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Council Okays Five-Cent Tax on Paper, Plastic Shopping Bags

The D.C. Council voted unanimously today to assess a 5-cent tax on paper and plastic bags to try to discourage their use, putting the District at the forefront of efforts nationwide to promote reusable shopping bags.

The proposal, which must be voted on again later this month before it becomes law, is designed to limit pollution into the Anacostia River and its tributaries. A recent environmental study shows that nearly 50 percent of the trash in the river's tributaries comes from plastic bags.

The tax would apply to grocery stores, pharmacies and other food-service providers.

Read the full article.

By Christopher Dean Hopkins  |  June 2, 2009; 3:11 PM ET
Categories:  D.C. Council  
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Comments

I'm officially shopping in Maryland where I can get my items bagged for free. I own a house in the District and feel like I already give the city too much money!!!!

Posted by: boo2 | June 2, 2009 3:41 PM | Report abuse

Right Boo2! So with the cost of gas, you won't just get a reuable bag and be done with it? You would rather drive all the way to Maryland. Very smart. I wonder how long that will last.

Posted by: LeeZure | June 2, 2009 3:50 PM | Report abuse

reusable

Posted by: LeeZure | June 2, 2009 3:51 PM | Report abuse

LeeZure, i'm on the DC/MD line... its equal distance, but thanks for your concern!

Posted by: boo2 | June 2, 2009 3:53 PM | Report abuse

Did the Council ever consider that people might bring their own plastic and paper bags TO the store for their groceries??

Even Whole Foods provides recyclable paper bags which I then reuse as liners for my bedroom and bathroom trash cans.

Posted by: gonzo03 | June 3, 2009 8:41 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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