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Posted at 3:01 PM ET, 01/20/2011

Elena Kagan not selected for jury duty

By Keith L. Alexander
Washington Post Editors

UPDATE: Kagan was not selected for a jury, and was released Thursday afternoon.

ORIGINAL POST: Even a Supreme has to report to jury duty.

Seen waiting in the jury lounge at D.C. Superior Court Thursday was the newest Supreme Court Justice, Elena Kagan.


Kagan. (File Photo/AP)

Kagan, who assumed the bench in August after being nominated by President Obama in May, sat with dozens of others potential jurors Thursday morning waiting to see if her juror badge number would be called.

Late last year, U.S. Attorney Eric Holder also reported to jury duty, but never made it onto a jury.

By Keith L. Alexander  | January 20, 2011; 3:01 PM ET
Categories:  From the Courthouse, Keith L. Alexander, The District  
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Comments

They're usually eliminated in a peremtory challenge (if the attorneys present recognize them).

Posted by: blasmaic | January 20, 2011 2:04 PM | Report abuse

Bush was never called for jury duty. He was deemed to be intellectually deficient, unable to comprehend simple rules of evidence.

Posted by: analyst72 | January 20, 2011 2:20 PM | Report abuse

One of the questions on the jury qualification form asks if you are a member of law enforcement. While not exactly a policemen, or attorney I think a Supreme Court justice might quailify as a member iof law enforcement.

Posted by: Jimof1913 | January 20, 2011 4:53 PM | Report abuse

The prosecution realized she is a totally biased jurist and was summarily discharged.

Posted by: daveschauer | January 20, 2011 5:13 PM | Report abuse

I was in the jury pool with Justice Kagan today. The jury pool, including Justice Kagan, was released at 2 pm because all courts reported that they did not anticipating seating a jury in the remainder of the day. In other words, Justice Kagan, and 100 plus others, never made it to a jury panel for voir dire and thus was never questioned by a judge or attorneys or stricken from a panel.

Posted by: kkdble | January 20, 2011 9:49 PM | Report abuse

This is so stupid. I guess they were trying to make a point about showing up on these jury summonses. I just toss them in the fireplace.

Posted by: prickles1009 | January 21, 2011 7:49 AM | Report abuse

Lawyers hate lawyers on juries.

Posted by: jckdoors | January 21, 2011 8:53 AM | Report abuse

she sat right behind me - boring day but better than going to work.

Hey prickles1009, that knock at your door is a warrant for your arrest!

Posted by: juantana | January 21, 2011 9:27 AM | Report abuse

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