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Remembering the Million Man March

Thirteen years after African American men from across the country gathered at the U.S. Capitol for the Million Man March, community leaders, neighborhood groups and marching bands paraded through Southeast Washington to keep the spirit of the historic event alive.

"We have to let people know that we can't forget the work that our ancestors started before the march and the commitments the men made during the march," said Ron Moton, co-founder of the Peace-a-holics, just before the parade began at the corner of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Avenue.

Members of the Ballou High School Band tried to make a musical point to the Dunbar High School band that they own the streets east of the Anacostia River, but in the end both groups and hundreds of high school students enjoyed marching instead of being in class for much of the day.

Tyrone C. Parker, executive director of the Alliance of Concerned Men, said that he was glad to see so many young people, because "The spirit of our youth is the spirit of our community."

Kwaco Atiba, with the Concerned Parents of Petworth, said he hopes the march will make a difference with young people.

"Our youth today need a spirit of atonement."

The marched concluded with a rally in the parking lot of the Union Temple Baptist Church, where various speakers addressed the crowd on a day when many men reflected on an event 13 years ago when Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan had a warm sea of men to raise their right hand and pledge to be better fathers, husbands and community leaders.

Moton said one of the ways that his group is trying to honor that pledge is by registering some of the city's 60,000 ex-offenders to vote in the upcoming presidential election on Nov. 4th.

"Our ancestors, black and white, died so that we could get the right to vote," Moton said. "It is time for us to demand justice and equality for all people."

Tyrone C. Parker, executive director of the Alliance of Concerned Men, said that he was glad to see so many young people because "The spirit of our youth is the spirit of our community," but Kwaco Atiba, with the Concerned Parents of Petworth, said he hopes that the march will make a difference with the youth. "Our youth today need a spirit of atonement."

The marched concluded with a rally in the parking lot of the Union Temple Baptist Church where various speakers addressed the crowd on a day when many men reflected on an event 13 years ago when Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan had a warm sea of men to raise their right hand and pledged to be better fathers, husbands and leaders in their community.

Moton said one of the ways that his group is trying to honor that pledge that was made on that day is by registering some of the city's 60,000 ex-offenders to vote in the upcoming Presidential election on Nov. 4th.

"Our ancestors, black and white, died so that we could get the right to vote," Moton said. . "It is time for us to demand justice and equality for all people."


By Hamil Harris  |  October 16, 2008; 2:14 PM ET
 
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Comments

Ron Moten is to be commended for his ardent and focused activism. The Peacaholics continue to do BIG THANGS...

Posted by: Ntlekt | October 16, 2008 8:37 PM | Report abuse

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