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Police provide more details on SUV-baby stroller collision

Washington Post editors

Update: 5:30 p.m.

Montgomery County police say the driver of an SUV, Amber Lou Hughes, was driving under “a steady green traffic signal” when a woman pushing a stroller crossed in front of her. Hughes' Ford Explorer struck the stroller. Hughes immediately stopped and remained on the scene.

Police identified the woman pushing the stroller as Samira Kailey, 36, of Sinking Spring, Pa. Her daughter, 16-month-old daughter Sylra Kailey, was injured, and late this afternoon was listed in “serious but stable condition” at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington.

Police also identified the off-duty nurse who came to Sylra’s help as Wendy Mejia.

Detectives ask anyone who witnessed the collision to call 240-773-5500.

Original post:

A 16-month-old girl whose stroller was struck by a SUV Friday morning is improving at a local hospital, police said this afternoon. Officials expect her to survive.

The baby’s mother was pushing the stroller across Georgia Avenue at Aspen Hill Road at 10:22 a.m., according to police. Witnesses say she appeared to be in the crosswalk. A 1998 green Ford Explorer, driven by a 53-year-old Silver Spring woman, hit the stroller. The driver stayed on the scene, and police said she was cooperating with crash investigators. Witnesses said the driver appeared to have a green light as she crossed Aspen Hill, police said.

Cars stopped all around the child. A passerby, believed by police to be a nurse, rushed to the child’s aid and started chest compressions, officials said.

Montgomery County Police Officer Brendon Johnston, a cop for slightly more than 10 years, was the first officer on the scene. The passerby looked at him.

“She’s not breathing, and I don’t have a pulse,” the woman said, Johnston recalled in an interview Friday afternoon.

Johnston took over chest compressions, using his fingertips, and noted the baby was bleeding from her nose. The two eventually picked up a faint pulse. The baby started gasping, Johnston said.

Within minutes, medics arrived. They soon were taking the baby to a hospital. Johnston headed there in his cruiser, thinking about his own family. His worries grew. After he arrived, a doctor told him the baby was crying, which Johnston took as a good sign.

“I’m glad the child is alive. I’m ecstatic,” Johnston said.

The child’s mother was not hit by the SUV, but was injured in the accident. Her physical injuries are not life-threatening.

-- Dan Morse

By Washington Post editors  | October 8, 2010; 5:25 PM ET
Categories:  Dan Morse, Montgomery, Traffic Accidents  
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Comments

This is extremely good news!

Posted by: mbrumble | October 8, 2010 3:15 PM | Report abuse

"The two eventually picked up a feint pulse."

***

I hope it was a "faint pulse"...

Posted by: DecafDrinker | October 8, 2010 3:28 PM | Report abuse

"After arriving, a doctor him the baby was crying, which he took as a good sign."
(Check spelling and grammar please)

Posted by: bronxace | October 8, 2010 4:17 PM | Report abuse

DecafDrinker and bronxace --

Thanks for the close reading. I fixed the spelling and grammar. Sorry for sloppiness.

-- Dan Morse

Posted by: Dan Morse | October 8, 2010 5:07 PM | Report abuse

Good news indeed! The driver stayed at the scene - a good samaritan and Officer Johnston saved the baby's life - it's so rare to hear of a good outcome from an accident like this. I hope the baby makes a full recovery.

Posted by: bookworm8 | October 8, 2010 5:19 PM | Report abuse

Good news indeed! The driver stayed at the scene - a good samaritan and Officer Johnston saved the baby's life - it's so rare to hear of a good outcome from an accident like this. I hope the baby makes a full recovery.

Posted by: bookworm8 | October 8, 2010 5:21 PM | Report abuse

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