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Shooting victim clears legal hurdle

A man who was shot five times outside a Fairfax County police station two years ago cleared his first legal hurdle, in his attempt to sue Fairfax and a police employee.

A judge ruled Friday that a hearing should be held to determine how severely incapacitated he was in the months after the shooting.

Najib Gerdak, 28, was standing in front of the Franconia district station on Feb. 2, 2008, when he was shot five times by Jeffrey S. Koger.

Gerdak said he had gone into the station to ask for help before the shooting, but a civilian employee was asleep at the front desk and sent him back outside after she woke up. He went outside and he then was shot. He said he then waited more than 30 minutes for an ambulance. He survived, but suffered permanent physical damage.

Gerdak's first attorneys filed suit only against Koger, who is imprisoned and has few assets, and did not believe they had a case against Fairfax. Gerdak hired another attorney who sued Fairfax in May, beyond the two-year statute of limitations.
On Friday, Fairfax attorneys argued that the case should be dismissed.

Katherine Martell, Gerdak's new attorney, responded that Gerdak was incapacitated for months after the shooting, and that the two-year clock should not have started until he was out of the hospital and able to make decisions. Virginia law does state that "the time during which he is incapacitated shall not be computed as any part of the [two-year] period." Gerdak's suit against Koger was not filed until March 2009, more than a year after the shooting.

Fairfax Assistant County Attorney John W. Burton said the state law provided for a two-year limit from the time of the injury, "no matter how extreme." Fairfax Circuit Court Judge Charles J. Maxfield responded, "So if a person is in a coma for two years, they've lost their cause of action?"

Maxfield said he didn't have enough information to decide if Gerdak was sufficiently incapacitated that the statute of limitations clock should have been stopped, and he ordered the two sides to schedule an evidentiary hearing.

Next Friday, Gerdak faces another legal hurdle: Fairfax's argument that it is protected from such lawsuits by "sovereign immunity," or the inability to sue a governmental entity for performing its duty. That hurdle can only be overcome by a showing of gross negligence.

-- Tom Jackman

By Tom Jackman  |  July 16, 2010; 1:34 PM ET
Categories:  Fairfax , From the Courthouse , Tom Jackman , Updates  
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Comments

Good for him, good for him.

Posted by: bigheadbull2 | July 16, 2010 2:02 PM | Report abuse

I would hope the the 2 year clock does indeed start whenever the injured party is capable of taking on legal proceedings.
It really isn't fair otherwise.
I hope Gerdak wins his point on that issue and is able to have his day in court on this.

Posted by: MarilynManson | July 16, 2010 2:19 PM | Report abuse

This suit will go no where. You can't sue the police for not protecting you.

Posted by: Dirty_Ferrel | July 16, 2010 2:34 PM | Report abuse

His former attorneys are dirtbags for failing to see the real case and for going on record that they plan to testify against their former client. There was no quick fix and easy pay out for them so they dumped their client! They would have had to spend the time to do the research and lay out minimal costs...imagine that, they would have actually had to do their jobs!

Posted by: OnYourCase | July 16, 2010 5:26 PM | Report abuse

His former attorneys are dirtbags for failing to see the real case and for going on record that they plan to testify against their former client. There was no quick fix and easy pay out for them so they dumped their client! They would have had to spend the time to do the research and lay out minimal costs...imagine that, they would have actually had to do their jobs!

Posted by: OnYourCase | July 16, 2010 5:27 PM | Report abuse

Was he under threat of arrest if he didn't go back outside in the line of fire. They would have to carry me out.

Posted by: Downwithbigotry | July 19, 2010 5:00 PM | Report abuse

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