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At Dorothy Height viewing, Fenty, feminist leaders offer plaudits

D.C. Mayor Adrian M. Fenty was among the political figures who came to the headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women this morning to pay their final respects to Dorothy Irene Height. Her body has now been taken to Howard University, where she is being remembered by sisters of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

"Dr. Height was one of the original Civil Rights pioneers," Fenty said after leaving the private viewing. "She has accomplished so much in her life. She is a treasure to the country, but in many ways she is a Washingtonian, being right there in the 600 block of Pennsylvania Avenue for so many years. We just want to value her life, her accomplishments and to let her family know how much we miss her here in Washington."

In addition to taking part in the "Omega Omega," service, many of Heights "sorors," came to the viewing of Height Tuesday night where people like Air Force Brigadier General and pilot Stayce Harris said Height inspired her to blaze her own historic trail.

"She was a sorority sister. She was a Civil Rights 'she-ro'," Harris said. "It is because of her that I am able to be here today representing not just African Americans or African American women but women in general," said Harris, who is stationed at the Pentagon as one of the leaders of the U.S. Africa Command said.

A steady stream of people, black and white, paid their final respects Height that included national leaders, ordinary people and leaders of many movements in this country.

Eleanor Smeal, former president of the National Organization for Women, said "Dr. Height was a leader in the feminist movement," and Kim Gandy, another past president of the National Organization for Women, said, "Dr. Height always said she was born a feminist, and she always encouraged women to work for women's rights along with Civil Rights and social justice issues. She was always there whenever we called on her."

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-- Hamil R. Harris

By Christopher Dean Hopkins  |  April 28, 2010; 2:58 PM ET
Categories:  Hamil R. Harris , Mayor Fenty  
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Comments

Dr. Height was one of the original Civil Rights pioneers," Fenty said after leaving the private viewing. "She has accomplished so much in her life. She is a treasure to the country, but in many ways she is a Washingtonian, being right there in the 600 block of Pennsylvania Avenue for so many years. We just want to value her life, her accomplishments and to let her family know how much we miss her here in Washington."

Too bad Mayor Fenty didn't take all of these platitudes into account when he refused to meet with her and Maya Angelou, before Dr. Dorothy I. Height was hospitalized.

Posted by: KwameFan | April 29, 2010 9:52 AM | Report abuse

Co-sign Kwamefan! Did Gestapo Fenty even issue a statement apologizing for not meeting these two great women? Oh I guess a tweet was supposed to be good enough.

He's sorry

Posted by: thelildiva4u | April 29, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

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