Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

E-mail Bill | RSS Feed | In-depth coverage: Education Page | Follow The Post's education coverage: Twitter | Facebook

DCPS stories worth reading

In the daily torrent of education news and commentary, interesting work can easily get overlooked. I'll try to get in the habit of flagging DCPS-related pieces that I think are worth your time. I came across three today.

In Mother Jones, teacher Roger Garfield describes his rough first year at Youth Services Center, the alternative school for students in grades 7-12 who have been involved with the juvenile justice system and classified as wards of the state.

On his blog, AEI education scholar Rick Hess offers his take on the fate of education reform in the District should Chancellor Michelle A. Rhee decamp after the primary (This was also the topic of my piece in Tuesday's paper). Hess likens the work done by Rhee to an industrial drill bit, and says it can take more than one to break through such a resistant surface. When one wears down, another equally strong one is swapped into place. Hess wonders if a Gray administration will settle for a duller bit that slows progress.

New York Magazine's John Heilemann examines the powerful clash surrounding the new education documentary "Waiting for Superman, featuring Rhee and AFT president Randi Weingarten.

Follow D.C. Schools Insider every day at washingtonpost.com/dc- schools. And for admissions advice, college news and links to campus papers, please check out our new Higher Education page at washingtonpost.com/higher-ed. Bookmark it!

By Bill Turque  |  September 7, 2010; 4:50 PM ET
Categories:  Michelle Rhee  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Office of Campaign Finance clears Rhee
Next: Wilson students waiting for books

Comments

"Hess likens the work done by Rhee to an industrial drill bit, and says it can take more than one to break through such a resistant surface. When one wears down, another equally strong one is swapped into place. Hess wonders if a Gray administration will settle for a duller bit that slows progress."

The industrial drill bit analogy is an interesting one, particularly given the toughness of issues present in D.C.'s public schools.

There are several problems with industrial drill bits, even if they are mining for gold:
- they have no sensors, sensitivity, to see if they are kicking aside/missing diamonds,rubies,a vein of silver, water, etc. on their narrow path.
- there is no sense of feeling to take care of any collateral damage that may happen on the way down.

Toughness is undeniably needed in tough situations, but so is intelligence, vision, a sense of compassion, experience,
and thorough knowledge of issues both seen and unseen.

I dearly hope that whoever runs the DC schools from now on assembles an exemplary team that reflects the qualities listed above and then some.

The difficulties inherent in taking on the DC schools is a bit much for one poor drill bit.

Posted by: PLMichaelsArtist-at-Large | September 8, 2010 9:49 AM | Report abuse

I do hope Mr. Garfield continues to learn to teach and continues to grapple with his role as teacher. I don't think any of us need to read his still-developing reflections, mostly on "other" people (aka his students), and less on his own teaching. He could seriously revise his Mother Jones piece for the portfolio he will need as he pursues licensure. But by now, I think we've all read enough pieces like his.

Posted by: dcparent | September 8, 2010 10:22 PM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company