Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

John Lennon's killer up for parole

John Lennon's killer will seek his freedom this week for a sixth time.

Mark David Chapman is scheduled to appear before a parole board at Attica Correctional Facility in upstate New York. It's Division of Parole policy to identify only the week, not the day, the hearing will take place.

Parole officials are expected to release their decision the day after the hearing and a transcript about a week later.

The former maintenance man from Hawaii has been in prison nearly 30 years for gunning down the former Beatle on a Manhattan sidewalk in 1980. He was sentenced to 20 years to life after pleading guilty to second-degree murder.

Now 55, Chapman has been denied parole five times, appearing before the board every two years since 2000.

-- Associated Press

By Washington Post Editors  |  August 9, 2010; 10:37 AM ET
Categories:  Around the Nation , Celebrities  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: 7-Eleven clerk killed in Md. robbery
Next: 2 hurt as car hits building in Md.

Comments

Let him rot!

Posted by: Bebunk | August 9, 2010 10:49 AM | Report abuse

I agree with Bebunk. Let him rot in prison until he croaks.

Posted by: 7891 | August 9, 2010 11:18 AM | Report abuse

No parole, now or ever. The creep stole my childhood from me. I hope he ides a miserable and painful death in jail.

Posted by: adrienne_najjar | August 9, 2010 11:37 AM | Report abuse

He's been given privileges that many other prisoners have never gotten, and I haven't the foggiest idea why that is. He shot a peace loving man in cold blood - begging the fans to forgive him. Do Yoko or her son Sean Lennon forgive him? I think he needs to stay in prison for the rest of his life, no special privileges or visits. Be treated like every other prisoner on a life sentence for premeditated murder.

Posted by: LyndaLBD | August 9, 2010 11:38 AM | Report abuse

He's been given privileges that many other prisoners have never gotten, and I haven't the foggiest idea why that is. He shot a peace loving man in cold blood - begging the fans to forgive him. Do Yoko or her son Sean Lennon forgive him? I think he needs to stay in prison for the rest of his life, no special privileges or visits. Be treated like every other prisoner on a life sentence for premeditated murder.

Posted by: LyndaLBD | August 9, 2010 11:42 AM | Report abuse

Maybe after Paul and Ringo are both gone....

On second thought- NEVER!

Posted by: justmike | August 9, 2010 11:50 AM | Report abuse

He gets out the day that John Lennon comes back to life. Oh, not going to happen, so guess what, he does not get out. He should be in a small cell all day. This just makes me so mad I can hardly type. John Lennon's death will always cause pain.

Posted by: jtsw | August 9, 2010 12:03 PM | Report abuse

When you walk up and shoot someone in the back you get eligible for parole??? Only in America.

Posted by: highwaybluesoccer | August 9, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

People are bread and taught that violence works to solve problems and men like John Lennon were able to overcome this a preach peace.

Society also teaches that locking people in prison is a way to solve problems, but it isn't. Using prison, especially when one is locked in their cell for 23 hours a day for the rest of their life, is not humane-like torture.

I am not sure what to do about the problem because of course with some people they will continue to make it seem that they will kill or rob unless you stop them. Being an educated man I understand that there is an afterlife, so part of me thinks it is just better to 'kill' these people and send them there, instead of incarcerating them.

All I get is prison is inhumane and someone needs to come up with some better solutions to solve the problem of 'crime.'

Posted by: RobertCurleyJacobs | August 9, 2010 12:51 PM | Report abuse

No parole, now or ever. The creep stole my childhood from me. I hope he ides a miserable and painful death in jail.

Posted by: adrienne_najjar | August 9, 2010 11:37 AM
=========================================
adrienne_najjar--
If I may play devil's advocate: You write, " The creep stole my childhood from me." It typically takes anywhere from 5-7 years to fully recover from a traumatic emotional loss -- and the first year of pain is so debilitating that survivors are often urged not to make any serious or significant financial decisions during that time. After 7 years have passed, however, then it is incumbent upon the victim to decide exactly how s/he will deal with the pain. Will s/he face the pain and come to terms with it? Or will s/he avoid the pain and proceed through the rest of his/her life burdened with emotional baggage that s/he is not even aware of?

Will you or will you not seek out a psychotherapist to learn how to deal with your emotional pain? If you choose not to face your pain, then you are allowing Mark David Chapman to have a (certain degree) of power over you. The power to choose is yours and yours alone; it only goes to Chapman of you let it.

Posted by: nbahn | August 9, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

Posted by: nbahn | August 9, 2010 1:06 PM |

It typically takes anywhere from 5-7 years to fully recover from a traumatic emotional loss -- and the first year of pain is so debilitating that survivors are often urged not to make any serious or significant financial decisions during that time. After 7 years have passed, however, then it is incumbent upon the victim to decide exactly how s/he will deal with the pain. Will s/he face the pain and come to terms with it? Or will s/he avoid the pain and proceed through the rest of his/her life burdened with emotional baggage that s/he is not even aware of?

Will you or will you not seek out a psychotherapist to learn how to deal with your emotional pain? If you choose not to face your pain, then you are allowing Mark David Chapman to have a (certain degree) of power over you. The power to choose is yours and yours alone; it only goes to Chapman of you let it.

I would argue, each death has led a traumatic scar that is just too deep.

John F. Kennedy
Abraham Lincoln
Martin Luther King Jr.
Robert F. Kennedy
Malcolm X

would be deaths,
Ronald Reagan-ask Jim Brady has he gotten over it?
Gerald Ford

Then you have things like Columbine

Its a very traumatic thing to live through someone who was gunned down. And its more like we're speaking for Lennon, rather than Chapman having power over us.

Posted by: bflaherty5 | August 9, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

They'll never let him out. Chapman wanted to be immortalized as the guy who killed Lennon. There have to be people out there who dream about being immortalized as the person who killed Chapman.

Posted by: nonsensical2001 | August 9, 2010 2:03 PM | Report abuse

Too bad someone hasn't already put MDC out of his misery. He should NEVER be paroled, but I don't want my taxes paying for his care and feeding either.

Posted by: doobrah | August 9, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

highwaybluesoccer:

Correction: Only in America, every country in Europe, Central America, South America, Australia, Japan, etc.

There may be one or two countries in the world that exclusively demand the death penalty or life in prison for murder, but it would be a country like Saudi Arabia or Iran, countries we usually don't try to emulate.

Is there even any evidence that sentences longer than 20 years have any additional deterrent effect on recidivism? I'm not aware of any such studies. If it doesn't have any such effect, then what's the point of keeping them in prison other than simple revenge?

Also, if this guy had killed some random person rather than a celebrity probably none of you would care. Should the crime be considered worse just because he killed a celebrity?

Posted by: joggle | August 9, 2010 2:14 PM | Report abuse

I have a slightly different view of this, given all the attrocities that foreign national gangs, illegals and terrorists get by with these days especially in view of the third world anarchy this nation is becoming under Obama and the anti American Democrats. It’s a take off on John Lennon for Mark David Chapman - sing along now.

Imagine there's no pardon.
It isn't hard to do.
You see there's aging millions
Of hippies mad at you.

And then there is George Soros
Who sings this line each day.
"Imagine there's no country"
He's almost got his way.

Imagine that, Paroley,
When your time is near,
Some liberal aholie
Will keep you locked up there.

Imagine no forgiveness
The problem isn’t when
They give it to illegals
But you’re American.

Posted by: Patriot12 | August 9, 2010 2:36 PM | Report abuse

I had hoped that someone in prison would have done away with Chapman many years ago. If ever their was a senseless murder his murder of John Lennon was it. As a Lennon fan I hope that Chapman is released and that someone out there will kill him so they can become famous.

Posted by: jimeglrd8 | August 9, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

will the liberals who want this parole please stand up and go home.
Chapman took a life (can't remember why received second degree murder rather than first degree) and has no right to walk among us.

And no -- I am not going to "put this behind me" or "move past it". It takes very little emotional effort to maintain my preference to keep the guy locked up, so why not just do that?

Posted by: jimbob3 | August 9, 2010 3:44 PM | Report abuse

I say let him out.

He'll be running scared the rest of his (hopefully short) life.

Posted by: Etek | August 9, 2010 4:12 PM | Report abuse

Parole, are you kidding me. He does not deserve parole and he doesn't deserve us even discussing it. He took away the father of two sons, and the husband of a wife. He took away a brillant song writer and performer from millions of fans. Anyone who kills does not deserve freedom.

Posted by: mcestel | August 9, 2010 10:41 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company