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Posted at 7:00 AM ET, 02/ 4/2011

Missing man found through LoJack

By Allison Klein
Allison Klein

An 85-year-old man with Alzheimer's disease who had wandered away from his Arlington home for six hours Wednesday was quickly located by police through a LoJack person finder program.

The man, who was missing from the 1500 block of Danville Street, was found within 15 minutes once police activated the automatic finder, police said.

The man's family had enrolled him in the Project Lifesaver Program three days earlier, according to police. The program, in which a person wears a wrist-watch sized radio transmitter on their wrist or ankle, is aimed at tracking and rescuing people with cognitive conditions who tend to wander from home.

The transmitter constantly emits a radio frequency signal that can be tracked anywhere. Arlington County police have 11 officers who are are certified as electronic search specialists through Project Lifesaver International.

For more information, click here.

By Allison Klein  | February 4, 2011; 7:00 AM ET
Categories:  Allison Klein, Arlington  
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Comments

Happy to hear this man was found within 15 minutes after activating the finder. Wonder why though an 85 year old man with Alzheimer's was wandering for 6 hours. It was cold on Wednesday. Did no one report him before that time or did it take police that long to get it together after he was reported missing?

Posted by: gladiatorgal | February 4, 2011 9:50 AM | Report abuse

Obviously ... it appears so.

Posted by: alligator10 | February 4, 2011 9:55 AM | Report abuse

What good news, and it seems that this is a technology that more people should learn about.

Posted by: edallan | February 4, 2011 11:18 AM | Report abuse

This article doesn't mention whether or not this man lives alone, unless I missed it. I'm glad LoJack helped police track this man, but even with LoJack, I still hope this man isn't living alone. Letting an Alzheimer's patient live alone is like allowing a 5 year old to live alone.

Posted by: CAmira5 | February 4, 2011 2:55 PM | Report abuse

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