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Posted at 2:40 PM ET, 01/ 4/2011

Jail for twins who bribed DC cops

By Spencer S. Hsu
Washington Post editors

A federal judge sentenced twin brothers Larry and Garry Moody to 10 years and 21 months in prison, respectively, Tuesday for bribing two Metropolitan Police Department officers to derail a drug charge against Larry Moody.

The Moodys, 39, of Northeast Washington, pleaded guilty in October to bribing a public official, paying $8,000 in a videotaped FBI sting operation at a Hooters restaurant at Gallery Place in May 2009. Larry Moody also pleaded guilty to possession with intent to distribute heroin near a school, Tyler Elementary School.

U.S. District Judge Richard W. Roberts of the District allowed Garry Moody to serve the remainder of his sentence in a halfway house until his expected release in April or May, with credit for time served. Larry Moody -- whose longer sentence reflected five past convictions, including three drug crimes -- likely would have faced only 14 to 20 months based on his underlying drug case in D.C. Superior Court.

"You two committed an act of raw corruption," Roberts said. "This system is stronger than both of you. ... Fortunately for you, it will respond to you with justice, not injustice."

Both men faced up to 15 years in prison for the bribery charge, and Larry Moody a 40-year sentence for the drug charge, following his Feb. 12, 2009 arrest in a heroin sale in the 1200 block of I Street SE. The brothers later approached two MPD officers about a bribe, who contacted the FBI.

After calling Larry Moody a "hustler... pushing poison onto the streets," Roberts said, "Both of you can do better for yourselves, and for your children."

By Spencer S. Hsu  | January 4, 2011; 2:40 PM ET
Categories:  From the Courthouse, Narcotics, Spencer S. Hsu, The District  
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Comments

You give a Congressman $8,000 dollars for a favor, and it's a totally legal "campaign contribution."

You give a cop $8,000 to rent his uniform, badge, weapon, and authority: that's just "off-duty employment."

And the cop's buddy who flashes a card to get out of a traffic ticket, that's un-ironically called "professional courtesy."

I'm glad we prosecuted this particular case of bribery, but it's disheartening how much more corruption has not only been legalized, but has in fact become an unquestioned part of our civic landscape.

Posted by: vfr2dca | January 4, 2011 9:58 PM | Report abuse

You give a Congressman $8,000 dollars for a favor, and it's a totally legal "campaign contribution."

You give a cop $8,000 to rent his uniform, badge, weapon, and authority: that's just "off-duty employment."

And the cop's buddy who flashes a card to get out of a traffic ticket, that's un-ironically called "professional courtesy."

I'm glad we prosecuted this particular case of bribery, but it's disheartening how much more corruption has not only been legalized, but has in fact become an unquestioned part of our civic landscape.

Posted by: vfr2dca | January 4, 2011 9:58 PM | Report abuse

______________________________

vfcr2dca 2 THUMBS UP!!!!!!!!

Posted by: awfulexcuse1 | January 5, 2011 7:09 AM | Report abuse

On the other hand, the majority of the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that it is perfectly fine for corporations to donate as much money as they want to get someone they like elected and someone they don't like defeated, and in a different case four of those five declared that it is not fair to question the impartiality of a judge whose election has been bought and paid for by one of the litigants in a case.

So much for "equal justice under law."

Posted by: edallan | January 5, 2011 8:17 AM | Report abuse

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