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Santana Moss's Spinning Football


Spins football. (By Manuel Balce Ceneta - AP)


Surely you've noticed that Santana Moss spins the football at least once a game following a big catch, and often more than that. I know I've quoted him before on his spinning footballs, but I can't remember when that was, and like they say, what happened last year doesn't count.

Oh, plus Clinton Portis has been spinning footballs lately. On Sunday after his touchdown, he spun the ball, squatted down, and waited for the ball to fall over before moving on to the sideline. He said he was waiting for the ball to stop.

"Hit my stop watch," he said, making a tweeting noise.

The origins of the spin, though, are in some question.

"I've been doing it forever," Moss said. "I've been doing it since Miami. They had made me stop in college, because I did it one game against Cincinnati on the turf and it spun for like, man, I'm talking about minutes. And next time when the season start and the officials come out and tell you what you can't do for this year, I was the guy they was telling, 'Hey, you can't do this.' I've been doing it since high school, I've been doing it since Pop Warner. Everybody do it now."

Yeah, everybody. Like Portis.

"I was spinning the ball before Santana," Portis said. "Santana spin the ball and it stay spinning for like.......that's gonna get us an excessive celebration penalty."

"I might not get no credit for it, but I'm not the one that wants credit for it," Moss said. "It's just who looks the best when they do it. See, I don't have to get down there, I don't have to make it spin, I can just throw it out there and it's gonna spin....See, mine is a little different man. You've just got to watch it. I don't even hold it like [a top], I hold it from the side. I just flick it out. You know what I'm saying? I could sit on my butt. You should see when I sit on my butt and spin it. I've got plenty of ways I can do it. I can stand on my head and spin it."

"No, I'm messing with you," he finally said, but I would actually like to see him standing on his head and spinning a football.

By Dan Steinberg  |  October 22, 2008; 3:38 PM ET
Categories:  Redskins  
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Next: Jim Zorn's Symphonic Masterpiece

Comments

Jason Taylor goes back to the drawing board on his spin move.

Posted by: StetSports.com | October 22, 2008 4:32 PM | Report abuse

They spinnin *****, they spinnin!

Posted by: Chris Rock | October 22, 2008 4:50 PM | Report abuse

While all these xtra behind the scenes information is rewarding to fans I think it kind of takes away the focus of playing the game. The week before the Rams in Skins were on ESPN dissecting plays, doing every interview and we came out flat...let's let them focus on balling so we can get that ring come Jan.

Posted by: Mike | October 22, 2008 4:55 PM | Report abuse

Right, because when Portis starting dressing up like Dolemite Jenkins, that really ruined 2005.

Dan's Bog has quickly become the best reading I've found regarding the Skins in years. Heavens forbid he show that the players (and Zorn!) are interesting people. Cuz you know if Cheeseboy ain't asking these questions, everybody's going to use all that extra free time just to study tape. *sigh* It's cool that Dan's found a way to be a Homer without pretending to be a football analyst.

Posted by: WorstSeat | October 22, 2008 7:44 PM | Report abuse

The first time I remember seeing someone spin the ball was in 1988 during Super Bowl XXII when Timmy Smith spun the ball and danced after a TD. That puts Santana at about 9 years old. Depending on when he started Pop Warner, He may truly be the original ball spinner.

Posted by: beggarsandthieves | October 22, 2008 9:14 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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