Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

E-mail Bill | RSS Feed | In-depth coverage: Education Page | Follow The Post's education coverage: Twitter | Facebook

Student injured by chair-wielding sub

A seventh grader at Maya Angelou Public Charter School suffered a fractured ankle last week when a substitute teacher allegedly threw a chair at him during PE class. Lucretia Murphy, executive director of the See Forever Foundation, which operates the school, confirmed the incident, first reported Monday evening by Fox 5 news.

"There was a definite incident in which a substitute teacher did shove a chair toward a child," Murphy said. "That's completely inappropriate, so the substitute has been banned from the building."

Murphy declined to release the name of the teacher, who she said had worked at the school before without incident. She said a police investigation was underway.

According to the Fox 5 report, the-13-year-old student was shooting foul shots when the sub accused him of throwing jellybeans at him. As he denied it, the student said, the teacher picked up a chair.

"He grabbed it with two hands and threw it towards my way and I tried jumping over the chair and it hit the side of my ankle," he said. Video shows the ankle in a cast.

Follow D.C. Schools Insider every day at washingtonpost.com/dcschools.
And for admissions advice, college news and links to campus papers,
please check out our new Higher Education page at washingtonpost.com/higher-ed.
Bookmark it!

By Bill Turque  |  May 18, 2010; 4:53 PM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: DCPS says closed schools save $17 million
Next: Assault at Hearst under investigation

Comments

who was the teacher, Bob Knight

Posted by: plantlady1 | May 18, 2010 7:58 PM | Report abuse

For this occasion I select the poem "Mama Welfare Roll" by Maya Angelou (a real poem, to my surprise). This poem is slightly modified to make it through the Post's comment-vuglarity detector.

----

Her arms semaphore fat triangles,
Pudgy hands bunched on layered hips
Where bones idle under years of fatback
And lima beans.
Her jowls shiver in accusation
Of crimes clich├ęd by
Repetition. Her children, strangers
To childhood's toys, play
Best the games of darkened doorways,
Rooftop tag, and know the slick feel of
Other people's property.

Too fat to wh-ore,
Too mad to work,
Searches her dreams for the
Lucky sign and walks bare-handed
Into a den of bureaucrats for
Her portion.
'They don't give me welfare.
I take it.'

Posted by: RepealObamacareNow | May 18, 2010 8:13 PM | Report abuse

Bobby Knight throws chairs at referees. I would like him to teach in the DCPS. Look out future spouses of former NBA players! Make a bad call; I dare ya!

Posted by: AGAAIA | May 19, 2010 5:00 AM | Report abuse

You don't break an ankle by banging it into a chair. Maybe the child's parents are looking for a payout from the school system?

Posted by: strohminator | May 19, 2010 6:25 AM | Report abuse

I'm sure this child is just a little angel. Where's the slip and fall lawyer around the corner?

Posted by: FiatBooks | May 19, 2010 9:22 AM | Report abuse

I was walking by a school just the other day in NE and the some kids was outside giving a teacher a hard time while the other kids where laughing and finding everything funny. I could see the look on the teachers face, like not another day and he was trying to stay calm. That's why I could not teach school because I am one of those parents who will wrap my hands around my kids neck, and I don't have the patience for this uneducated fools or there parents. We are losing good teachers because a lot of this kids are coming to school to play around and there parents are looking for $$$$$ instead of correcting their kids behavior. Hopefully he will find something that he is good at, teaching school is not for everyone especially in this day and time.

Posted by: shadon1 | May 19, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Today's youth are just a different breed and believe it or not, so are today's parents. I remember in the 80's and 90's when I was coming up, there were parents who did not hesitate to discipline their children (including my own), be it at home or at school and sometimes in FRONT of the class. I remember this one dude when I was in 6ht grade...his father came up to the school because the teacher was fed up with him. I remember his father beat him out in the hallway with this huge wrestler belt...LOL The teacher never had another problem out of him after that.

Today's parents don't take the time anymore to discipline their kids which leaves the teachers feeling like SOMEBODY has to teach them a lesson. It's a sad case really. The Gov't messed us all up now that the police can be called and you can be locked up for disciplining your own child in public.

Posted by: Ms511 | May 19, 2010 10:16 AM | Report abuse

It's a shame that so many tyrants are running around this city, that when a good kid is victimized he's further insulted by ignorance. Place the blame where it belongs on the "grown man" who the "zero tolerance" school employed. Teachers are supposed to be the example. What kind of poor excuse for a man stoops so low to throw a chair at a child? You blame the children, but look at the adults who are supposed to be teaching them better. There was no excuse for a grown man that had not been assaulted or faced no threat of harm, to pick a chair and throw it. Parents send their children to school under the presumption that are are being educated in a safe environment, parents can't discipline there own kids without fear of CPS involvement, but when a teacher hurls a chair at a child the kid had it coming? Bottom line some hot headed, poor excuse for a man, bullied a kid, just like he no doubtly beats and bullies his women/kids. And some idiot thinks that these parents are looking for a payday. I hope you or your children never know what damage a hurling chair may cause. Don't make stupid comments condoning or defending acts of violence against a child. It's never alright.

Posted by: tashanapper | May 19, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

@ Tashanapper....I'm not saying the kid had it coming. I don't know if the kid was a good kid or not. I'm generally speaking of the state of parents vs kids vs teachers in today's society. Yes the teacher was unprofessional in his action..no question about that.

Posted by: Ms511 | May 19, 2010 10:45 AM | Report abuse

Ms511, do you really think a parent hitting his child with a huge belt is something to laugh at? I agree that some parents do a very poor job of teaching their children right and wrong. I don't think that a teacher who resorts to throwing a piece of furniture at a student is an acceptable form of discipline. What precisely is the student supposed to learn? That when you're ticked off you resort to physical force?

Posted by: sanderling5 | May 19, 2010 10:59 AM | Report abuse

sanderling5...we all laugh about that incident now that we're grown and look back on it, including the person it happened to. And again, I'm not saying the teacher took the right course of action by hurling a chair at a child. My point was that teachers used to call parents when there was a problem. But it seems these days calling the parents doesn't solve the problem and even the parents become a problem.

Posted by: Ms511 | May 19, 2010 11:39 AM | Report abuse

It's a shame that so many tyrants are running around this city, that when a good kid is victimized he's further insulted by ignorance. Place the blame where it belongs on the "grown man" who the "zero tolerance" school employed. Teachers are supposed to be the example. What kind of poor excuse for a man stoops so low to throw a chair at a child? You blame the children, but look at the adults who are supposed to be teaching them better. There was no excuse for a grown man that had not been assaulted or faced no threat of harm, to pick a chair and throw it. Parents send their children to school under the presumption that are are being educated in a safe environment, parents can't discipline there own kids without fear of CPS involvement, but when a teacher hurls a chair at a child the kid had it coming? Bottom line some hot headed, poor excuse for a man, bullied a kid, just like he no doubtly beats and bullies his women/kids. And some idiot thinks that these parents are looking for a payday. I hope you or your children never know what damage a hurling chair may cause. Don't make stupid comments condoning or defending acts of violence against a child. It's never alright.

Posted by: tashanapper | May 19, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

___________________________

VERY well said tashanapper.

For anyone to excuse/accept/promote abuse toward a student, by a teacher, under ANY circumstances is clearly wrong.

Somebody is suppose to be the adult education professional, that is "suppose" to be trained to handle situations such as these to eliminate the possibility of volitale situations occurring.

Videos of a female teacher BEATING a student...

Stories of a male teacher throwing classroom furniture at a student...

Stories of teachers having physical relationships with students....

The list goes on...

And NOW reading that an alarming two-thirds of 3rd GRADERS in VA/MD are not reaching proficiency levels in reading by the end of third grade??!

I guess this is ALL the parents fault too??


None of this makes it any easier for teachers who are doing good work.

Posted by: TwoSons | May 19, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

If you can dodge a chair, you can dodge a ball!

Posted by: hisdudeness1 | May 19, 2010 1:11 PM | Report abuse

The means doesn't justify the actions of the adult in this situation. I saw the footage on the news and the father of the child still had respect for the school. The father was not on a tangent about the rights and wrongs of the public school system. It was stated that the incident was caught on video-tape, therefore the proof-positive aspect of this whole scenario can be justified.

@shadon1, may I ask, as you observed the incident of the disruptive students...did you ever think to intervene on the teacher's behalf? Was the look on the teacher's face troublesome...? What would have it cost $$$$ to just take your hands out of your pockets and just motion the students into doing the correct way of handling their situation.

If one wants to blame a past generation of people... then I find those who sit and wring their hands are just as useless as those who just want to wring student necks of the current generation.

Posted by: PowerandPride | May 19, 2010 2:31 PM | Report abuse

The sub threw a chair? Yeah, right!!! The parents are looking to make some money! This is very clear!!!
Today's youth is Horrible! I would never become a teacher!!!

Posted by: martinalandau | May 19, 2010 9:16 PM | Report abuse

@tashanapper:

When I was in 3rd grade, a PE teacher at Ludlow-Taylor ES stopped me in the hall as I was on my way to lunch. I had forgotten my lunch ticket and went back to my class to get it. The teacher confronted me and I told him why I was in the hallway during lunch time...at which point he did a very curious thing. He snatched my lunch ticket and ripped it up, in front of my face, dropping the pieces to the ground. When I bent down to pick the pieces, he grabbed me by my neck and forced me back to a standing position. After releasing me, he walked away like nothing had happened. This was 1980. I told my mom that day; she did nothing (why I cannot fathom).

Fast forward 6 years...I go to high school and guess who's coaching the track team? Of course, this teacher didn't remember me or the incident at the elementary school. There were probably too many similar incidents with other kids for him to remember an individual or an episode.

There is always a previous, unreported incident or a series of unreported, prior incidents that go undisclosed until that ONE snap blows everything out of the water.

@Ms511:
You're right. If you can't spank your children without fear that your neighbors will send CPS to your home, then what do you do when YOUR children grow up to mug/rob/rape/kill those same sanctimonious neighbors? Here's what you do...You spank the children now--so that you do not have to cry for them later, as a judge hands them a jail term.

@Strohminator and FiatBooks:
I moved from DC to what was supposed to be a better school system for my children's sake.

When my daughter was pinned against a bathroom wall by one student, while another student cut her hair, and a room full of onlookers cheered on the girl with the scissors, I was more concerned with my daughter's safety and the delinquents' discipline than a pay day. I could have cleaned out Arlington County's budget surplus that year...but not everyone is interested in winning the "my child got injured in school" lottery that you portray.

Posted by: alamero1 | May 20, 2010 3:36 PM | Report abuse

This happened to a substitute I know in a well-respected NoVa high school.

The substitute repeated the directions to a student and the student got into his face and said, "I don't have to listen to you. You're a ***king substitute."

I don't know if many are able to imagine the job of a sub. You're responsible for up to 120 new faces in one day in a high school. You're expected to implement plans, sometimes incomplete or without lists, while many students are driven to put themselves or you in danger.

I know the sub. should not have thrown the chair. I also know substitutes are human and students -- can be very very mean.

Posted by: bravobravo | May 20, 2010 8:28 PM | Report abuse

Welcome to the brave new world of charter schools.

This is the type of thing that happens when you have amateurs running public schools.

I saw a child being pulled down several flights of a stairwell by a charter school teacher who hadn't been trained on how to avoid corporeal punishment.

At another charter school where I worked, a new teacher was escorted out of the building in the middle of the school year after responding inappropriately during an incident in a charter middle school.

These were incidents involving well-meaning people who wanted to teach in DC but lacked training and experience. They worked for administrators who had the best of intentions, but had no idea how to run a public school.

Posted by: Nemessis | May 23, 2010 8:47 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company