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Leesburg runaways turn selves in to police

Three Leesburg girls who had been missing for five days turned themselves in to police early Tuesday at a grocery store, authorities said. They were not harmed and appeared healthy.

Police said they were not abducted or coerced to leave their parents.

The teen runaways -- Nathaly Flores, Allison Marroquin and Jocelyn Perdomo -- were at the Safeway at Countryside Shopping in Sterling when they approached a deputy and said they were ready to go home.

The girls, ages 13 and 14, were last seen outside of Smart's Mill Middle School, where they were dropped off Wednesday morning but did not attend classes that day.

The teens would not tell police where they had been, said Leesburg police spokesman Chris Jones.
"They were not very cooperative," Jones said. "They would not give details where they were or who they were staying with."

But Jones said the investigation is now closed.

-- Allison Klein

By Allison Klein  |  January 12, 2010; 12:15 PM ET
Categories:  Allison Klein , Loudoun , Updates  
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Comments

Why is this news?

Posted by: Nemo24601 | January 12, 2010 1:01 PM | Report abuse

How much did the county and state spend trying to locate these three anchor babies?

Posted by: postisarag | January 12, 2010 1:10 PM | Report abuse

They're lucky a pimp didn't abduct them.

Posted by: uncivil | January 12, 2010 1:12 PM | Report abuse

It's news because these selfish children wasted community resources, brought who knows what anxiety to their parents, and will open the eyes of other parents. I'm glad they're safe, but some action needs to brought against them.

Posted by: jckdoors | January 12, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

I'd like to make a home movie on what they did while they were away -

Posted by: reesemichael | January 12, 2010 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Yes, what they did was selfish. But something is probably wrong in their home situations. Were these kids wanted in the first place? People need to really look at their lives and their motivations before bringing another human into their homes and communities.
The selfishness may have started with the parents.

Posted by: catbird500 | January 12, 2010 2:38 PM | Report abuse

Some teenage girls are dumb. Who knew?

Posted by: lauther266 | January 12, 2010 3:27 PM | Report abuse

This story would be a lot more interesting if these girls actually "turned themselves into" police. More likely that they turned themselves in. Better yet, just say surrendered. They did not magically transform themselves into police officer, but that's what it sounds like. Do they not teach grammar in school these days? Or have they just fired all the copy editors?

Posted by: polyester | January 12, 2010 3:58 PM | Report abuse

It's news because these selfish children wasted community resources, brought who knows what anxiety to their parents, and will open the eyes of other parents. I'm glad they're safe, but some action needs to brought against them.

Posted by: jckdoors | January 12, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Kids have ran away for the past 100 years. What do you suggest Waterboarding them. There's always some jack @zz looking for retribution.

Posted by: askgees | January 12, 2010 4:40 PM | Report abuse

Whether or not they discuss sooner or later....in the long run they will wish they had. But don't sleep just yet one of them is bound to tell a girlfriend.

Posted by: chamellnash | January 12, 2010 4:41 PM | Report abuse

1) Glad they resurfaced alive and well.

2) I wonder what their motivations for leaving were. National studies have shown that the majority of runaways leave the home because they are being physically, sexually, or verbally abused. It doesn't matter what neighborhood the kids are from or what the socioeconomic status of their parents is -- this stuff happens everywhere. Even though the police spokesman says the "investigation is now closed," I hope someone at least looks into their home life to make sure everything is okay and that the girls really are safe now.

Posted by: muddiboots | January 12, 2010 5:25 PM | Report abuse

what does it mean if someone is an anchor baby??
is that some type of racist comment

Posted by: juancho380 | January 12, 2010 6:33 PM | Report abuse

The police should make tham do community service, what a waste of the police time.

Posted by: nativeva1 | January 12, 2010 6:39 PM | Report abuse

Muddiboots, thanks for the informed comment. It's very refreshing among all those from people who want to take draconian action with no knowledge of the circumstances of the girls' lives--not to mention the egregious ethnic slurs.

Posted by: cmckeonjr | January 12, 2010 7:31 PM | Report abuse

anchor baby probably relates to a misconception that illegal immigrants who have babies here some how gain immigration status through that act alone. they do not. USCIS (formerly ins) will deport people even if they have a baby born here. they just have to catch them, which they often do not. the use of the term probably means the person is unhappy that illegal immigrants can have children that are citizens and use up the resources provided by, i assume, second, third and fourth generation americans.

Posted by: good1 | January 12, 2010 9:07 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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