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Vanity plate helps snare suspect

By Washington Post Editors

A vanity plate made it easy for police to track down a New Hampshire robbery suspect, according to this report:

A person in a nearby parking lot noticed something strange was going on.
"He watched her get in the vehicle and fled the area," Willard said. "He got a plate number, and while he was following this woman, she was throwing items out of her vehicle."
The license plate reported by the witness was B-USHER, which police said was registered to Bonnie Usher, 43. Usher was arrested at her home a short time later and charged with armed robbery.

Read the full story on the WMUR web site.

By Washington Post Editors  | November 15, 2010; 8:21 AM ET
Categories:  Around the Nation, Offbeat  
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Comments

I say we need to make vanity plates more than seven digits. More room for braggarts to show off their criminality!

Posted by: bs2004 | November 15, 2010 9:30 AM | Report abuse

Well as the name implies "vanity plates", it's normally someone trying to call attention to himself/herself.
Probably should have thought about that before committing a crime in her own car...complete brilliance!

Posted by: BigDaddy651 | November 15, 2010 10:48 AM | Report abuse

Surprised we don't see more headlines like this in Virginia, where, by vanity plate count, more than 1 in 6 cars has a vain owner.

With the budget being what in the shape it's in, the state should hike fees on these vanities--let's discover how elastic the demand is, hmmm?

http://www.bookofodds.com/Daily-Life-Activities/Transportation/Articles/A0152-Dishing-on-Vanity-Plates

Posted by: __M__ | November 15, 2010 11:19 AM | Report abuse

bkalday= brooklyn all day

Posted by: bkallday | November 15, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

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