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Nats Beer Story Grows Sadder


Capitol City's sad absence from Nats Park actually contained a bit of intrigue, as detailed this week by colleague Greg Kitsock in the Food Section. There were at one time plans for Cap City to control 16 taps in the stadium, including eight in a left-field beer garden, Kitsock writes. And then?

The deal foundered, according to [head brewer Mike] McCarthy and Capitol City regional manager Mark Pearson, because Miller Brewing Co. -- a major sponsor of the Nationals -- objected to signs or banners bearing the Capitol City name.

Deprived of the opportunity to advertise, Capitol City management decided the venture wasn't worth it.

After the plan fell through, Silver offered Capitol City the opportunity to run a food stand on ground level behind center field. But the kiosk, said Capitol City President David von Storch, would have been accessible to only about 5,000 of the nearly 42,000 seats in the stadium -- and he was more interested in selling beer than food.

Also in the story, an e-mail buddy of mine, Tom Cizauskas, from Clipper City Brewing, says he attempted to meet with Centerplate and was brushed off.

There appear to be conflicting stories about how this all went down, with the Miller manager telling a different tale. At the risk of being obsessive, I'd like to say the D.C. ballpark crowd includes scads of beer enthusiasts who would rather drink local ales than imported pilseners, and that the two sides should just find a way to make it work. But in truth, we should all probably just go to brewpubs to drink good beer, since in those sanctuaries the beer is cheaper, there's a greater likelihood of getting spinach-artichoke dip, and there's a much smaller chance of seeing Paul Lo Duca ground into a game-ending double play.

By Dan Steinberg  |  April 11, 2008; 4:24 PM ET
Categories:  Nats  
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Comments

"...and there's a much smaller chance of seeing Paul Lo Duca ground into a game-ending double play."

Well ok, true. But...ouch. On so many levels.

Posted by: NatsFanatics.com | April 11, 2008 4:45 PM | Report abuse

The effort is there. Went to the game tonight and there were a million concessions.

http://washingtonwizard.blogspot.com/

Posted by: Anonymous | April 11, 2008 11:34 PM | Report abuse

Am I the only one who thinks Cap City beer sucks?

Posted by: Matt Brown | April 13, 2008 3:52 PM | Report abuse

Matt, you are not alone. Dominion trumps Crap City by far.

Posted by: You are not the only one | April 14, 2008 9:21 AM | Report abuse

Forget Cap City, I want Dogfish. It's regional enough.

Posted by: Unsilent Majority | April 14, 2008 9:25 AM | Report abuse

Dogfish Head is for losers.

Posted by: Anonymous | April 14, 2008 9:31 AM | Report abuse

Cap City does suck, no loss there.

Posted by: dhart | April 14, 2008 10:37 AM | Report abuse

Not only is Cap City's beer terrible, I have had the two worst bar service experiences of my life at the one by Union Station.

Dogfish, Dogfish, Dogfish. 1000 times better in all areas.

Posted by: Paul | April 14, 2008 11:40 AM | Report abuse

Dogfish Head, Cap City, Dominion, Clipper City - it's all good when the alternatives are Bud light, Coors light and Miller lite!

Personally, I'd prefer Dominion or Cap City, but I see others don't think so. I'd take any of the locals over the nationals though.

Posted by: Rob | April 14, 2008 12:24 PM | Report abuse

To report what I said on Goff's blog: I wish they would offer Hedonism Red Ale from Legacy Brewing in Pennsylvania, if only because of the packaging:

http://www.packagedesignmag.com/issues/2006.05/spotlight.food.1.shtml

Posted by: tri-village | April 14, 2008 5:35 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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