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Posted at 2:42 PM ET, 02/21/2011

Loudoun realtor accused in fraud

By Maria Glod

A former Ashburn real estate agent who fled the country in July 2009 after she was accused in a $50 million mortgage fraud scheme was located in Turkey and returned to the United States, Loudoun County and state officials said Monday.

Diane H. Frederick Atari is scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday in Loudoun County Circuit Court.

Atari is accused of helping more than 100 people buy houses in Loudoun and Fairfax Counties that they couldn't afford, authorities said. She allegedly listed inflated credit scores and incomes for her clients so they could qualify for mortgages.

Many of Atari's clients could not afford their mortgage payments, and their homes went into foreclosure. At the time Atari was charged, authorities said she made about $1 million from the scheme.

Atari was charged with 10 counts of false statements to obtain credit, one count of money laundering and one count of racketeering.

By Maria Glod  | February 21, 2011; 2:42 PM ET
Categories:  From the Courthouse, Loudoun, Maria Glod  
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Comments

Of course this small fish will get the book thrown at her. But Angelo Mozilo, the head of Countrywide Financial and IndyMac Bank, both of which collapsed, has escaped all prosecution and according to Wikipedia, walked away with at least $470 million. Ain't free enterprise grand?

Posted by: hairguy01 | February 21, 2011 3:32 PM | Report abuse

It's true, almost all of the big fish in this global fraud got "punishments" like having to agree that they'll take their tens of millions of ill-gotten gain, and never be CEO of a company again. Ohhh, the pain!!! The PAAIIIINN!!!!! Ooohhhhh, they'll probably suffer for the rest of their lives! On beautiful beaches around the tropics, while the rest of us hang on for dear life.

Only a few guys like Madoff got nialed. And Madoff himself says that the bankers HAD to know what was going on.

Posted by: BobBruhns | February 21, 2011 6:16 PM | Report abuse

It's true, almost all of the big fish in this global fraud got "punishments" like having to agree that they'll take their tens of millions of ill-gotten gain, and never be CEO of a company again. Ohhh, the pain!!! The PAAIIIINN!!!!! Ooohhhhh, they'll probably suffer for the rest of their lives! On beautiful beaches around the tropics, while the rest of us hang on for dear life.

Only a few guys like Madoff got nailed. And Madoff himself says that the bankers HAD to know what was going on.

Posted by: BobBruhns | February 21, 2011 6:16 PM | Report abuse

(Sorry about the duplication, the entry screen locked up)

Posted by: BobBruhns | February 21, 2011 6:17 PM | Report abuse

I live in Riverdale Maryland on a property called Riverdale Village and if you come and visit this property you would know what I am talking about. I been having problems such as bedbugs to where one of my children had to go to the doctor and be treated for his bites. I also have water damage and numerous hosing code violation. I also went without electric in my bedroom for months and had to tell them I was going to call Pepco, before they send someone to come and fix the problem. I end up receiving a letter telling me I had to move. When I found some where to move they ended up giving me a bad reference and I didn't get the place. Now me and my family is facing eviction, because we complained about the conditions of our apartment. Another one of our neighbor called code enforcement on the property and now she is facing eviction on March 1st. I can't believe that landlords are allow to have their tenants to live under any kind of conditions and not be held liable. To me there are all kinds of illegal scams out here that people can get away with and the innocent end up suffering for. Thank you and may God bless. If you can help us here Please e-mail me at hicksonmichele@yahoo.com

Posted by: hicksonmichele | February 21, 2011 11:13 PM | Report abuse


I've dealt with 123 mortgage refi on two refis now, and in each case it was about as painless as anything that involves paperwork by the acre can possibly be. I would heartily recommend his services without reservation for those thinking of refi.

Posted by: ellielewis55 | February 22, 2011 1:12 AM | Report abuse


After dealing with several lenders in Austin, I finally called 123 mortgage refi.I am a Realtor, and have several relationships in the mortgage business including major banks. I wish I would have been introduced to 123 sooner. They got solution to lower your interest

Posted by: ellielewis55 | February 22, 2011 1:14 AM | Report abuse

Love the irony - in an article about mortage fraud, there are two posts above mine that are obviously spam, and probably from a company that is a scam in it's own right. People, if you don't want to get ripped off, then it's probably not a good idea get a mortage from a company that puts "123" in front of it's name - I mean seriously, who falls for this stuff? Probably the same people who would think it's a good deal to do business with 123 Auto Insurance or 123 Cash Loans.

Posted by: drklahn | February 22, 2011 9:25 AM | Report abuse

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