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Posted at 3:01 PM ET, 02/ 9/2011

Plot suspect considered shooting: FBI

By Maria Glod

A Baltimore man accused of plotting to blow up a military recruiting station in Maryland had at times discussed burning down the building, shooting people inside and using propane tanks in the attack, according to newly released court papers.

Antonio Martinez, 21, rejected the idea of targeting a train station because he worried it would "turn public opinion against" him, according to the documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.

He told an informant it was wrong to target innocent people, such as riders on a train, but wanted to send a message that "whoever joins the military will be killed."

Martinez, who recently converted to Islam and changed his name to Muhammad Hussain, saw the military as a threat to Muslims, according to court papers.

The FBI learned of Martinez's radical leanings on Facebook and through an informant. Authorities secretly joined the plot and supplied Martinez with a fake car bomb he tried to detonate in December outside a recruiting center in Catonsville.

In a recently unsealed affidavit for a search warrant seeking information on Martinez's Facebook account, FBI Special Agent J. Joseph Galietta wrote that Martinez told an informant he worried he might freeze up during the planned attack, and that the killings were "for the sake of Allah."

Martinez is awaiting trial in federal court in Maryland on charges of attempted murder of federal officers and attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction.In previous court hearings, Martinez's attorney has said there is a "very legitimate issue as to whether the government entrapped" his client.

By Maria Glod  | February 9, 2011; 3:01 PM ET
Categories:  From the Courthouse, Maria Glod, Maryland, Updates  
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Comments

Does the suspect's voiced intent to harm only military service members indicate that he is a prisoner of war rather than a criminal?

Many terrorism cases have pitfalls in them that aren't always evident on first reading.

For example, the Loudon County jihadist who was arrested for photographing subway stations had offered to raise money for and recruit supporters for jihad. But the undercover agents said, no, forget the money, forget the expansion of the cell, just keep snapping photographs. Who would reject cash?

Then down in Miami, they had a terror cell that functioned only when they poured money into it. When they failed to provide expense money, the jihadists had other things to do. They're going to prison too.

Posted by: blasmaic | February 9, 2011 4:30 PM | Report abuse

Does the suspect's voiced intent to harm only military service members indicate that he is a prisoner of war rather than a criminal?

Many terrorism cases have pitfalls in them that aren't always evident on first reading.

For example, the Loudon County jihadist who was arrested for photographing subway stations had offered to raise money for and recruit supporters for jihad. But the undercover agents said, no, forget the money, forget the expansion of the cell, just keep snapping photographs. Who would reject cash?

Then down in Miami, they had a terror cell that functioned only when they poured money into it. When they failed to provide expense money, the jihadists had other things to do. They're going to prison too.

Posted by: blasmaic | February 9, 2011 4:32 PM | Report abuse

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