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Nationals Timekeeping Fail


(Photo courtesy of Lori Ducharme.)


Over the past week, I've now gotten three different reports of Nationals Timekeeping Fail, from three different readers, with three different descriptions of the failing times. One person said the scoreboard's large Curly W clock was one hour off. One person said it was 10 minutes off. And then there was reader Lori, who just sent me this photo, with this message:

Just so you know, yesterday they tried to fix the clock at Nationals Park. When I arrived at the game, the analog clock was its customary 10 minutes behind the digital clock. Sometime before first pitch, they attempted to reset it, and either got distracted or just can't tell time using an analog clock. It not sits exactly four hours behind EDT. It kept perfect Anchorage time throughout yesterday's game. Clock FAIL.

Indeed. Although I suppose the clock is timed perfectly so that, even as each loss is concluded, you can tell yourself that somewhere, the first pitch is still just a few minutes away.

(Noted, as always: I believe the Nationals will succeed wildly in the near future, and I will jump on the bandwagon with all four limbs when that happens. Growing pains, is all.)

(Previously: Nationals Uniform Fail, Nationals Bobblehead Fail, Nationals Kosher Fail, Nationals Fireworks Fail.)

By Dan Steinberg  |  June 8, 2009; 4:30 PM ET
Categories:  Nats  
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Comments

Noticed the same thing on Saturday night. Analog clock started out 20 minutes behind, ended up about 40 behind. But given we won that game 7-1, it would have been fine to live through the last 40 minutes of it again.

Posted by: dcborn61 | June 8, 2009 4:39 PM | Report abuse

Oh, great. Another reason for the Lerners to withhold the rent money...

Posted by: EdTheRed | June 8, 2009 5:38 PM | Report abuse

How much longer are the Nationals going to be in existence? This franchise is a bigger laughingstock than the Lions in Detroit!

Posted by: Randy_Hawkins | June 8, 2009 7:02 PM | Report abuse

This is brilliance from the Lerners. Come for the clock... leave thinking you haven't wasted hours of your life.

Posted by: sitruc | June 9, 2009 12:49 AM | Report abuse

Maybe they could have a turn-back-the-clock promotion and wear throwback DC unis.

Posted by: natsfan1a1 | June 9, 2009 5:35 AM | Report abuse

Heck, even the Nats' TV announcers are cracking jokes about the clock, which has been like this since at least late spring last year. Just one more symbol of organizational ineptitude.

Is it somehow impossible to simply manually fix the hands on the clock before each homestand begins?

Posted by: VPaterno | June 9, 2009 9:47 AM | Report abuse

Maybe this is all a ploy to get the media talking about the team. After all even bad news is news??? Nah, no one's that stupid... right?

Next: contract, fail: Maybe they'll accidentally sign Strasberg to a $50 billion contract, "m" and "b" are close on the keyboard, oops!!! Hilarity will ensue. Tears will be shed.

Posted by: law3 | June 9, 2009 10:03 AM | Report abuse

Steins, you link all the fails at the bottom, but don't forget Zimmerman(n) bat fail.

Posted by: sirbobalew | June 10, 2009 10:09 AM | Report abuse

The clock was correct all night last night - just the _weather_ sucked. That, and the fact that they closed the 200s bars at 11:00... -JW

Posted by: JWJr | June 11, 2009 12:52 PM | Report abuse

If you look closely at the clock, it is correct if you look in the mirror!!!

The person resetting the "W" clock was looking at it from the wrong side - funny.

Posted by: anyone1 | June 11, 2009 1:39 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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