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Frustration over snowy parking bubbles over in Loudoun

The frustration of having to shovel out parking spaces -- and the etiquette of respecting that shoveling -- erupted into more than just words in Loudoun County in recent days.

In a Sterling apartment complex Monday afternoon, a cab driver got a call from his dispatcher asking him to move his taxi. When he went out to the taxi, the Loudoun sheriff's office reports, one of his rear tires was flat.

Sheriff's deputies contacted the cab company, and then the original caller. The caller said he had called police, and admitted that he was upset that the taxi was parked in a space from which he had shoveled the snow in the 21900 block of Muirfield Circle, police said.

But the disgruntled shoveler said he did not let the air out of the tire, police said, and the driver did not press charges.

On Friday, also in Sterling, a person parked in a space that had previously been shoveled by another person, in the 21200 block of Huntington Square. The victim then found that his tires had been slashed.

Acknowledging that he had not shoveled the space himself, "the victim believes this may be the motivation behind the act," sheriff's officials noted.

-- Tom Jackman


By Tom Jackman  |  February 16, 2010; 9:53 AM ET
Categories:  Loudoun , Tom Jackman  | Tags: Loudoun parking dispute; snow parking tires damaged; Loudoun tires damaged parking  
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Comments

Did people put something in the spot to save it when they left?

Posted by: thetan | February 16, 2010 11:46 AM | Report abuse

Karmic.

Posted by: HughJassPhD | February 16, 2010 11:52 AM | Report abuse

This will make for a riveting episode of CSI Loudon County. The trials and tribulations of N. Va. suburban living are being well chronicled here.

Posted by: SWB2 | February 16, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

That's what they get. These drivers knew they didn't shovelout those spaces. They are just being free loaders.

Posted by: PepperDr | February 16, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

And people talk about Prince George's County??!!

Posted by: kathie2 | February 16, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

I'll support people's right to "save" public property as soon as it works both ways. My neighborhood is littered with cars that haven't been dug out since prior to the storms, creating problems for the plows. There are even multiple cars (at least five in a half mile stretch) that have begun parking perpendicular to the road instead of parellel to avoid shoveling snow.
Question - if I run out and shovel out my neighbors car, is it my space as soon as he moves?

Posted by: justanotherguy | February 16, 2010 12:02 PM | Report abuse

In PG, they would have shot the windows out, or the driver.

Posted by: maus92 | February 16, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse

How about the people who park in my carport (i.e. private property) while my husband has the car away at work? I've asked nicely for them to move several times...now it is time to call a tow truck. Am I missing some unspoken rule or being reasonable?

Posted by: JD110 | February 16, 2010 12:12 PM | Report abuse

LOL @ the person who called the dispatch claiming he or she didn't slash the tires. Yeah, right. Who else had the motive to? The driver should have pressed charges.

Posted by: bum1 | February 16, 2010 12:20 PM | Report abuse

This reminds me of the 1996 storm. Two guys got in a tussle over a stormshovel and one of them beat the other guy to death with it and left him in a snowbank. Funny as hell.

Posted by: FridayKnight | February 16, 2010 12:23 PM | Report abuse

This reminds me of the 1996 storm. Two guys got in a tussle over a snowshovel and one of them beat the other guy to death with it and left him in a snowbank. Funny as hell.

Posted by: FridayKnight | February 16, 2010 12:24 PM | Report abuse

Pretty mild response, as far as I'm concerned. I would have torched the b@st@rd's car if they'd parked in my spot having just dug out 3' of snow.

Posted by: JoStalin | February 16, 2010 12:27 PM | Report abuse

A shooting could happen there just as easily as Prince George's.

Posted by: kathie2 | February 16, 2010 12:28 PM | Report abuse

Some people are so egocentric that they can't imagine that it would be a problem for them to steal a space someone else spent hours shoveling. Their rationalizing must be: "how nice of someone to shovel out one of the unreserved spaces for me". Unreserved spaces are reserved by shoveling!

Yes, it's inconvenient. We asked guests to carpool to a party Sunday evening and asked them to park at a shopping center nearby. I drove over to pick up each carload since the sidewalks are piled with snow from the streets.

I live in a townhouse community in Fairfax County, and if someone parked in the space I shoveled out, my first inclination would be to smash out every window or slash the tires. However, I would probably just let the air out of the tires, like the person in the story. The parking space theif got off easy.

Posted by: DWinFC | February 16, 2010 12:30 PM | Report abuse

Driver is supposed to just KNOW that if the spot is shoveled, someone "owns" it. Wow, slashed tires as a FIRST response. Very classy move. How about leaving a note on the windshield asking them to move it with your name and address? And it's counterproductive, disabling the car so that it ties up your spot even longer. I'd say filling your tires partially with pepper spray would be a reasonable defense.

Posted by: tomwi53092 | February 16, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

There is one big problem with retaliation: Let's say that you dig your car out and leave a cone. Then, person A moves the cone and parks, then leaves. Then, person B, seeing no cone and an empty spot, parks. Then, you come back to see person B's car in your spot and the cone moved. If you retaliate, you will be doing so against an innocent person. See the problem?

Posted by: ewexler1 | February 16, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

And people talk about Prince George's County??!!

true. soon, VA can carry guns out to these disputes

Posted by: mloaks | February 16, 2010 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Re: did they put something in the spot to mark it when they left - doesn't matter. This morning someone had the nerve to physically MOVE my space markers up, and my husband's back, and park RIGHT BETWEEN them, thereby taking up two spaces with his 4-WHEEL DRIVE JEEP that could have easily parked on any given snow mound. People not only don't care, they will take your space(s) out of spite. They need to be taught a lesson.

Posted by: lmk1 | February 16, 2010 12:38 PM | Report abuse

Now we have people on this forum suggesting that there are people cruising around looking for someone elses' parking space to steal. What if I had dug my car out and run an errand. Understanding the LAW and that a space I may have dug out IS NOT MY PROPERTY, I find another empty space and park in it. Tell me brilliant ones, what would you have done???

Virginia being such a law and order and execution friendly state, I would thnik that more of those who say that those who park in a space they did not clean "get what they deserve would know a bit more about what is legal and what is not. If you were to assaoult me for parking in your space, I can assure you that I would prosecute. What blowhards.

Posted by: tradeczar | February 16, 2010 12:42 PM | Report abuse

In PG, they would have shot the windows out, or the driver.

Posted by: maus92 | February 16, 2010 12:04 PM | Report abuse
=========================================
I'm shocked being that its N. Virginia, that MS13 didn't chop the drivers hands off.

Posted by: clark202 | February 16, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

That's what they get. These drivers knew they didn't shovelout those spaces. They are just being free loaders.

Posted by: PepperDr | February 16, 2010 11:57 AM | Report abuse

LOL!!!! Sorry but if the spaces are not reserved then they don't belong to you. It really makes little difference if you dug it out or not. I've been in a hotel for the last month while on assignment for work. The same applies there. We don't have spaces and of course you had to do a certain amount of digging just to get the car out but that's life.

Posted by: askgees | February 16, 2010 12:56 PM | Report abuse

Some people are so egocentric that they can't imagine that it would be a problem for them to steal a space someone else spent hours shoveling. Their rationalizing must be: "how nice of someone to shovel out one of the unreserved spaces for me". Unreserved spaces are reserved by shoveling!


________________________________________
LOL it doesn't work that way. Just because you dug it out you don't become the owner. If you want your own space then you better have a driveway or marked spaces. Other than that it's fair game. But I guess the sidewalk you dug out belongs to you also. LOL. Friggin id1ot.

Posted by: askgees | February 16, 2010 1:01 PM | Report abuse

This sense of entitlement to parking spots on city streets truly amazes and offends me. I live in a condo in Alexandria where parking is competitive on a regular basis. Now I'm supposed to accept that just because someone had the good forture (or more probably are a stay at home parent, work from home, are retired, unemployed, etc.) to have claimed a choice parking spot in one of our condo's parking lots (which are all unassigned spots) or on the street nearby their unit before the FIRST snow storm hit and shovelled that spot, they are entitled to keep that spot into perpetuity (or until all this snow melts)??! And I should be forced to park a half mile away?? That is total B.S. I put my "sweat equity" into shovelling out of 2 parking spots, as well as clearing sidewalks. But guess what, I don't own those spots. If I choose to leave a spot, I lose it. If you're so concerned with losing your spot, my suggestions are (1) don't leave; (2) call a cab; or better yet (3) check out the public transportation options in your neighborhood. Anyone who damages another's property for parking in "their spot" deserves to get caught/fined/jailed and I'm sending all such persons lots of bad karma.

Posted by: hjc1234 | February 16, 2010 1:03 PM | Report abuse

wild guess that none of the people who think cleared spaces are up for grabs haven't recently come home to find the space they spent half a day digging out, and carefully marked in accordance with neighborhood practice, taken by someone who shamelessly tossed aside their space markers, and nowhere else to park within blocks of their home. just a guess.

Posted by: lmk1 | February 16, 2010 1:03 PM | Report abuse

And people talk about Prince George's County??!!
Posted by: kathie2 | February 16, 2010 11:57 AM |
==============

You must understand, they're talking about mostly "WHITE" people in Loudon Co and mostly "BLACK" people in Prince Georges Co.
feel me???


Posted by: demtse | February 16, 2010 1:04 PM | Report abuse

If you didn't shovel out the spot, its not yours, and that's what you get (slashed tires) for parking in it.

Posted by: 123cartoon | February 16, 2010 1:08 PM | Report abuse

You go, hjc1234!!!!

Building on that, let's say I visit a good friend in NOVA. Am I supposed to bring a shovel to "make" my own spot, lest my car get vandalized?

Posted by: ewexler1 | February 16, 2010 1:08 PM | Report abuse


And people talk about Prince George's County??!!
Posted by: kathie2 | February 16, 2010 11:57 AM |
==============

You must understand, they're talking about "WHITE" people in Loudon Co and "BLACK" people in Prince Georges Co.
feel me???


Posted by: demtse | February 16, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

Everyone, at some point, had to dig their car out of the snow. So, I'm curious to those that are saving their spot or upset that someone else parked in a spot they dug out: Why do you think you deserve that particular spot - what makes it different from regular parking (first come first parked) during all other types of weather? And at what point do you go back to regular parking habits?

Posted by: DelRayGrl16 | February 16, 2010 1:09 PM | Report abuse

lmk1, you are WRONG. As someone who has been in DC for the past 10 years, I have experienced BOTH sides of this issue.

And if it took you 1/2 the day to dig out your spot, you are doing something wrong. I would suggest using a shovel instead of a coffee mug or whatever it is that you must be using to be so inefficient.

Posted by: ewexler1 | February 16, 2010 1:11 PM | Report abuse

lmk1 - cleared spaces are up for grabs. I cleared two spaces in front of my townhouse. Everyday I come home and the spaces are empty, waiting for me. Why? Because I own them. I paid for them when I bought the townhouse, they are listed in the closing documents, they are mine. If you all want reserved parking - buy it like the rest of us. If you want to park in spaces that were paid for by the public, then you share them with the public. Over the weekend a snow plow created a wall of snow between our parking lot and the road. I grabbed a shovel and moved it so cars can get through. Do I now get to keep the entire parking lot? As far as I'm concerned, claiming public property as your own is theft.

Posted by: justanotherguy | February 16, 2010 1:15 PM | Report abuse

By the way, when those of you who have "reserved" spaces take your car out, where do you go and where do you park?

Posted by: justanotherguy | February 16, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

I think some posters here are missing the point. On my street, at least, if someone else has parked in your shoveled spot (most likely a visitor to the neighborhood, since all residents HAD to shovel out their cars), there is NO PLACE else to put your car. There is no place to even pull over. So you are must actually leave your car in the middle of the street, blocking traffic, while you start on an hours=long task of shoveling another space. That makes sense?

To me, if you are going to someone else's neighborhood, take a cab or public transportation. OR take your car -- and a shovel --and get your own space, not someone else's.

Posted by: trace1 | February 16, 2010 1:22 PM | Report abuse

Anyone who shovels out a space in this environment should be allowed to keep it. We shouldn't need laws to enforce that, it should be a matter of common decency.

But, alas, we live in a world of pigs, who lie, cheat and steal as long as they can get away with it.

To those of you who think it is ok to park in a spot carefully and lovingly shoveled by a nearby resident, go f yourselves. You make this a litigious society with your greediness.

And because of you, we need a law. Yes, another stupid law to put on the books what should have been and once was common sense and decency. Congratulations on being a part of the problem. Your parents and ancestors should be ashamed.

Posted by: public-washingtonpost-com | February 16, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

William Golding (Lord of the Flies) had it right. So did Hemingway and Twain. God, I hate humanity, no wonder He decided to flood the world once and wipe the slate clean.

Posted by: playahatah | February 16, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

First off, everyone in the region had to dig their car out of the snow (unless you have a garage, of course). So the whole, "I spent hours digging my car out" argument is really invalid if you look at the circumstances -EVERYONE did! I spent 2 hours digging my car out and just drove away. You know why? It is not my space. I do not rent or own it. I have no claim to it.

Don't get me wrong, if you're disabled or elderly, I don't see a problem with it. Honestly, it wouldn't be as bad if out-of-state cars weren't taking up precious spaces (MD and VA).

Posted by: mmurphy6 | February 16, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

to : DWinFC

you are an idiot. if you don't own the space you can't claim it. simple as that. plus your simplistic reasoning assumes the person who parked "your" shoveled spot didn't also shovel a spot previously. They just aren't a selfish self absorved a$$ like you.

Posted by: saurabhgup | February 16, 2010 1:35 PM | Report abuse

I am White and have been living in Prince George's County for the past five years in a nice upscale signal family residential community. I am one of the few white people that live here and my neighbors are all very friendly, hardworking people like myself. Just because Loudoun County is primarily white doesn't make them immune to stupid people living there.

Posted by: kathie2 | February 16, 2010 1:39 PM | Report abuse

That would have gotten you shot in Baltimore!

Posted by: onlysoccer | February 16, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Anyone who shovels out a space in this environment should be allowed to keep it. We shouldn't need laws to enforce that, it should be a matter of common decency.

But, alas, we live in a world of pigs, who lie, cheat and steal as long as they can get away with it.

To those of you who think it is ok to park in a spot carefully and lovingly shoveled by a nearby resident, go f yourselves. You make this a litigious society with your greediness.

And because of you, we need a law. Yes, another stupid law to put on the books what should have been and once was common sense and decency. Congratulations on being a part of the problem. Your parents and ancestors should be ashamed.

Posted by: public-washingtonpost-com | February 16, 2010 1:25 PM | Report

LOL and yet you think you have a claim on something you don't own. Greedy is one thing but stup1dity is another. What a dolt!!!

Posted by: askgees | February 16, 2010 1:46 PM | Report abuse

All of you who support violence and vandalism over a PARKING SPACE are a great example of what is wrong with the world. You don't own unreserved parking spaces, regardless of whether you shoveled it, painted it, or polished it with your tongue. Stop being selfish and destructive and setting bad examples for our youth. Find another place to park, or help by shoveling what you can. There is NEVER an excuse to destroy someone else's property or to harm them. You don't own the world. Get over it.

Posted by: LitLady | February 16, 2010 1:48 PM | Report abuse

wild guess that none of the people who think cleared spaces are up for grabs haven't recently come home to find the space they spent half a day digging out, and carefully marked in accordance with neighborhood practice, taken by someone who shamelessly tossed aside their space markers, and nowhere else to park within blocks of their home. just a guess.

Posted by: lmk1 | February 16, 2010 1:03 PM | Report abuse

SO. What is that is so hard for you to figure out. If you don't own it then it isn't yours. It makes no difference whether or not you dug it out. LOL

Posted by: askgees | February 16, 2010 1:50 PM | Report abuse

This happened in my neighborhood, yesterday. The trifling neighbor has not bothered to shovel around his property; he just commandeers spots in front of other's homes. This morning he came out and discovered that he was blocked in, unable to leave for work.

Posted by: StLou | February 16, 2010 1:59 PM | Report abuse

All you people who feel you OWN a public space on a public street are CRAZY. So what if you shoveled it out. It does not entitle you to that spot for the next 3 weeks it is going to take for the snow to melt. Can you imagine if everyone did this? Get a grip. Natural turnover of cars occurs on PUBLIC streets for PUBLIC parking. If it's not your driveway, it's not YOUR spot. I live in Georgetown where some people put objects out once they leave a space. My husband and I dug our car out, but when we leave, we certainly do NOT claim the space because it's on the street...AND I'M PREGNANT. I wish we had somewhere to put the snow in our PERSONALLY OWNED driveway. Then we would not have to deal with all you morons who think you own a spot on the street because of a little sweat equity. So...if you sweep off a patch of sidewalk, do you own that, too? THINK PEOPLE!

Posted by: shell1 | February 16, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

Unless you have reserved parking spaces, just because you shoveled out a parking space does not mean it is yours until the spring thaw. I live in an Arlington, VA, condo where the parking is not reserved and there are not enough spots in parking lots for all residents. As another poster pointed out, just because someone happened to be lucky enough to have a spot in the lot on the day of the first storm does not mean they own it for perpetuity. I had a spot and I shoveled it but I had no claim on it once I vacated it. I cannot believe the attitudes of those who think that because they shoveled, they own it. We all shoveled. If you want reserved parking, go live somewhere where you have an exclusive spot. If my neighbors continue to try and claim spots this week, I intend to start removing their traffic cones, etc.

Posted by: lgp2 | February 16, 2010 2:25 PM | Report abuse

Loudon rednecks? Hard to resist since PG Co. always gets trashed so much.

Posted by: seaduck2001 | February 16, 2010 2:30 PM | Report abuse

LOL!! I am a 40+ woman and shoveled over 3' ft of snow on and around my med size SUV...all by myself and as soon as I moved someone took my spot!! I would have liked to but opted not too :-(... but Ohhh I do enjoy reading that someone else did take action! Good for them!

Posted by: WhoisS | February 16, 2010 2:31 PM | Report abuse

I understand both sides of the issue. However, I live in a community of townhouses with unassigned parking. In my neighborhood, it is not simply a matter of finding another space if your space is taken. THERE ARE NO OTHER SPACES -- unshovelled or not. So if someone moves your marker from the space that you spent however long digging out, your are just out of luck. After having dug my car out of the space in front of my house, I left to go to work. I returned 8 hours later to NO parking space ANYWHERE in my neighborhood. So I parked on the lot of a local shopping center, only to have my car towed!! So now I put a marker out, and will defend that space!! It is very easy to say "buy the space" or "find another space". But what do you do when those options are not available?

Posted by: codeslinger63 | February 16, 2010 2:32 PM | Report abuse

You shoveled out the space so you could _leave_...

I don't get this reserved space business at all. I'm so glad I have a private driveway and garage.

Posted by: gbooksdc | February 16, 2010 2:32 PM | Report abuse

Once when I lived up north, I lived in an apartment that was part of a single family house. I parked in the street, and the owners had the driveway. One day before a snowstorm, I had to park in the street at the property line because someone else was parked in front of our place. I shoveled my car out afterwards, and the obnoxious neighbor next door was giving me dirty looks. When I came home from work one day, she had moved her car from her driveway to the spot I shoveled, leaving her driveway empty. She asked me, "You're not going to park in front of *my* house, are you?" I said, "No, I'd like to park in the spot that *I* shoveled." She wouldn't move her car. So I spent a couple more hours shoveling a new spot for my car.

Late that night, everyone went to bed. I went outside, and the garden hose was still connected. I decided to "wash" this woman's car for her. Well, more like rinse it with nice cold water. She came outside the next day to discover her car cacooned in a nice block of inch thick ice. Best thing was, it wasn't vandalism since the car was not damaged. Just, unusable for a week until she could chip all the ice off.

Posted by: thetan | February 16, 2010 2:37 PM | Report abuse

I'm having the same problem. I don't have off-street parking. I've had 3 spaces stolen from me that I personally dug out in the last two weeks. The thing is, it's not private property, the street is PUBLIC property. Technically, you can't "claim" a space. It's also illegal in DC. That doesn't stop people from trying. Got called a dirty name the other day, but I couldn't park anywhere else. Parked 2 blocks away from my apartment as it was. No matter what I do, people are jerks.

Posted by: futbolclif | February 16, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

I recently moved from a townhouse with nonreserved parking. Since the spaces were NONreserved, I never put anything in the spaces I cleared, and as a teacher, I usually had time to clear out several spaces, even though I have only one car. I figured that if you clear out 3 spaces, you are entitled to park in any nonreserved space. Correspondingly, I didn't necessarily refrain from parking in a space that someone else had "reserved."
In particular, if it was a space I had cleared out, I freely moved that bucket and parked there. That was the only part that really steamed me-someone "reserving" a space that I had cleared, especially when it was the neighbor with the SUV who didn't shovel his space, came back and the space he left was available, parked in a space I had cleared, and then marked that space as his. I am not normally vindictive, but that day I went out and moved his marker to his uncleared space and parked in the space I had cleared.

So now I live in a sfh, and I never have to worry about someone else parking in a space I have cleared out. I just get to clear a long driveway and six feet out into the street. It is probably the equivalent of 5 or six parking spaces.

Posted by: janedoe5 | February 16, 2010 2:55 PM | Report abuse

Digging out the snow no more entitles you to own a public parking space than shoveling the walk entitles you to charge a toll to pedestrians.

Posted by: AxelDC | February 16, 2010 2:55 PM | Report abuse

You people that think you own a space once you shovel it - where are you putting the snow? I assume that since it's your space, it's your snow, and you're therefore not dumping it on public property.

Posted by: justanotherguy | February 16, 2010 3:37 PM | Report abuse

This is quite the polarizing issue. Every neighborhood, indeed, sometimes every street, is different. On our street in NW DC, where there are no driveways, it is basically an unwritten code of civility and common decency among neighbors that you simply do not park in a space that someone else has dug out and has marked with lawn furniture, upside down trash cans, potted plants, or whatever they can find. Yes, it's technically illegal to do this, but everyone does it, so if you don't, you're effectively inviting someone to take the space, because it will be the ONLY empty space on the street. And the person who takes it invariably (as happened to me this morning, only my space WAS marked) is NOT one of your neighbors- it's someone who doesn't live on the street and therefore doesn't care who he or she ticks off. If you personally do not live on a street like this, I would submit that you have no business judging those who do. And I echo what an earlier poster said about basic human decency- "do unto others," etc. Sadly, the snow creates an "every man for himself" mentality for some. To those people, all I can say is, what goes around comes around.

Posted by: lmk1 | February 16, 2010 3:42 PM | Report abuse

They don't allow this space-saving crap in my apartment complex anymore because it gets in the way of the plows. For this last round of storms, the management went so far as to stick notices on all the entrances reminding everyone that parking is "first come, first serve" and "shoveling a space doesn't make it yours". They even said they would treat junk left in parking spaces as "abandoned property" and put it in the dumpster.

My only advice to those without reserved spaces would be to persistently hound the property owner to clear the parking lot until it gets done. Ultimately, snow removal falls under property maintenance--just like fixing your toilet--and it is their responsibility to see to it that residents paying them rent every month have a place to park (assuming the property has an on-site lot for residents' use).

Posted by: ComfortablyDumb | February 16, 2010 4:03 PM | Report abuse

If someone shovels snow from a parking spot then it clearly becomes the temporary private property of the shoveler. The shoveler should get a temperary deed good till the snow melts. Until that point, they should be allowed to shoot or stab people who violate their now-private space, and then mutilate the body if so desired.

Posted by: blablabla | February 16, 2010 4:26 PM | Report abuse

HAHAHA! Thetan, you rock! What a horrible person your neighbor was... "you're not going to park in front of MY house are you?" Seriously!????

Posted by: CyanSquirrel | February 16, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

I was visiting from NY this week when I tried to park in a space on E Street, SE in a residential neighborhood and was read the riot act about somebody's hard work and my lack of respect for the before mentioned hard work. I'm a a New Yorker. I understand the trials and tribulations of living in the city, but when you live in a metro area with street parking you have to understand that it is street parking and to those who post about "civility and the unwritten agreement" I would say move out to a suburban area and get a driveway or live in an apartment community with assigned parking. The idea is a kind of parking musical chairs that once all the people snowed in have dug out the spaces will even out. No one person can lay claim on a public street. With that mentality, squatting in front of bank vestibules and inside public buildings should be okay. Typical whiny mentality that goes screaming about the cruel injustice instead of getting off of one's butt to go fix the problem. To all those who beg to differ, I'd say wait for the government to fix all your problems and hunker down with a hot chocolate. Entitlement issues are the reason whining Americans is dragging the rest of us down with it.

Posted by: jcar1 | February 16, 2010 6:08 PM | Report abuse

I dug out a spot and a half like everyone else in the city, and then had to go out of town for the weekend. Should I expect that spot to be open when I get back because I put a chair there? After three days? Sure would have helped when I had to unload my car full of furniture, but that's just the way it is. There is no way I would ever think to reserve that spot for myself. That's quite a selfish way to go about life.
And if you really do need to leave your place of residence, I agree with someone who suggested looking into public transportation options. Unless you commute from two hours away, at which point you shouldn't be having these problems, there is probably a way to get where you are going.
There are HUNDREDS and HUNDREDS of public parking spots in DC that are filled in with snow and unused because there just happened not to be any cars in that spot when the snow was falling. If you can't stand it when people "steal" your spot, why not shovel all those out and claim them for yourself and your friends for generations to come? Maybe you could sell them. It's the new frontier!

Posted by: moncheechee | February 16, 2010 7:11 PM | Report abuse

Most of you are tripping. I am from DC, if you dig out your car, you have no right to the spot once you move your car. Now if you think that you are tough, let the person know that you are dissatisfied. And then ask him if he wants to dance with you. Don't be a punk and throw yoiur rock and hide. By the way I am dissabled and dug my car out and did not care if someone else got it. Most of you talking about doing this stuff may be a coward, anyway. LD

Posted by: lr_thinman | February 16, 2010 8:35 PM | Report abuse

The man across the street who keeps two cars, banged on my door one day last summer insisting I move my car from in front of his house, because he needed to wash his car. However, he has NOT shoveled out that third spot. There are jerks on all sides.

Posted by: ElRosas | February 17, 2010 6:43 AM | Report abuse

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