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John Wall picks No. 2

After talking approvingly of Nos. 3 and 15, John Wall switched things up and announced on Twitter that he'll be wearing No. 2 this season Wednesday evening. I guess it's 1 plus 1, which might refer to his previous uniform number of 11, which is retired in honor of Elvin Hayes.

I've gotten into trouble with this resource in the past, but here -- via the Wizards' media guide -- is the list of past players who've worn No. 2 in franchise history. (Some of these players wore multiple numbers during their time here.)

Steve Blake
Walter Budko
Buck Johnson
Shaun Livingston
Mitch Richmond
Byron Russell
God Shammgod
DeShawn Stevenson
Ennis Whatley
Mike Wilson
Chris Webber

This also forms the uniform numbers of D.C.'s current quartet of stars in a thoroughly unrecognizable pattern: 2, 5, 8, 37. Someone find the logic.

Thoughts?

By Dan Steinberg  |  June 30, 2010; 6:54 PM ET
Categories:  Wizards  
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Comments

No

Posted by: Salinas1 | June 30, 2010 7:16 PM | Report abuse

Why do you "get in trouble" for using the Wiz media guide? Like they withhold your allowance and make you wash extra dishes, or what?

Posted by: Urnesto | June 30, 2010 7:20 PM | Report abuse

@Urnesto, I wrote in today's paper that Earl Monroe wore 10 and 15 with the Bullets, based on that list in the media guide. But two people emailed me very convincingly this morning, saying that Monroe wore 10 and 33 (briefly) in Washington, but never 15. So I'm not sure how accurate the list is.

Haven't been able to confirm this, either.

Posted by: DanSteinberg1 | June 30, 2010 7:25 PM | Report abuse

EG PLEASE!!! Dont be stupid enough to trade Gilbert. He will play with a boulder on his should and that can mean nothing but good things for the Wiz. Don't forget that he is still one of the best. Check this out!!:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rj7_5wutcak

Posted by: sirmixx01 | June 30, 2010 7:29 PM | Report abuse

They're all prime numbers except for the one that isn't. Maybe 8 is a prime in Russian?

Posted by: Matt_Terl | June 30, 2010 8:25 PM | Report abuse

You had to use DanSteinberg1 on your own blog?

Posted by: tundey | June 30, 2010 8:26 PM | Report abuse

Chris Webber wore number 4

Posted by: merajc86 | June 30, 2010 8:49 PM | Report abuse

he's number 1, second to none. he wont be outdone.

I watched too many Ford commercials as a kid.

Posted by: spotter | June 30, 2010 8:59 PM | Report abuse

Thank you for the God Shammgod reference. Can I get a Jim McIlvaine shout out next?

Posted by: ILikeTurtles | June 30, 2010 9:02 PM | Report abuse

Really, this is all you got? You are getting to be like Wilbon.

Posted by: KDSmallJr | June 30, 2010 9:19 PM | Report abuse

The first three are fibonacci numbers...get Strasburg to switch to 34.

Posted by: ato3 | June 30, 2010 10:15 PM | Report abuse

1) The average of the four numbers. 2+5+8+37=52, 52/4 = unlucky 13. A tribute to our unluckily average performance of late.

2) Alternatively, 2*5*8*37=2960. Add to that the sum of the years since the Redskins last won a Super Bowl (18) and the number of wins they got this year (4). Divide that by XM Fox Sports Radio's DC channel (142) and you get 21. A tribute to ST.

3) The leading theory: 2+5+8+37+(the number of blog posts you are yet to write about Haynesworth) = infinity. The sky is the limit for DC sports.

Posted by: GreatWallofChinatown | July 1, 2010 9:42 AM | Report abuse

Funny, just a few years ago, it was something like:

0, 26...and that was it.

Posted by: brian71490 | July 1, 2010 10:29 AM | Report abuse

@merajc86 - Webber wore #2 when he first came to the team. Scotty Skiles already had #4.

Clearly the answer is that there is a difference of 3 between 2 and 5 and between 5 and 8. 3 is the first number in Strasburg's jersey. Then, to get the 7, you add together the numbers of the other two Americans in the quartet (in these days of spies, we don't include the Russian's number).

Posted by: gkronenberg | July 1, 2010 10:33 AM | Report abuse

Here's my take on the logistical aspect of those numbers Dan.

For every 2 good players we get,

we let go of 5 players that help other teams do good are win championships.

We get back back through trades or drafts 8 players who border line being bums, mediocrity or oblivious to the scheme of Wizards losing ways and as a result

there are 37 transactions that take place before the trade deadline that results in a major shake-up of the Wizards organization.

lol...

Posted by: cbmuzik | July 1, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

Good...he'll bring more class to that number than Stevenson ever did.

Posted by: kahlua87 | July 1, 2010 12:38 PM | Report abuse

There was a pathetic but funny story in the Detroit News a few years ago about how Ben Wallace was given #30 for the Wizards:
_____
"When I was coming in, Rasheed (Wallace) was going out," Wallace said. "I remember, I didn't ask them for a jersey number or anything. They just handed a bag of practice clothes."

He was given No. 30, and figured, what the heck, the name on the back was spelled right, so no problem.

"When I put it on, I noticed it smelled funny," he said. "It smelled like moth balls or something. Then I figured it out."

What the Wizards had done was give Rasheed Wallace's stuff to Ben. Rasheed had worn No. 30 previously. They figured it would save them from having to stitch another name on a new jersey.

"Can you believe that?" Wallace said, laughing.
_____
Maybe they can pull #30 out of moth balls again and just tear off the "ace" and give it to John Wall!

Posted by: paulh4 | July 1, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

merajc86 : Chris Webber also wore #2. check the facts before you make a comment.

Posted by: gmb2020 | July 1, 2010 4:26 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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