Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: dcsportsbog and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  E-mail alerts: Redskins and Sports  |  RSS

Who's Managing the Clocks?


Jonathan Newton - TWP

Trok Aikman: " I think Washington should use a timeout here and not let it go all the way down to the two-minute warning....This doesn't make any sense to me. They're burning a lot of time off this clock....To me, this makes no sense, running it down to two minutes."

And that's coming from a dude that's taken like 462 shots to the head.

The clock-botching really peeves me, because anything that's simple enough for me to understand while eating apples and cheese and watching the game with the sound turned off should be simple enough for a coaching staff with 93 members to figure out. Since the person I was watching the game with argued that this wasn't as simple as I was making it out to be, let's go to the play-by-play.

Actual events
2:44: First down, running play, no timeout
2:00: Two-minute warning, second down
1:51: Redskins final timeout, third down, running play
1:22: Punt

Logical events
2:44: First down, running play, Redskins final timeout
2:33 or 2:23 or 2:13: Second down, running play
2:00: Two-minute warning, Redskins final timeout, third down, running play
1:31 (est): Punt

That, of course, assumes that Green Bay ridiculously punts the ball with time left on the play clock again, but there's no way you can excuse forfeiting those nine seconds late in a game like that. I can't even think of a single situation in which this would have made sense. Help? (See also: FanHouse.)

Also, did you see when the camera showed Gregg Williams loudly speaking with Gibbs just before halftime? "If we get a first down, let it run down" he appeared to say. The offense has the ball, and the defensive coordinator is instructing the head coach on clock management? Help?

By Dan Steinberg  |  October 15, 2007; 10:16 AM ET
Categories:  Redskins  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Jerry Rice Dancing Soulja Boy
Next: Terps Dance Too!

Comments

The skins clearly need some help with clock management. Far worse was the end of the giants game, when they rushed a fourth down play even though they could take the full 40 seconds left in the game. Why run it with 25 seconds left? They get off a normal play in 40 second with the playclock. Make that the last play of the game.

Posted by: ah | October 15, 2007 10:42 AM | Report abuse

I would've thought Campbell was pretty astute to manage this kind of stuff, but apparently the coaches feel better their style.

Posted by: ScottVanPeltStyle.com | October 15, 2007 11:03 AM | Report abuse

What kind of cheese and what kind of apples? Sounds like a great way to watch the game.

Posted by: alexandriamom | October 15, 2007 11:39 AM | Report abuse

We thought the t-word was making its Washington Post debut. :(

Posted by: Bobtimist | October 15, 2007 11:54 AM | Report abuse

Ok, I posted this on Skins insider, but I'm curious to know if the coaches addressed this issue in relation to time-outs:

Why Gibbs did not challenge the spot of that 3rd down play to Cooley late in the game. The first down line was around the 30, Cooley seemed to catch the ball right on the line, but got pushed back. Forward progress should have spotted it at the 30, but then Cooley planted his feet and dove forward again right to the marker. The official marked him down where he planted his feet. Replays clearly showed he was in bounds. I thought we should have challenged, at best we would have gotten a first down, at worst instead of 4th and 2 it would have been 4th and inches. Challenging would have cost us a time out, had we lost the challenge, but we still took a time-out before the 4th down, so it made no sense not to challenge it. We get that spot, and we are in field goal position or close to it.

Posted by: Ted | October 15, 2007 1:22 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company