I'd think the difference between getting groped and getting raped us pretty large, just in terms of the potential health consequences. Do you think there should be no legal difference?

Posted by: FrederickMichael | February 15, 2011 8:48 PM | Report abuse

Posters stop trying to minimize what was described as a brutal sexual assault... upon her return to America... it is reported by the 60 Minutes site that she was hospitalized. A simple grope it was not.

I should note.. her last picture before the attack showed her with her hair and head uncovered... shoulder-length and blonde.

Another pretty blonde reporter CNN Darwa always seems to have her head covered when she is in public.

Her crew and Team made a HUGE mistake. Egypt is largely Islamic and women are oppressed there as elsewhere in the Islamic world.

Former Egyptian Muslim Noni Darwish notes Muslim men may have 4 full-time wives and one temporary wife for 1 hour at a time (allowing of course for prostitution)

Posted by: pvilso24 | February 15, 2011 8:49 PM | Report abuse

I agree with everything you say except this: "I don't believe this could have happened here." These sorts of things happen to women in the United States quite frequently. You might not hear about them because they're not happening to famous journalists, but plenty of women suffer these sorts of heinous attacks in the United States all the time.

Posted by: Kate68 | February 15, 2011 8:49 PM | Report abuse

@Bttrflyadr No your wrong. Sexual assault and rape are two diffent things. You can grab someone's brest and your gonna get a sexual assault charge. And if she was raped (In the middle of Tehrir square)There is no doubt that such a severe act would have been reported earlier. And there would have to be video because there was survelece and cameras everywhere that day.I'm not saying what happened wasn't terrible but people are automatically linking sexual assault with rape and those are two diffent things.

Posted by: dusty_chin | February 15, 2011 8:51 PM | Report abuse

Joys of Muslim Women by Nonie Darwish (former Muslim, Gazan, and daughter of an Egyptian Shahid (martyr)):

“In the Muslim faith a Muslim man can marry a child as young as 7, consummating the marriage by 9. The dowry is given to the family in exchange for the woman (who becomes his slave) and for the purchase of the private parts of the woman, to use her as a toy

“To prove rape, the woman must have (4) male witnesses. Often after a woman has been raped the family has the right to execute her (an honor killing) to restore the honor of the family. Husbands can beat their wives 'at will' and the man does not have to say why he has beaten her.

“The husband is permitted to have 4 wives and a temporary wife for an hour (prostitute) at his discretion.

“The Shariah Muslim law controls the private as well as the public life of the woman.

“In the Western World ( America ) Muslim men are starting to demand Shariah Law so the wife can not obtain a divorce and he can have full and complete control of her. It is alarming how many of our sisters and daughters attending US and Canadian Universities are now marrying Muslim men and submitting themselves and their children unsuspectingly to the Shariah law.

“By passing this on, enlightened US and Canadian women may avoid becoming a slave under Shariah Law.

Ripping the West in Two. Author and lecturer Nonie Darwish says the goal of radical Islamists is to impose Shariah law on the world, ripping Western law and liberty in two.

Posted by: pvilso24 | February 15, 2011 8:53 PM | Report abuse

Wasn't last Friday the same day that President Obama single handedly saved Egypt?

Wow, what a terrible coincidence. I hope she is ok.

You know maybe if the mainstream media reported actual news (instead of serving up a non stop stream of White House PR), these terrible stats would be common knowledge here, and maybe female journalists wouldn't have known not to bother going there to wave pom-poms in such a dangerous place?

Posted by: shanimal | February 15, 2011 8:58 PM | Report abuse

@Bttrflyadr Sexual assault is offensive touching. If you grab someones breast it it sexual assault. I'm not saying that it isn't terrible but CBS said sexual assault and everyone is reporting she was raped.

Posted by: dusty_chin | February 15, 2011 9:00 PM | Report abuse

Ghastly story, but why is anyone surprised that a bunch of Muslim misogynists would gang rape an infidel woman? Under Sharia, it's the woman's fault anyway.

Posted by: joanne600 | February 15, 2011 9:01 PM | Report abuse

Just more lawless whackos. Has nothing to do with religion or culture. Yah right. The CBS suits should be held criminally liable!

Posted by: hughglass | February 15, 2011 9:06 PM | Report abuse

@pivilso24 Just because she was hospitalized doesn't mean she was raped. It says she was beaten, maybe that is why she was hospitalized. Maybe she twisted her ankle trying to get the hell out of there. And it also doesn't say if she's still there or when she got there. No one really knows to much about this story. Wait for the facts before you start rumors

Posted by: dusty_chin | February 15, 2011 9:17 PM | Report abuse

Islam is a religion of peace! How can you people be so judgmental?

CAIR will be the first to say Logan deserved this treatment for not wearing a hejab or even better, a burkha!

Posted by: NyallsStJohnSmytheIV | February 15, 2011 9:19 PM | Report abuse

You don't believe it could happen here? It has already happened here, also in the midst of celebration: the Puerto Rican Pride parade in 2000 and Seattle’s Mardi Gras celebration/riot in 2001. These weren't obscure incidents. A photo of a woman who was being held down and violently assaulted by a dozen men in the Mardi Gras riot was awarded the National Press Photographers Association Best of Photojournalism.

This is not to diminish what happened to Ms. Logan, nor downplay the problems that women face in more repressive societies. But the effort to understand why these kinds of attacks occur and how to prevent them will be fruitless if we pretend they only happen in other cultures.

Posted by: nonpareil_b5 | February 15, 2011 9:34 PM | Report abuse

Ms Logan is a well know blonde white woman who has loose morals and a documented family wrecker. Maybe peaceful Moslems with good morals are offended by her presence.

Posted by: FreedomFighter1 | February 15, 2011 9:42 PM | Report abuse

The article aims at raising attention to the violent and oppressive reality that women face on the streets of Cairo. The article creates the impression, however, that violence, sexual assault, rape, objectification of women, etc., are unique to Cairo and not endemic of the modern world. Such a tendentious approach and article does an injustice to the difficulties and violence that women around the world face by neglecting to mention the fact that such acts of violence are also common in the US on college campuses, in the work place, during celebrations, on the streets, by relatives, etc. What we have is a simplistic and highly problematic image of Cairo that tacitly reaffirms the widespread belief (see the reductionist and essentialist views about Islam in the comments) that the Middle East (read Egypt here) is a barbaric region that is unfit for self rule.

Posted by: MuratCihan | February 15, 2011 9:56 PM | Report abuse

Who the hell is freedomfighter1?

Posted by: sunflowerseeds | February 15, 2011 10:09 PM | Report abuse

Under Sharia law, this type of incident will not be tolerated. It's the woman's fault to let men assault her and she brought shame to her family and should be stoned to death.

News flash: Islam and Sharia law are coming to a city near you in US, within this century or so, probably a lot sooner for Europe. The so called "moderate Muslim" is an oxymoron, all Muslims want Sharia law when they are in charge. In a democratic system, it's actually going to be easier: a simple majority will do. And with high birth rate and multiple wives, it's just a matter of time.

Posted by: citislicker | February 16, 2011 12:39 AM | Report abuse

I posted this on my facebook as soon as I heard the news earlier this evening. My very raw & immediate thoughts and feelings. I'm posting it here exactly as I posted it on my facebook:
"As I watched her last report (from the square) I remember feeling the threat. It should put any human but specially men and more specially Middle Eastern men and even more so Muslim men into deep shame and face each and every one of us with a massive question mark as to WHY this kind of thing still happens. We are in the 21st one now.
I blame a huge part of it on religion, the other on the image West (the advertising industry, etc) has created of Western women in the world.

I love women and I'm not ashamed of saying it: I'm in tears at this very moment (and I better pull myself together because I have a client arriving any minute now)..."

Posted by: touchisart | February 16, 2011 12:42 AM | Report abuse

@ Frederick Michael & dusty_chin: It is all violence, and ALL of these crimes should be harshly punished. This wasn't just a case of being at a dance club, someone grabbed her toosh and then she slapped their hand away. They said the assault was sustained, which to me says "prolongingly groped". And she was beaten. Nobody has the right to put their hands on anybody else without that person's consent. I get what you're saying about the technical difference between the two types of assault. But speaking from personal experience, I think the punishment needs to become harsher. Regardless of the severity of the crime. Society needs to learn this is unacceptable.

Posted by: Bttrflyadr | February 16, 2011 12:43 AM | Report abuse

I would like to humbly add to the conversation that I am a white American woman who has lived in Egypt in the past year. I experienced verbal sexual harassment on the street every single day I was there.

I wore conservative clothing, spoke in Arabic (which I am studying) and did not draw attention to myself -- I hope to be a responsible ambassador for the US. This is a huge problem that has worsened in the last 30 years. In my experience, I felt very gendered in nearly every interaction I had in a way that made me sick. Those were average interactions on the street -- it was a very different case with my friends.

I also made wonderful Egyptian friends, male and female, burka-wearers, bikini-wearers, engineering students, jewelry designers .. all kinds of people. One of my friends runs an NGO for women's health, another studies the role of humor in ancient hieroglyphic writings, another is a tennis pro. These are lovely, normal people. I like giving specific examples so people understand that these are real people you could relate to.

Egypt is a country with so many treasures, from ancient temples to contemporary philanthropic organizations and rich traditions.

If you took a bit of time and read parts of the Koran - come on, everyone knows stuff gets twisted in the media! - read it for yourself! Try tanzil.net for an English translation. That's Islam. So yeah, its a bunch of stories and traditions, like the Bible. Islam isn't only sharia, or only sufism, or only radical. Neither is Christianity just one thing.

I'm appreciative of the comments saying this could happen/has happened in the US... yeah it does happen here. It happens everywhere. But this isn't about the US- this specific case is SO IMPORTANT because all the world is watching Egypt right now.

This is INCREDIBLY BAD for Egypt's image, which has been looking good on some fronts lately- what with passionate, freedom-loving citizens, courageous Arab reporters, and a huge public will towards liberation.

I saw some women on the news in Cairo protesting last week with signs for an anti-harassment law. This NEEDS to be part of the reforms Egypt makes in this revolution. They cannot win international respect without putting this on the NATIONAL AGENDA. It needs to be integrated into the Tourism Department agenda, the Women's Rights agenda, and the Foreign Affairs Administration agenda.

There was a great public ad campaign a few years ago with posters saying
"Your Mom. (could be the one getting harassed.) Be a real man."
Wow! I'd love to see more campaigns like this! Guilt people out of doing these horrible things.

All I can add is that I left Egypt feeling very offended by this treatment-- not as a foreigner, as a woman, or as an American. I felt offended as a human being. I sincerely sympathize with women in Egypt who live this

But I will not sympathize with my generations counterparts if they do not do everything to prevent this - both men and women. Viva Egypt. & Change.

Posted by: ahb16 | February 16, 2011 12:59 AM | Report abuse

Enough with the cultural stereotyping. I think 99% of Egyptians (who comprise more than just one religion) find what happened to be unacceptable as well.

Posted by: daharbin | February 16, 2011 1:25 AM | Report abuse

Not to minimize the barbaric attack on Lara Logan, but women do not need to visit a Third World country or go to an American backwater to be subjected to catcalls and verbal assault while walking down a busy street.

My daughter attends a college adjacent to Baltimore, MD and lived 4 blocks off campus in 2010.

She and other women walking to and from classes were subjected to a daily gauntlet of catcalls, propositions, and a barrage of verbal harassment while going about their business. This semester, my daughter decided to move into a dorm on campus rather than endure this on a routine basis.
Sexual harassment of women is a problem that exists worldwide today, even in an "advanced" Western society.

Posted by: allblues2003 | February 16, 2011 1:34 AM | Report abuse

1) When would it ever possibly be "fortunate," that rape cases involving "known, blonde, white women" are the ones that linger in the public mind? For who has this ever been fortunate?

2) Where in the U.S do you live that you are unaware of pervasive street harassment and gang rape? Every woman I know, of every race, hair color, physical appearance and manner of dress, has experienced regular street harassment if she's ever lived in a major U.S city. Group rape happens all the time in the U.S. There was a brutal gang rape of a teenage girl at her own homecoming dance last year, that got a lot of press. Maybe you heard about it? I assume now that you're aware, your column on how unsafe the U.S is for girls and women is forthcoming?

I don't mean to downplay the severity of the attack on Lara Logan, or the possibility that is one reported attack out of many unreported attacks, or the noted pervasiveness of harassment in Cairo and Alexandria. But to single out one country or culture in what is clearly a worldwide problem, and to invent some bizzaro world version of the U.S in order to make your point is just absurd.

Posted by: Eva7 | February 16, 2011 3:01 AM | Report abuse

Someone asked: "Why is it significant that she is a blonde white woman?"

What? Are White people supposed to be so insignificant now?

Posted by: JulianLee | February 16, 2011 3:14 AM | Report abuse

"Would the story be less pernicious or have less staying power if she were not blonde and white?"
-----
You know the answer is yes.
----
"A stupid comment."
----
But honest and real.

Posted by: JulianLee | February 16, 2011 3:18 AM | Report abuse

This kind of behaviour is endemic throughout the middle east. In Morocco, in a town called Tourudant, my wife insisted on going to the local market, when after hours of wandering around in the hot sun, i wanted to collapse into the pool. Being the headstrong person that she is, she insisted on going by herself. I told her that without me, she would get harassed and wouldn't be able to handle it . . well, off she went, and to my suprise was back at the hotel before me. I had taken the long way back, but she had lasted all of about 5 minutes by herself. Even in Istanbul, in relatvely modern, democratic, liberal Turkey, women can expect harassment. If you want to enjoy your night out, take a man with you. Any man! Otherwise expect constant learing chatups from men you regard you as some kind of 'free' prostitute. Sad but true. That said tho, in Vietnam, within 2 minutes of my wife leaving me in a sidewalk cafe and going to bed in the hotel across the road, i was offered 'cheap girls, very young', and i got the distinct impression that 'very young' was about 10 years old. This from guys that, in front of my wife, had been very nice, friendly etc etc. Sad to say alot of the world can be a very ugly place. We often make the mistake of thinking everyone thinks like we do, and if left to their own devices, will act like us . . . ( ie. western liberal progressive etc ) Not so . . .

Posted by: atheaker | February 16, 2011 4:49 AM | Report abuse

This kind of behaviour is endemic throughout the middle east. In Morocco, in a town called Tourudant, my wife insisted on going to the local market, when after hours of wandering around in the hot sun, i wanted to collapse into the pool. Being the headstrong person that she is, she insisted on going by herself. I told her that without me, she would get harassed and wouldn't be able to handle it . . well, off she went, and to my suprise was back at the hotel before me. I had taken the long way back, but she had lasted all of about 5 minutes by herself. Even in Istanbul, in relatvely modern, democratic, liberal Turkey, women can expect harassment. If you want to enjoy your night out, take a man with you. Any man! Otherwise expect constant learing chatups from men you regard you as some kind of 'free' prostitute. Sad but true. That said tho, in Vietnam, within 2 minutes of my wife leaving me in a sidewalk cafe and going to bed in the hotel across the road, i was offered 'cheap girls, very young', and i got the distinct impression that 'very young' was about 10 years old. This from guys that, in front of my wife, had been very nice, friendly etc etc. Sad to say alot of the world can be a very ugly place. We often make the mistake of thinking everyone thinks like we do, and if left to their own devices, will act like us . . . ( ie. western liberal progressive etc ) Not so . . .

Posted by: atheaker | February 16, 2011 4:49 AM | Report abuse

I wonder what you would make of this story below about a girl gang raped outside of a prom. I fear you might call it "enlightened" rape since it happened in the west. Many people just stood by and watched and some even took pictures and video.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/10/27/police-people-watched-gan_n_334975.html

Posted by: ex-oriente-lux | February 16, 2011 5:02 AM | Report abuse

Well, I guess this explains why Muslim women have to wear giant potato sacks and be accompanied by a male relative in certain countries.

Posted by: thebink | February 16, 2011 7:13 AM | Report abuse

Sorry that it happened. But I have to ask, why the hell was she dressed like she was, where she was? White jacket and pearl necklace, relatively (for tahrir square) low cut shirt, nothing on her blond head.. Did she have a hot date right after the segment and didn't have time to get re-dressed for it? That's what I call living dangerously. I'd never do it, it seems like a world-wise reporter like Logan would know better. But I guess she felt that her crew would protect her. Still, an unwise choice of garb I say.

Posted by: fraccle | February 16, 2011 7:16 AM | Report abuse

I say we send her back so she can be stoned for crimes! Those poor men must have suffered and they are no longer pure due to this westernized woman's lustful ways! Ali Akbar mugga dugga

Posted by: Ex-democrat1 | February 16, 2011 7:43 AM | Report abuse

Folks, if you really hate Islam, then your number one agenda should be green energy. You should support high gasoline taxes to wean us of dependence on oil. The main reason why the US absolutely must maintain some kind of diplomatic peace with Islamic nations is that we need their oil. Your computer-game fantasies of defeating them all militarily and taking over those oil fields are both barbaric and stupid. There are only two choices: get off oil, or curry favor with international Islam somehow. Our past choice of helping to prop up brutal dictatorships isn't working any more, and it's made them rather angry with us - imagine that. So before you pop off about political correctness and all, be sure to have an alternate, workable plan.

Meanwhile, here in the US, if the 1st amendment means anything, Muslims are entitled to practice their religion as they wish. That's what it means to be a free country.

Posted by: NomoStew | February 16, 2011 7:45 AM | Report abuse

Horrific incidences of violence against women happen all the time in all societies. Recently in my neighborhood a group of young men/boys repeatedly raped a 15 year old girl and recorded it on cell phones.

It seems to be a guy thing everywhere.

Posted by: rhatso | February 16, 2011 8:02 AM | Report abuse

Has anybody else wondered why the group of people she was with left her to fend for herself?

Posted by: jlbpa | February 16, 2011 8:06 AM | Report abuse

How smart is it to send a blonde (dyed, but still...) into a middle eastern country? All of the networks are equally at fault in this area, and share the blame. Don't blame the people in Egypt; blame the reporter's employers. Only male reporters should be deployed outside the US.

And, as others have mentioned, "sexually assaulted" does NOT mean rape.

Posted by: Lefty7 | February 16, 2011 8:43 AM | Report abuse

Lara Logan made a choice to do her job, she knew the risks, and CBS is going to give her more than flowers as she was attacked while on the job. The reason she was raped is because she is a woman. Period. And reading between CBS's lines, Logan was gang raped over a period of time. She could as easily have been raped (btw, sexual assault means rape!) on the streets of New York City or in rural Vermont. Sexual assaults occur every day, all over the world.

It's time for people educate themselves about this subject. Some of the comments here are downright ignorant, insensitive, and crude. Remember: it's never a woman's or child's fault when she is sexually assaulted, anywhere or anytime. Also remember that each of us have women and children in our lives who are vulnerable to this heinous crime because rape is about power, not sex.

Posted by: RuralVermont | February 16, 2011 8:54 AM | Report abuse

Perhaps this is a place where "diversity" should have yielded to common sense. Obviously we would like both male and female reporters to have the same opportunities, but this was an unsafe place at a volatile time, and there was every risk of this happening.

Posted by: Nemo24601 | February 16, 2011 9:08 AM | Report abuse

The more I read about the world and what our Govt. is doing to support these countries the sicker I becomOBAMA YOU ARE A HEARTLESS BEAST!! NO NEED TO GO INTO DETAILS, BUT TAKING AWAY HEAT AND FOOD FROM THE POOR AND NEEDY IS NORE THANHORRIBLE.

WHERE IS ALL THE MONEY GOING FROM THESE BIG CORPS. AND HAS ANY OF THESE OIL COMPANIES PAID BILLIONS THEY OWE IN PAST FINES?

hILLARY HAS OUTLIVED HER EFFECTIVENESS. SHE LOOKS LIKE A POOR SLOB. MICHELLE IS STILL LAUGHING I GUESS, AT WHO, THE PEOPLE OF THIS COUNTRY!!! BOTH THE PRESIDENT AND HIS WIFE ARE MAKING DAMM FOOLS OF US ALL AND TAKING OUR LIFE'S BLOOD AWAY FROM US

Posted by: LOONYBIN2000 | February 16, 2011 9:12 AM | Report abuse

Don't kid yourself that it can't and doesn't happen here. I've been to numerous HFS Festivals and other concerts and have seen girls being groped and basically sexually assaulted. There was a mass assault in Central Park a few years back where dozens of women were stripped and assaulted. This is not a problem specifically central to Arab countries.

Posted by: CHICO13 | February 16, 2011 9:13 AM | Report abuse

Of course any assault is unacceptable. Equally unacceptable is the grandstanding involved in urging on a riot when the rioters do not understand your language, and you do not understand theirs. Reporters are not god's chosen ones, and they should not be surprised when they don't get deference!! Ask Anderson Cooper...

Posted by: falcon269 | February 16, 2011 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Lara Logan is one of the top journalists in the world. Articulate, insightful, brave, compassionate and courageous. She's covered some of the most volcanic stories in hot spots throughout the world - Rwanda, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, and more -- on the highest level, and she's provided an objective and humane perspective, despite the chaos and madness. I saw her interview with Charlie Rose a few days prior to her assault, and she was quite reluctant to return to Cairo after being subjected to mental abuse and deprivation by the brutal security organization. The fact that Lara returned back to Cairo, after this, shows how dedicated she is to her craft, her profession, and to the cataclysmic events that shake our world. What occurred last week was tragic and horrific. But Lara's a warrior, and she will recover, wounds and all. Right now may Lara heal with the warmth of family and friends. I imagine Lara will be covering another heated event or story in the near future. After all, Lara Logan, is one of, if not the best, foreign correspondent in the world. God speed for healing and thank you for your courage and outstanding work!

Posted by: StevenSikes | February 16, 2011 9:25 AM | Report abuse

I have lived in Kuwait, a very Muslim country, for three years. I am a single white woman from America and I always feel safe here. I travel all over the country, often alone, and have never felt threatened in any way. Also, I have more religious freedom here, as a nontheist, than I have in some parts of the US. Please do NOT label all Muslims on the basis of what happened to Ms. Logan. What was done to her was done by bad people - period. Their religion was irrelevant. The many Muslims I know are as offended as the rest of us. I wish her a speedy recovery.

Posted by: FredaClark | February 16, 2011 9:26 AM | Report abuse

Hey Petri - How long did it take you to come up with this headline? Or, was the other geniuses at WAPO?

"Unacceptable"???????? Being late to an appointment is unacceptable. A bad meal is unacceptable. Lousy service is unacceptable. Allowing incompetent writers on a national stage is unacceptable. Come on Petri, scratch those two little brains cells rolling around in that apparently vacuous skull and see if you can come up with something a bit more "acceptable".

Posted by: Bcamp55 | February 16, 2011 9:46 AM | Report abuse

Of course any assault is unacceptable. Equally unacceptable is the grandstanding involved in urging on a riot when the rioters do not understand your language, and you do not understand theirs. Reporters are not god's chosen ones, and they should not be surprised when they don't get deference!! Ask Anderson Cooper...

Posted by: falcon269 | February 16, 2011 9:56 AM | Report abuse

"I don't believe this could have happened here"...

don't underestimate the power of a mob. there are central park joggers who would dispute your claim.

Posted by: missmoirashea | February 16, 2011 10:11 AM | Report abuse

This is stupid. What happened here is typical. Young reporters trying desperately to get the next 'big story' is probably the main problem here. Egypt is a mess, know the risks when you go in. No one cares that she's a blonde, white woman. How racist can you be? I appreciate journalists who try to bring me current news, but I don't feel we need to have hundreds of them covering the same event. That's what seems to dictate news these days: not the actual news, but how many clowns show up to cover it. To Ms. Logan, I'm sorry you got hurt. Take the good, take the bad, take them both, and there you have; the world today.

Posted by: chefhusker | February 16, 2011 10:55 AM | Report abuse

Evil men and women exist in ALL facets of life...ALL. My hand of peace and love to the people who stood up for Ms. Logan in that situation. My condemnation to the men and any who have and shall commit such an act on another human being. My Heart to Ms. Logan for a speedy recovery. My logic and empathy to the people on this commentary thread for peace and understanding, not to belittle their hatred, not educate their ignorance, just simply peace and understanding...

Posted by: dexamir | February 16, 2011 10:56 AM | Report abuse

This is horrible, I read the article, but I found it interesting that they stated that they were thankful for living in the US because it safe from cat calling, and being molested walking through a crowd of men. Or they do not believe this could happen here! Sorry you have a clound of optimism hanging over your eyes that you might want to look through. Yes we have a great country but lets not be blind to what is going on daily in our own back yard! Hmmm, maybe they should come to the western states, while the pipeliners are here working. My girlfriends and I were out one evening and we were cat called, molested, and some girls were even slipped rouffies< (none of my friends thank gooodness) but still horrible. It is everywhere and it is disgusting. I finaly told some guy, and I quote,

"I have told you NO three times and that I am married! Is this what you and your buddies do? Travel from town to town treating women like they are at a meat market, saying disgusting things and grabbing and groping at them! Its disgusting and you should be ashamed of yourself. Do you tnink we enjoy this, really? Now get the HELL AWAY FROM ME!"

I think he was finaly embarrased and left me alone, but my girlfriends and I left because it was so bad.

It happens everywhere, and is deffinately not isolated to the middle east!

Posted by: jsassyjc | February 16, 2011 11:02 AM | Report abuse

Instead of being a humor column, are you now also planning to expand and to help us stop the sex slave trade that is taking place right here in the good ole USA. After all, we're spending trillions on wars in Iraq and Afghanistan while laying off police in the US and cutting back on mental health benefits for desperate Americans.

I'm just sayin...LL suffered brutal treatment in Egypt and we also need to admit there's a lot of brutality right here in the US...and it's going to get even worse if we continue to follow the Tea Baggers and the Republicans. It's time to increase domestic programs and time to cut our military expansionism around the world.

Posted by: go2goal | February 16, 2011 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Her security had the primary job of protecting her. Where'd they go? Was it too hard to stay next to her? That was their job.

Posted by: TheLeopard | February 16, 2011 11:27 AM | Report abuse

Your story brings to light the plight of many women around the globe. What occurred is certainly not okay in any society. On the other hand, when a reporter, man or woman, places themselves in a situation where mass mob rules the laws of civility just don't exist. Time and again reports indicate how mass mob mentality take on a life of its own. Arguments have been made about why a person is innocent because they got caught up in the frenzy of mob mentality. So, why would it surprise anyone that a foreigner in the middle of a mobbed frenzy would wind up assaulted and injured by the crowd. It is not just the rule of Mubarak that the crowd was upset at for their feelings of dispare. It was foreign intervention in their government and that government not taking care of the people. Since the US is the primary partner of the Egyptian government, naturally US citizens would be a target of opportunity. SO, the news media feels the need to report on what is happening and rightly so. The world has a right to know about Egyptian concerns. Does that mean that you need to place someone in a vulnerable position at the heart of the violence? No. Don't ask us as Americans to get all huffy because one of our news media personalities was assaulted on assignment in a volitale place. As yourselves a question, "How can I cover the story without endangering my reporters?" If you cannot do that, then assess the risk verses the benefits of getting the story out. Beyond that, find something else to report on. Blood letting is not called for in this case, because the reporter went into a situation where she and her parent organization knew the potential for injury existed. Don't get me wrong. I am not advocating what happened as okay. I am saying don't expect me to get riled up over something that was preventable by not putting a person in a known hostile environment.

Posted by: oldsalt78 | February 16, 2011 11:40 AM | Report abuse

Unfortunately, the comment about "white, blonde woman" is true. Stories about certain people in our society get more attention.

Posted by: rlj1 | February 16, 2011 12:05 PM | Report abuse

Karma for the home wrecker Logan?

Posted by: j751 | February 16, 2011 12:29 PM | Report abuse

...rescued by a group of women AND soldiers, from the reports I saw on NBC this morning. Why leave the reference to them out?

I pray Laura Logan recovers completely from this terrible attack.

Posted by: terencef100 | February 16, 2011 12:33 PM | Report abuse

I am short of sympathy for people who do stupid, stupid things and then suffer adverse consequences.

Posted by: JosephDoakes | February 16, 2011 12:34 PM | Report abuse

exactly why do we finance cultures like this?
It's not like we tie it to improvements in rights and actions.

The US simply needs to stop financing backwards misogynistic cultures.

Posted by: newagent99 | February 16, 2011 12:35 PM | Report abuse

This is a horrible, despicable incident. But this is the SAME INCIDENT that happened to Jamie Leigh Jones while in the employ of Halliburton KBR in Iraq, and Republicans in the Senate chose to look the other way.

Ms. Jones was gang raped by her co-workers (who were mostly white, and American, and worked for Halliburton - there's the difference, isn't it?) on company grounds in Iraq. The company then shut her up in a trailer to keep her from reporting the incident. The response of Republicans in the Senate? Boys will be boys, and Halliburton should bear no responsibility for what was done to her both during and after the rape. Women are fair game if they work for Republican-friendly contractors overseas.

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/story?id=3977702&page=1

http://www.alternet.org/blogs/healthwellness/143164/30_gop_senators_vote_to_defend_gang_rape/

Posted by: B2O2 | February 16, 2011 12:36 PM | Report abuse

I don't need a weatherperson standing in the middle of a hurricane to tell me about the weather.
I don't need a newsperson in the middle of a mob to tell me about the middle east.
What a unnecessary tragic WASTE.
Wise up media!

Posted by: smithbob1 | February 16, 2011 12:51 PM | Report abuse

I am disturbed that the authors of this blog don't think this could have happened in the USA. I suggest they go to http://violenceunsilenced.com/blog/ and read the stories of what has happened to these women who chose to share their stories, who lived to tell. Think about all those who couldn't or wouldn't. Change begins at home.

Posted by: baltimoregalblog | February 16, 2011 12:59 PM | Report abuse

"The question is what we should do about it? I would like to drop a bomb on Mecca to punish those savages."

Posted by: danredmondfootball


Try hooking up with someone in the United States who likes to blow abortion clinics up. Maybe they can help you out.

Posted by: hootathought1 | February 16, 2011 1:05 PM | Report abuse

This was a strangely titled piece. I only read it to find out who in the world would think it was 'funny'. Answer - Nobody. So, I guess the title was just to get people to read it ? Kinda lame.

Posted by: dinopello | February 16, 2011 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Lara Logan along with Darwa from CNN are two of the best female reporters of our time, and there are many more who put their lives on the line performing their journalistic duties.

Watching the news reports I was concerned about the crowds for all the journalists but expecially for the women.

The rape and beating of Lara concerns me and angers me because it seems that women in the world "have not come a long way baby" when it comes to being treated with the respect deserving of the female gender.
All to often women are second class citizens especially in the MidEast and third world nations. Look at Africa, raping women seems to be a hobby it is so commonplace especially in war-torn areas.

Frankly, it was not wise for any journalist to put themselves in the middle of crowds such as the ones in Egypt. It is simply too dangerous. A crowd such as those has the ability to "turn on a dime," from being peaceful to being enraged. It is just human nature when that many people are gathered together in mass protests an in such an emotional state. There are bound to be those who use it as an opportunity to be violent. Unfortuantely Lara became a victim to such individuals.

Many thanks to the women who came to her rescue.

Posted by: rannrann | February 16, 2011 1:09 PM | Report abuse

This just in: reporting can be really really dangerous, and rape is bad. Expert commentary, this.

Posted by: charlesbakerharris | February 16, 2011 1:15 PM | Report abuse

Shiria law allows abuse of women. Women are regarded as chattel. The father who ran over his daughter because she was becoming too Westernized. The woman who was raped by several men and charged with adultery. Men can have up to 4 wives. This is a law that exists in Egypt. And they want a democracy????

Posted by: abtmrt | February 16, 2011 1:21 PM | Report abuse

The question is what we should do about it? I would like to drop a bomb on Mecca to punish those savages.

Posted by: danredmondfootball | February 15, 2011 7:47 PM |

Right. Because Saudi Arabia is the same as Egypt, so you'd be punishing Cairenes by killing Meccans. So which US city should be obliterated to pay back Steven Green and his buddies?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahmudiyah_killings

Posted by: BobT51 | February 16, 2011 1:28 PM | Report abuse

The Wall Street Journal is reporting it was "not a rape" and that Lara Logan is "eager to return back to work"

Posted by: dusty_chin | February 16, 2011 1:29 PM | Report abuse

This incident is a real horror. This kind of behavior happens in many countries especially in Brazil and perhaps some African countries. Ths behavior is nothing to do with Islam or any other religion and it is more to do with men of that culture. What is shocking is the involvement of so many men. Real horror. I hope somehow this revolution brings a drastic change in the behavior of these men. It sure is going to take a long time.

Posted by: commonman13 | February 16, 2011 1:31 PM | Report abuse


Petri must do her zionist part to throw sludge on Egypt's new situation, like the rest of hte WaPo crew.

Petri and the Post haven't mentioned the several ISraeli officials, a Mayor, a President, who've been prosecutred for rape or other such. But of course.

"This isn't funny"...the headline reads.
MY GOD, did Petri or the Post think it
MIGHT BE FUNNY? Because it was in an Arab
country, or what?


A

Posted by: whistling | February 16, 2011 1:35 PM | Report abuse

Thank you for this article, the perspective and the statistics.

Posted by: llrllr | February 16, 2011 1:49 PM | Report abuse

I am very very sorry about Ms. Logan and I hope she recovers. Thank you to the women who saved her.

That said, how is it possible that a woman in the year 2011 can state that catcalls, etc. don't happen here! Are you kidding me??? Walk by any construction site anywhere in the USA and believe me what you will be subjected to is catcalls and whistles. And just in case you're still asleep don't go out at night, alone, in any city across the country.

If you doubt this call any rape crisis center in any city. Take a walk to the police stations and to the local hospital emergency rooms.

To even suggest that this could not and does not happen here is unbelievable.

Posted by: vjfevp | February 16, 2011 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Anderson Cooper is jealous. He'd pay to get gang raped by a gang of muslims..

Posted by: wewintheylose1 | February 16, 2011 1:52 PM | Report abuse

Your right Ms. little Petri, it's not funny and it's not acceptable.

What it is, is both tragedy and a crime when people abuse other's for their own self pleasure.

Anyone who thinks such sexual abuse or exploitation towards women is funny and only happens in Egypt, they themselves are just as sadistic and would most likely do the same thing freely and openly, if given the chance in America.

In America's free democratic society, sexual abuse and exploitation of young girls and women is hidden and very much prevalent. Many of these young girl's and women in America are kidnapped, bought and sold on the streets of America like chattel and transported across state lines just so the sadistic men in our free democratic society can exploit these young girl's and women for their own sexual pleasures.

What happened to Ms. Logan is both sad and unacceptable in Egypt. But, what does this say about the men who exploit and abuse young women and girl's in our own country.

There is nothing new about this type of abuse under the sun, not even in Egypt.

Posted by: lcarter0311 | February 16, 2011 1:53 PM | Report abuse

You might want to drop a note to that consummate Hollywood liberal, Bill Maher, to not make any more sick jokes about this horrible assault.

Or better yet, get an interview with his former pornstar girl friend, Coco Johnsen, where she could recall how Maher apparently rearranged her face on numerous occasions.

He is one nasty piece of work.

Posted by: r_loveland | February 16, 2011 2:01 PM | Report abuse

She's not a "reporter." She's more of a quality control inspector. Her husband is a "defense contractor" and she gets to go to places to make sure the weapons are working properly. Keep it in the family as they say!

Posted by: sufi66 | February 16, 2011 2:02 PM | Report abuse

What has happened to Laura Logan is horrible, but if you think this is isolated to the Middle East you are the ones wearing veils. It happens hear in the US, more than we realize! I have witnessed it and been a part of it. It is not just muslim countries, so we need to stop stereotyping. Not everthing is rainbows and roses here in the US, the newspapers and journalist just don't publish it as much.

Posted by: jsassyjc | February 16, 2011 2:02 PM | Report abuse

Who wants to bet that the "participants" in this act were the same Mubarak thugs of the Egyptian secret police responsible for other instances of beatings, harassments and arrests of foreign and domestic newspeople?

Those who claim that this behavior is endemic to Arab or Muslim societies must not have gotten the memo - this kind of stuff can and does happen in almost all societies.

Posted by: wozzle | February 16, 2011 2:04 PM | Report abuse

As has been mentioned, this is commonplace in the Muslim world for any woman not escorted in public by a family member, particularly with her head uncovered.

And the Leftists want to suggest that conservative Christian are no different? PLEASE!

Posted by: JustJoe3 | February 16, 2011 2:08 PM | Report abuse

The danger was widely known, and I'm sure if Ms. Logan has any concept of Egypt, she was aware of the risk.

Petri erred when she omitted the fact that Egyptian 20 soldiers along with some Egyptian women rescued Logan. Was that not also a bright spot? Guess it depends if you're the one on the ground with a circle of men around you.

I always liked the green eyeshadow Logan wore to color coordinate with the camo uniforms of the units where she was embedded.

Kimberly Dozier and Bob Woodruff were badly injured while embedded. And Danny Pearl was killed chasing a Pulitzer into the (Arab) street.

Better safe than sorry.

Posted by: blasmaic | February 16, 2011 2:16 PM | Report abuse

Loveland, we're talking about a proven assault on a reporter here, not a he said/she said court battle. You're only relating Coco Johnson's side of the story. Here's an article on Bill Maher's side:

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/crime/maher-ex-serial-shakedown-artist

Or could it be that you are sore with Bill Maher for making fun of Elizabeth Hasselbeck (Who deserves all the ridicule she gets)?

Posted by: sasquatchbigfoot | February 16, 2011 2:19 PM | Report abuse

"Shiria law allows abuse of women. Women are regarded as chattel."

As do "Republican corporate-family Values". Just ask Jamie Leigh Jones. These 30 Republican senators voted to allow employees of overseas contractors to gang rape as much as they please without fear of prosecution. Boys will be boys, I guess.

Alexander (R-TN)
Barrasso (R-WY)
Bond (R-MO)
Brownback (R-KS)
Bunning (R-KY)
Burr (R-NC)
Chambliss (R-GA)
Coburn (R-OK)
Cochran (R-MS)
Corker (R-TN)
Cornyn (R-TX)
Crapo (R-ID)
DeMint (R-SC)
Ensign (R-NV)
Enzi (R-WY)
Graham (R-SC)
Gregg (R-NH)
Inhofe (R-OK)
Isakson (R-GA)
Johanns (R-NE)
Kyl (R-AZ)
McCain (R-AZ)
McConnell (R-KY)
Risch (R-ID)
Roberts (R-KS)
Sessions (R-AL)
Shelby (R-AL)
Thune (R-SD)
Vitter (R-LA)
Wicker (R-MS)

http://www.alternet.org/blogs/healthwellness/143164/30_gop_senators_vote_to_defend_gang_rape/

Posted by: B2O2 | February 16, 2011 2:22 PM | Report abuse

It couldn't happen here? Alexandra, where have you been? What are you talking about? In 2009 a 15-year old was gang raped while at least 20 participated or watched. Read The Root article on Recy Taylor. Remember the film The Accused? Wow, if you're going to continue to write for a major newspaper, please get your head out of la-la land, because it's these kinds of stories - where victims are often ashamed to come forward - that require serious attention by journalists.

Posted by: dailyfare | February 16, 2011 2:25 PM | Report abuse

THAT'S WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU SEND A WOMAN TO DO A MAN'S JOB. sHE SHOULD KEEP IT TO HERSELF AND GO ON WITH HER LIFE.

Posted by: confedrate1111 | February 16, 2011 2:32 PM | Report abuse

As for groping, from what I've heard you may want to stay away from India, especially train platforms.

Posted by: caribis | February 16, 2011 2:35 PM | Report abuse

" Living in the United States, I take for granted my ability to walk unmolested in the street. I don't believe this could have happened here. And the idea that such a horror could take place in the midst not of pervasive violence but of celebration is especially shocking."

You miss the point, and many of the idiots commenting here about Islam and Arabs are also missing the point. What is it? Two things: 1) A repressed society that isn't free to express itself and is stiffled by democracy will vent itself on those weaker: minorities, women, etc. This is a UNIVERSAL FACT. 2) In conflict zones or times of LAWLESSNESS or the perception of such, including extreme jubiliation at the ouster of your country's head of state, there is a UNIVERSAL tendency by men to engage in sexual assualt and rape against women.

For those who think we are so much better, try reading these before you go any further:

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2328426/richmond_high_school_california_an.html

http://www.ibiblio.org/rcip//cek.html

Posted by: muzzle | February 16, 2011 2:36 PM | Report abuse

Reading the comments it's as if most readers have no idea what has been going on in Egypt for the past month.

Here (http://abcworldnews.tumblr.com/post/3089328425/weve-compiled-a-list-of-all-the-journalists-who) is a list from ABC News of some 40 journalists who were "threatened, attacked or detained while reporting in Egypt". Most were victims of Mubarak's police and armed supporters, those trying to stop the revolution and protect the US backed and financed dictator's regime.

This is not about Arab or muslim culture or sharia friggin' law. Were not the women and soldiers who saved her life Egyptian, some certainly muslim?

Posted by: nanak1 | February 16, 2011 2:37 PM | Report abuse


TOUGH COOKIES, HONEY.

YOU WANTED EQUAL RIGHTS, SO, YOU SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES AND SHUT UP...

...OR GET BACK IN THE KITCHEN WHERE YOU BELONG (AFTER YOU LEARN HOW TO BAKE).

Posted by: jiji1 | February 16, 2011 2:46 PM | Report abuse

Oooooh, alternet. We should always believe what alternet says... lol.

Posted by: martel732 | February 16, 2011 2:49 PM | Report abuse

As for unacceptable. That's like saying it's unacceptable for a person to be eaten by a lion while hiking in the jungles of Africa. Telling someone it's "unacceptable" implies that you are dealing with someone who knows ultimately or on some level can understand it is unacceptable. You don't have that situation in this case.

Posted by: martel732 | February 16, 2011 2:52 PM | Report abuse

I am so surprised that others do not appreciate our social experiment of placing a woman in a man's role!

When will liberals ever learn that the rest of the world laughs at our attempts at gender equality, at the expense of a woman's life!

When you are in a jungle, think like a predator, not prey!

Posted by: numbersch13 | February 16, 2011 3:31 PM | Report abuse

Grow up. I'm mixed Asian/white male and have strong opinion of white/joo who punish me for the race mixing of the seed. You think you got problems? Give me a break, FBI crime victimization stats don't show blonde white women as prime crime targets. You'd never know that if you listen to white/Joo media where it's all white women in peril, white children at risk. Some guy said nuke Mecca, well nuke you buddy.

Posted by: Uoughtano | February 16, 2011 3:35 PM | Report abuse

Godspeed to Ms.Logan. But your title is a bit superfluous. Could it ever have BEEN acceptable? Of course it is not right, not legal, not decent, not acceptable, so I'm afraid I missed the point you were aiming at with the title. When do you propose that beating and sexually assaulting a reporter, or anyone else, be acceptable???

Posted by: lastrebelstanding | February 16, 2011 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Well there are a few things you need to remember before trying the old and tired "...women are powerless..." argument. First Anderson Cooper was also attacked a few weeks back as well as some reporters. The main reason behind them all is the fact that most Americans think it`s perfectly natural to put your country and it`s leaders down, something frowned upon in the rest of the world.
Add to this the fact that it`s an Arab nation in the midst of a revolution with Western reporters being very critical of the country`s history. Ms Logan is also American. While Arabs hate people critcal of Islam they hate Americans critical of their way of life and religion even more. So get to thinking that it`s not a gender thing here although her sex and size might have played a part.

Posted by: weat_coast | February 16, 2011 4:02 PM | Report abuse

What happened to Ms. Logan does not appear to be linked to her status as a reporter. It could have happened to any woman. However, I do note an increasing trend by reporters to claim that they should be immune from threat while reporting. Certainly, this is an understandable stance for them to take (!). I don't think there ever was a time when reporters were neutral in wartime (going back to Billy Russell and the Crimea 160 years ago). However, now that you have reporters openly favoring rebels in Egypt and Iran, and perhaps influencing a few of those unable to make their own minds up, is it surprising that they are targeted? If reporters maintained strict neutrality, in word and implication, between foe and foe, then I'd say sure, treat them like the Red Cross. We've had reporters start a war in the Balkans and egg on sympathetic rebels. If they want to be players, they have to take both sides of that, and that means being a potential target.

Posted by: Nemo24601 | February 16, 2011 4:27 PM | Report abuse

What happened to Ms. Logan is tragic; but men can face the same end when there is mob rule; at that instant in the square, mob mentality prevailed. CBS should have taken better care of their reporters; they have inexperienced kids out there, they rid themselves of veterans like Dan Rather, where is Moonvis now? Hiding behind his desk and contemplating how to get Charlie Sheen back from rehab?

Posted by: esb49 | February 16, 2011 4:55 PM | Report abuse

wow islam intolerant .. who would of thought

Posted by: justQQ | February 16, 2011 5:01 PM | Report abuse

What CBS and ALL the other mainstay media outlets have failed to report is that the men were chanting "Jew, Jew, Jew" as she was molested. How come this is not being reported anywhere??

Posted by: Magnus0u812 | February 16, 2011 5:01 PM | Report abuse

wow islam intolerant .. who would of thought

http://mypetjawa.mu.nu/archives/206314.php

Posted by: justQQ | February 16, 2011 5:05 PM | Report abuse

ummm it happens(the groping of unsuspecting woman) in Japan on a daily basis with impunity...www.japanfortheuninvited.com/articles/train-groping.html

Posted by: kathrynne | February 16, 2011 5:10 PM | Report abuse

Do you know why, Ms Petri, the assault of a "blonde, white woman" has a "pernicious staying power"?

Because people like you perpetuate it.

The story would have still be powerful if you had simply written about the facts- without the racial/class twists.

Posted by: lopes1578 | February 17, 2011 12:18 PM | Report abuse

Petri writes, "Living in the United States, I take for granted my ability to walk unmolested in the street. I don't believe this could have happened here."

Really?? A 2007 study of sexual harassment in New York City reported 63% of women subway riders reported being sexually harassed and 10% sexually assaulted. In another Chicago study, 36% of the women reported they are sexually harassed DAILY!

see http://www.stopstreetharassment.com/streetharassment/statistics.htm

Quit trying to make this an "us vs. them" , "our culture vs. their culture" narrative.

Posted by: Abubrad | February 17, 2011 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Lest we forget, in the United States of America there are 683,000 forcible rapes a year, equalling 1.3 per minute. Of course, being American, they bare no relevance to this article.

Posted by: hypocampus | February 17, 2011 5:15 PM | Report abuse

First, just because of its importance, I'm going to repeat Hypocampus' comments:

"Lest we forget, in the United States of America there are 683,000 forcible rapes a year, equaling 1.3 per minute." These rapes cannot be blamed on "Islamic Culture".

Second, I am concerned with the way people are treating Ms. Logan. They keep making comments along the lines of 'That was so silly of her to go to Egypt', 'Didn't she know the state department warnings', 'Why didn't CBS protect her' blah blah blah. Ms. Logan is a grown woman. As a reporter she knows the risks of her work better than any of you, and just like several other brave journalists around the world, she is making the choice to face these risks to carry out her work and provide information to Americans and people around the world.

Thirdly, I hope people making comments such along the lines of 'this is what happens when you put a woman in a man's job.. this is what results from stupid liberals ideas of gender equality' realize a few things. Male journalists face similar, and sometimes worse, risks, so being male doesn't help that much. Again, she knows the risks and chooses to follow her passion anyways. This is EXACTLY what we want with gender equality. The world isn't a safe place for anyone, so instead of trying to stifle people's potentials and 'protect' them, get over it. This woman wasn't afraid so why should you be?

Lastly, and perhaps most illuminating, is that you place the problem on the woman trying to be a journalist, not on the fact that men attack women. This reveals you have already accepted sexual assault as something that just happens. Is that because you, yourself would do such a thing? If not, why would you expect others to carry out such behavior, what makes you so special? And why, instead of holding other people to your standards, do you condone their behavior instead?

Posted by: 1g23 | February 17, 2011 7:36 PM | Report abuse

"I don't believe this could have happened here."

Are you trying to say that women don't get raped in large crowds in America? Have you ever heard of Woodstock '99? Whether this part of your analysis is ethnocentric or just American exceptionalism, it's not very helpful to the discussion.

Posted by: yamfood | February 18, 2011 12:28 PM | Report abuse

I seem to have seen a lot of women out in the streets of Egypt and other ME countries, no doubt at some risk to themselves. I have a feeling one of the points they're making is that attitudes towards women aren't what they should be there.

Nice, that so many people, like some commenters here, are showing their support for those women by taking advantage of this trajic event to slam their entire culture, their religion and all the men who live in their countries, because of what these particular people did.

Posted by: Diane1976 | February 18, 2011 4:46 PM | Report abuse

Lady Gaga is photographing her new cover art. As she is climbing over railing into the lion exhibit with her camera crew, she is stopped by zoo security. They tell her that she has to stay out of the exhibit for her safety because lion behavior cannot be predicted; they don’t follow the same rules of society that many humans do. He explains further that it would be particularly dangerous in this case because lions are agitated by the flash of a camera, and attracted to the infamous meat dress she is wearing. He adds that while zoo employees sometimes do go into the exhibit, they take precautions to ensure that the lions are not in an agitated state, they keep the scent of food off of them and they have tranquilizer darts to diffuse an imminent attack.

Additionally, female handlers are not assigned to this particular exhibit because one lion shows a long history of increased aggression to woman handlers and many have suffered considerable injury. She is outraged, tells him that he has no right to compromise the vision of a powerful woman and that her job necessitates that she “shock and awe” her fans to keep them engaged. Zoo security tells her that she can wear her meat dress and take images with the lions, but she must do it from a safe vantage point in front of the exhibit. She refuses. Security escorts them out of the zoo and tells them not to come back.

The next day, Lady Gaga sneaks back into the exhibit with her crew and starts photographing. The camera agitates the lions, and they maul Lady Gaga in her meat dress. Zoo security arrives, tranquilizes the lions and saves Lady Gaga’s life. News of the attack is highly publicized. The public demands that the lions are killed, that her record label is reprimanded for allowing her to go there. It is also demanded that nobody ever visit a zoo again because it is clearly a dangerous place for all humans, and that zoos support attacks on women. Zoo security are harassed and criticized for not preventing the attack. Children grow up believing that all animals should be caged, killed or physically removed from the presence of humans.

Posted by: CommonSense88 | February 20, 2011 4:31 AM | Report abuse

First, thank you, Lara Logan, as I'm a student from Egypt, studying at Stanford, and I appreciate your fortitude, and I'm so sorry this occurred. I read through the comments and this one below, posted over a week ago, resonates most for me and my friends. I do hope you are healing, and I'm so sorry for what occurred.

Leila


Lara Logan is one of the top journalists in the world. Articulate, insightful, brave, compassionate and courageous. She's covered some of the most volcanic stories in hot spots throughout the world - Rwanda, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, and more -- on the highest level, and she's provided an objective and humane perspective, despite the chaos and madness. I saw her interview with Charlie Rose a few days prior to her assault, and she was quite reluctant to return to Cairo after being subjected to mental abuse and deprivation by the brutal security organization. The fact that Lara returned back to Cairo, after this, shows how dedicated she is to her craft, her profession, and to the cataclysmic events that shake our world. What occurred last week was tragic and horrific. But Lara's a warrior, and she will recover, wounds and all. Right now may Lara heal with the warmth of family and friends. I imagine Lara will be covering another heated event or story in the near future. After all, Lara Logan, is one of, if not the best, foreign correspondent in the world. God speed for healing and thank you for your courage and outstanding work!

Posted by: StevenSikes | February 16, 2011 9:25 AM

Posted by: vistablues | February 21, 2011 9:01 PM | Report abuse

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