Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: dcsportsbog and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  E-mail alerts: Redskins and Sports  |  RSS

Stephen Strasburg's grip


Images via MASN's broadcast.


In case you haven't already memorized what Stephen Strasburg's various pitch grips look like, MASN and Rob Dibble offered a primer on Sunday. I found it interesting. The words are all Dibble's.

"The four-seam fastball grip, and by four-seam, [that means] when it rotates backwards, all four seams are rotating back. And look at the size of his middle finger, he gets almost all the way around the ball on that one."




"Two-seam, sinker, low to mid 90s, and only he and [Ubaldo] Jimenez feature that pitch right now in the Major Leagues. And he actually holds it kind of a hybrid. Most guys hold in in between the two seams; he's on the seam with his middle finger."




"Here's the slider, very common grip. Get that middle finger, get the seam on the outside part, and then you throw it over the top and you pull down towards your left knee."




"And then the circle change, maybe one of the hardest in the Major Leagues right now at 90-plus miles an hour. And there you see the circle finger right there on the inside, and two up top. And you have the same arm speed as a fastball, but the grip slows it down."

By Dan Steinberg  |  June 14, 2010; 1:31 PM ET
Categories:  Media , Nats  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Cooley eats condiments
Next: A D.C. United sign at the World Cup

Comments

Thats what she said

Posted by: Jimothy12 | June 14, 2010 1:40 PM | Report abuse

I'm just curious where he learned his pitches and grips. College? High school? Little league? His dad? A clinic? :)

Posted by: blackjack65 | June 14, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Pitchers learn all through their careers. Phil Hughues just started throwing his cutter after sitting in the bullpen with Rivera last season. He probably learned his basic fastball and curve from the time he started pitching, maybe high school or little league.

I don't know about Starsburg in particular. I don't know of many circle changes at the college level, so he may have just picked that one up since being drafted.

Posted by: LouLewis | June 14, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

You learn the 4 seamer the first time you pick up a baseball.

He probably learned that "slider" which is as much a curveball or slurve somewhere between age 12 and 16. It's a common pitch. Most guys just throw it 8-20 mph slower.

The two seamer is also a basic pitch and he could have learned that at any time. You just have to be good to get good movement.

The only pitch that is hard to learn is the circle change. As for when he learned to throw the 2 seamer and the change-up, you'd have to ask the man himself.

Posted by: GeorgeTowner2 | June 14, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Thanks for posting this. It went by pretty quickly on the broadcast but for a pitching novice was very educational.

Posted by: QuakerWildcat | June 15, 2010 11:34 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company