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A few words on women in NFL locker rooms

With a large assist from Clinton Portis, this whole Ines Sainz thing has somehow morphed into a debate on allowing women into NFL locker rooms rather. Which, from the league's standpoint, is no debate at all. Every reporter is treated equally, by this and every other league I know of. See the league's reminder this week.

But I'm getting a ton of e-mails and comments suggesting that it's a travesty for women to be inside a locker room with naked men, ever, no matter the circumstances. A lot of these e-mails and comments have significant inaccuracies, not to mention bonus electronic saliva. So, just for the heck of it, let me attempt to present a couple of facts. Please try to read these before offering up your outraged comments below.

Female reporters shouldn't be allowed in NFL locker rooms unless male reporters are allowed in WNBA locker rooms!!!!

Uh, male reporters are allowed in WNBA locker rooms.

To repeat, MALE REPORTERS ARE ALLOWED IN WNBA LOCKER ROOMS. They're there to, you know, do their jobs. Not to pick up dates or stare at women. To quote from Ann Killion:

The WNBA -- the playoffs are going on right now -- has the same rules as the NBA. Open locker rooms at designated times. In the NCAA tournament, the same rules govern both men and women's locker rooms -- they're both open at specific times. During the regular season, NCAA institutions can make their own rules about locker room availability, but during the tournament the NCAA has a uniform policy. When Stanford played UConn in last April's championship, if you wanted to see how devastated Jayne Appel was after her terrible shooting night, you needed to be in the locker room. I was there. So were my male colleagues.

So you can argue all you'd like about inviting reporters into locker rooms, but please don't say there's a double standard.

NOTE: Some of you point out that the women aren't technically naked in these WNBA locker rooms. That's besides the point. No one is forcing NFL players to disrobe in front of the media. The locker room is open, and they're choosing to get naked.

Female reporters shouldn't be allowed in NFL locker rooms unless male reporters are allowed in cheerleaders' dressing quarters!!!!!

I've gotten a few of these, as well. Look, say what you want about NFL cheerleaders, but their auditions often include swimsuit modeling, they wear next to nothing on the field, and a lot of men find them extremely appealing in a sexual way.

Until you can say the same thing about Kory Lichtensteiger or Casey Rabach, I'd argue this just isn't a valid comparison. I mean, unless you're really into back hair.

Privacy!!!! Athletes need privacy!!!!! They don't want to show their packages to the world!!!!!

After NFL games, there is a 10-minute cooling off period, during which the locker room is closed to the media. This period often lasts longer, sometimes significantly so. By the time we enter the room, some players -- often including Chris Cooley, for example -- are already showered and changed. There is also a private training room for players who'd like more privacy, plus the shower area.

Last Sunday, for example, Clinton Portis never appeared in the public areas of the Redskins' locker room, as far as I could tell. No one saw his package. Not one reporter. His locker was already empty when we were allowed to enter. Unless Portis is speaking at the podium, he almost never appears in a public place after the game, naked or otherwise.

The Redskins also have a team rule this year that (broadcast) media members cannot talk to players until they have their shirts on. So reporters generally stay away from players unless they're just about fully dressed. No one has enough time to waste standing around and waiting for someone to get dressed.

Also, some players choose to do all their interviews while still in their game uniforms, and then shower and change after the locker room empties. Andre Carter, for example, generally sits at his stall and does every single interview while still in football clothes, and only then goes to shower after the reporters are gone.

So if you're a shy type and you don't want to be seen naked, it's very, very easy to avoid.

But NFL locker rooms are seething pits of molten-hot testosterone fountains, prowled by sex-starved He-Men!!!!! Sexualized encounters are inevitable!!!!!

If you've spent lots of time in NFL locker rooms and you've come to this conclusion, I guess I can't dissuade you.

To me, NFL locker rooms are not hyper-sexualized dens of flirtation in which women stare at packages and men stare at curves and everyone's just thinking about whom to bed. Post-game locker rooms are about sweaty and dirty jerseys, open wounds, back hair, man-boobs, the smell of soiled laundry, jostling reporters with microphones and tape recorders, platters of orange slices, Mike Wise asking what his column should be about and Sonny and Sam in their full suits hanging out with Larry Michael as they interview Mike Shanahan. These scenes are about as sexy as the 80-and-over South Florida Shuffleboard Championships.

I mean, on Sunday, I was interviewing Brian Orakpo when he suddenly got a cramp in his leg and gasped in pain. If he was thinking about sex just then, I'm Ines Sainz.

The mid-week open locker rooms at Redskins Park are a bit different, certainly jollier and filled with more wisecracks and towel snaps, but still, probably half of the guys have pictures of children or wives or Biblical quotes by their stalls, and you can't take a step without landing on a crumpled-up hunk of foul athletic tape. I mean, I'm not sure what your idea of sexy is, but this really isn't like being in a Vegas showroom.

But but but!!!!! Shouldn't there be some boundaries!!!!!!

Look, I don't know where you work, but imagine being there, and then imagine there were suddenly 300-pound naked men thrust into the picture. Would that make your life easier? Would the level of workplace arousal go up? Do you think reporters, whatever their gender, decided en masse that their lives would only be complete if they could do their jobs while in the presence of nakedness?

I'm pretty sure 99.7 percent of reporters would say "hell yes" if offered the chance to only interview fully dressed people. But more important than comfort is speed, especially after night games like last week's. All our reporters had to file stories within 30 seconds of the final whistle, run down to the locker room, and then refile as quickly as possible to have any chance of getting post-game quotes into a few hundred thousand papers.

If teams told players to stay dressed until interviews were done, I'm sure we'd all be thrilled. But players have places to go, and they're in a hurry, and we have deadlines, and we're in a hurry, and so some of the players get shower and get changed while others of them talk to reporters. It's not controversial, or strange, or sexualized, or prurient. It's just life.

Now, say whatever you want about Ines Sainz, how she dresses, or how she behaves on-air. But if you want to make this into some larger debate about female reporters entering locker rooms, please at least understand these facts.

(More from Tracee Hamilton)

(More from Cindy Boren.)

By Dan Steinberg  | September 15, 2010; 10:01 AM ET
Categories:  Media  
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Comments

Woah there, this is way too rational a post for a hot button news story like this.

Posted by: harrisongoodman | September 15, 2010 10:27 AM | Report abuse

How about we just deal with the rational arguments then Stein? If a woman wants to be taken seriously as a reporter in an NFL lockerroom, then perhaps she should dress in conformity with the generally accepted standards of professionalism, as opposed to dressing like some Hip-Hop Video hoe. Frankly, the way the media has dealt with this story has been disgusting. How about holding the female reporter in question accountable for her presentation? What other reporters were dressed that way in any locker room? And Catcalls of "Bonita Senorita" hardly rise to the levels of harassment.

I love how the story has become more about Portis' opinion offered on a radio program as opposed to some relatively unknown reporter who has created a story and has gotten 20 minutes of fame out of the deal.

Posted by: keino83 | September 15, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

I really don't care if she or anyone else was offended or not offended by the players behavior or Portis's comments. There are more important problems in the world today than this politically correct garbage. Ines Sainz isn't even good looking. She has a nice looking body but her face is a disgrace.

Posted by: jtrip132211 | September 15, 2010 10:34 AM | Report abuse

Thanks for clearing things up. Now, if someone can convince CP that professional journalists (both male & female) have no interest in his litle package...then we can put this to rest!

Posted by: capsnnats | September 15, 2010 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Do your interviews on the field or in the press room after the game.

Posted by: cowbell | September 15, 2010 10:35 AM | Report abuse

Well said.

Posted by: StuScott_Booyahs | September 15, 2010 10:39 AM | Report abuse

@cowbell, players have to leave the field after handshakes to get back in the locker room. The PR folks arrange for one or two very brief interviews for their TV partners, but there's no access for the rest of us.

As for this "press room," I don't think you understand. The locker room IS the press room. There is a podium for formal press conferences, generally just the coach and one or two players. No other players ever get anywhere near that room. There is no "press room."

Posted by: DanSteinberg1 | September 15, 2010 10:51 AM | Report abuse

@cowbell Reporters aren't always given field access, so that's not always an option. In fact, it's not where you'd want to do an interview, anyway. As for the press room, the PR folks only bring the coach, QB and a star player or two to the podium for interviews, but if you want to do a sidebar or feature on someone else, you have to go to the locker room for the interview.

Posted by: CDon | September 15, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

One , Very Important detail that MOST FEMALE REPORTERS fails to bring up in there rant. In FEMALE SPORTS women are given time to shower and get dressed atleast 20 minutes after the game before any REPORTER is alowwed into the locker room. Where Men are not given the same concession's these men are playing a football game , which I think everyone can agree takes a toll on somones body. I know they get paid well but no ones privacy should be taken away because the media wants to catch them in heated moments. Instead in mens sports media of BOTH gender are alowwed to wander around the locker room among naked YOUNG ADULTS these men are 20-40 . DONT FORGET women go into male college athletes locker rooms also these boys are only 17-21 how is this okay? Why do men not deserve the same privacy we have heard some players speak out how they are uncomfortable . Why is that not enough for the league to want to protect these players and change the policy to give the Men privacy .. its very obvious to me that
its 2010 and men have changed and want ther privacy. One thing I do know if this was woman arguing for privacy from men things would move much faster. There are HARSH double standards in Society and the Mentality of America. I hope these players get there privacy. Reporters should have a SEPERATE ROOM. I guess we fail to remember recent locker room mishaps with people running after david beckham, lady gaga walking into the locker room with 2 friends at yankee stadium flashing her boobs at the men in the locker room, . Recently the reporter in Italy Groping David Beckham ? IM just saying things have changed maybe just maybe all women arent saints?

this isnt the inez's first time making headlines... she made headlines when she showed up to the patriots locker room in a wedding gown asking tom brady to marry her, then after that she went in the dallas locker room after a win and had them hoist her up on there shoulders... she even went around measuring players biceps One of the days. If People think women dont look at mens *****'s in the locker room... DO some research on a lady Patti Shea she did a article and printed in the los angeles news paper how she was a cotton towel from seeing what every woman wanted to see ( http://www.lukeford.net/profiles/profiles/patti_shea.htm. ) <~~~( A LINK TO WHAT PATTI SHEA WROTE ) Visanthoe shiancoe was caught on live tv naked , because the media had to be in the locker room, dont we think its time Men were given privacy?


Posted by: Standards86 | September 15, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

@Standard86 - Did you read the blog entry before posting your rant?

Particularly this passage: "After the game, there is a 10-minute cooling off period, during which the locker room is closed to the media. This period often lasts longer. By the time we enter the room, some players -- often including Chris Cooley, for example -- are already showered and changed. There is also a private training room for players who'd like more privacy, plus the shower area."

Posted by: emanon13 | September 15, 2010 11:03 AM | Report abuse

No matter how much you attempt to clean up the atmosphere i.e. (the red skins have there shirts on when interviewed".) Bottom line she was still in the LOCKERROOM, where men are men, and if they see a woman in not just jeans, but jeans that make her butt look like a ripe cantaloupe, your are going to have attraction that may go to far. It's human nature, Its not about being equal, its about putting everybody in an appropiate situation. Not every woman reporter is attractive enough to get such attention, but you have to understand that human nature, men are going to look at, and speak to women they find attractive.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Nice timing. I was literally looking for your email to ask if you could inform me on the access of male reporters to women's locker rooms when I came across your latest post. Not only have you answered my question before I even asked, but (despite your rational opinions) you have also kept my dreams of a sports journalism career alive..... are there locker rooms for women's beach volleyball?

Posted by: rihardy | September 15, 2010 11:04 AM | Report abuse

Its a red herring. The players should be allowed privacy. The reporters should be allowed interviews in a conference room. Nothing vital is coming out of the locker room today. If there is, its just trash and negativity. This is the area that most reporters are assaulted. This is where enemies are made. Equal access for reporters is where this started. Dan Steinberg may like being in the womens locker room at a WNBA game, but there is no need to be there, or there is no excuse to be there. Nothing vital, that the sports fan wants to know about is in that locker room. So somebody cried, so what! Who cares? Where does it stop? If I become a local sports reporter for my hometown paper can I go into the girls volleyball locker room. Absurd you say, would never happen. Well at one time gays on TV would never happen. Gay marriage was not ever a possibility twenty years ago. North American Man Boy Love Association (NAMBLA) would be an impossibility. Farting in public and thinking it was funny would never happen. Tattoos and piercings were only for trashy people or those with cultural reasons and the military. This world is a jungle and getting worse. Does a woman have a right to view 53 p*ckers in order to maintain equality? We've lost it!

Posted by: 1bmffwb | September 15, 2010 11:06 AM | Report abuse

And you know, whats the difference, whether women know it or not, whether women want it or not, you are being looked at by men everyday. Does anybody remember the movie "Any Given Sunday", the lockroom scene (they were many), when a player was shown full frontal, that atmosphere is the atmosphere in lockerooms, don't tell me about private areas, the players are walking around in vary stages of dress, reportes have to circumvent them selves through the players to get to players they want to interview. Is it only sexual harassment if they say something, but not if they just walk around naked

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 11:12 AM | Report abuse

While getting my engineering degree, I got "absorbed" by the techno-flower children in my building. Many of them are good friends of mine to this day. You name the alternative lifestyle, drastic surgery, or manner of classification, and I have friends who fit. I even had two orgies occur in my building while a student, one outside my bedroom door. I'm no prude. Just to give you my background.

Sooooo ... I see this news item about a few cat calls in a locker room filled with 50 athletes. Okay, I think, let's see what this lady has to say, being interviewed afterward by another woman, so she can can "complain." This "highly distraught" reporter (not) is UNBUTTONED TO THE _BOTTOM_ OF HER CLEAVAGE!!!! And she wants to be respected when she walks into a locker room ???!!!??

There's what you do behind closed doors, in an environment of friends who all agreed to a level of exposure (or optional complete nudity) ahead of time. Then there's in front of a public television camera, and into a room full of testosterone-laden athletes who you have barely talked to before, let alone been practically undressed in front of. Jeepers, what the heck are these guys supposed to do, put on blindfolds and stuff duct tape into their mouths?

Have you SEEN the alternate angles on the jeans she wore into that locker room? Those jeans were PAINTED onto her! I want to see how she gets those jeans ON and OFF! Does she need a friend to help her? I remember when I was a child at the end of the 1970's, and still remember a girl in a bathroom stall at JC Penney's, crying to her friend to come into the stall and help her get her over-tight jeans BACK ON.

This woman is not expressing "style." She is blatantly, and knowingly, capitalizing on her body to get ahead in her profession (or apparently to me, to quickly get pregnant by a rich athlete and collect 20 years of support).

To say that this manner of dress is acceptable for Hispanic TV is stretching an excuse to the max. Hispanics are overwhelmingly Catholic, and I'm sure in their minds, there is a limit to how far one can go before it's blatantly obvious that your intent might just not be to get married before procreation.

Hey, if the male sports teams and their owners allow female reporters into the locker room, who am I to say, or frankly even care. But if you don't want verbal abuse, DRESS PROFESSIONALLY. Don't be a hypocrite.

There is a limit. If you want even the slightest modicum of respect, stick to jeans you can pull on and off YOURSELF after a full day's exercise, and BUTTON your shirt up to just ABOVE your cleavage when complaining about cat calls, for **** sake!


Posted by: UndoTheDamage | September 15, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

In the context of the real world workplace in corporate America the NFL is out of whack. Ask anyone who has had to sit through an HR seminar on sexual harassment how well allowing members of the opposite sex to enter each others locker room's at the company gym would go over with HR. Just the acknowledgement of a person's outfit as 'nice' can be considered inappropriate . . . so what if a male athlete feels it's inappropriate to have female members of the media present in a clothing optional environment specifically designated for men? Maybe Portis feels uncomfortable. Don't his concerns have any validity? In the modern American workplace his concerns would trump the cause of access. Portis could file a sexual harassment suit against the NFL for their policy - that's corporate reality right now. Trust me; my company is clear that you can be written up for something as reflexive as looking at a coworker’s cleavage or 'package' even if completely reflexive. The NFL provides a courtesy to reporters by allowing you access to their player's 'private space'. Yes, I've been in plenty of pro-locker and non-pro locker rooms and know it's not a big deal. BUT the reality is that if the NFL was a member of the corporate American mainstream they would create a more conscientious workplace where media members only had access to the players on the player’s terms where the potential harassment of a player - even by an inappropriate look - would be limited and not tolerated. Sounds crazy but that's our corporate culture in a litigious and our gender neutral workplace. Try going to talk to your boss about a project the next time she is in the locker room in your company gym (if you have one) and see how long you last.

Posted by: kmag1 | September 15, 2010 11:14 AM | Report abuse

Excellent description of the way athletes and media interact after games, and why.

The comments about how Sainz was dressed are like people saying a rape victim "was asking for it."

These guys are professional athletes: whether they're in the locker room, a media event, wherever, there should be zero tolerance for something like this.

Posted by: rick5 | September 15, 2010 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Oh and I love fact how woman want to be so innocent in this situation regarding the fact they are equally atracted to men. Women like looking at men, women like talking about men, women will look at a man they are attracted to if they have the chance, its all human nature, we are human people. And yes, women do check out packages, even if they don't want to admit it. We can be politically correct without being naive.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 11:18 AM | Report abuse

I have a question, why don't sports writers find something interesting to write about. How about some stories on what made an athlete great. Maybe ask the athletes who they respect most at their position. Ask what they are doing in the off-season to get better. What are your goals for the season? How did you get started in sports? You know, sports related questions. MANY FANS TURN TO SPORTS TO GET AWAY FROM EVERYDAY DRAMA!!! WE WANT ENTERTAINMENT AND ESCAPE!!! NOT MORE CONTROVERSY!!! There really is only about one in twenty articles that are worth reading. Thats why fans burn up the internet looking for something informational to occupy their time. Fat Albert has a place in the sports news, but he should not be the whole story every day. There are 53 stories on the team, each one different, each one unique. There is also a large coaching staff. Can't the writers find a human interest sports story somewhere? So far this season we have missed out on the receivers and how they are working with the receivers coach. No in depth reporting, just passing remarks. This is an important position on our team. There are lots of topics but rot-gut reporting.

Posted by: 1bmffwb | September 15, 2010 11:20 AM | Report abuse

So, this writer is correcting Clinton Portis? Is that what I'm hearing? This guy knows more about NFL locker rooms, interviews, the states of dress that players are seen in, and the feelings of the players better than a 9 year NFL veteran, who was also a top player at a premier college program for 3 years?

Are you kidding me? While you attempt to be a know it all, Mr. Steinberg, your ignorance is showing.

Posted by: DWS1 | September 15, 2010 11:29 AM | Report abuse

Answer this question for me. Can some one else be "offended for you", apparently, since you want to get out the facts; Inez was not the female who complained, there was another female reporter who witnessed/overheard was being said to Inez, why don't we know the name of this other reporter, let me guess, her bottom probably does not look as nice as Inez's does. Maybe the other reporter did not like the fact she wasn't getting the attention, maybe the other reporter was jealous Inez was getting the story. I want to know who was the other reporter who ACTUALLY made the complaints.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 11:29 AM | Report abuse

I still do not know why Clinton Portis was wrong. How professional can the players be standing there in a bath towel and flip-flops while Ms. Hot Tomale walks around.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

Excellent post. Thanks for the clear explanation.

Posted by: dbunkr | September 15, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

Mr. Steinberg, I think you are a proponent of sexual harassment if you think its okay for women to walk around a lockeroom full of naked men. You can't advocate no reporters in the lockeroom to alleviate the stress of having women in the lockeroom causes. If I were a reporter, could I stand in front Lisa leslie locker right after she stepped out of the shower, all she has on is her sports bra and a towel, I don't think that interview would take place.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 11:45 AM | Report abuse

Hey Steinberg....when did you lose your manhood? Maybe it's because you've never been a player and had to shower and dress in front of handful of reporters, particularly, female reports.

Bottom line is, Ines Sainz is not a legitimate sports reporter. She is a sensationalist puppet put in by Azteca TV to promote sexuality in their program to attract male viewers. If she were a bonifide reporter, find out what journalism school she went to and where she worked previously as a sports reporter, before Azteca TV.

Steinberg, your manhood called... it's still lost.

Posted by: sd-bones | September 15, 2010 11:53 AM | Report abuse

holy bejeezus but these commenters are a bunch of troglodytes who must hyperventilate any time a woman with a C-cup comes within 20 yards of them. the "she was asking for it" and "look at how she was dressed" defenses are pathetic at best and criminal at worst.

Steinz - thanks as always for attempting bring a bit of rational thought to the irrational world of sports and sports fans. seems like it's getting harder to feel good about being part of the latter these days.

Posted by: dimesmakedollars | September 15, 2010 12:01 PM | Report abuse

Anyone posting 6 unanswered fuming, raging comments on this blog post should maybe take a deep breath and figure out what the hell is so, SO upsetting, here, and maybe if that energy couldn't be directed elsewhere.

Posted by: shekb | September 15, 2010 12:18 PM | Report abuse

@dimesmakedollars

I am no arguing she deserves to be mis-treated, but asking her to conform to the acceptable standards of professionalism is certainly not too much to ask. See Kelli Johnson.

Posted by: keino83 | September 15, 2010 12:22 PM | Report abuse

Funny thing nobody even mentions Brian Mitchell at the beginning of the clip and how he said Mike Wise is wearing a skirt by checking on the baby at night while he wears the pants and goes to bed as his wife checks on the baby.

The only thing this story could have ever turned into was a referendum on women in the locker room because the simple facts are she never made a big deal about it and she is not practicing the code of professional sports media women attire or behavior. There is no story here about injustice and really the only people to blame are the Association of Women in Sports Media for the complaint. If they wanted a poster child for this cause, this was just not the right person. www.forallfankind.com

Posted by: raybell84 | September 15, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

After the game, there is a 10-minute cooling off period, during which the locker room is closed to the media. This period often lasts longer. By the time we enter the room, some players -- often including Chris Cooley, for example -- are already showered and changed. There is also a private training room for players who'd like more privacy, plus the shower area.

====

That's missing the point. Why dance around the fact that men and women have, um, a proclivity towards certain relationships?

If you want fair, sometimes the Old Boys Club has to change. If you want to treat men and women the same, it doesn't always mean treating women just like men. Sometimes the rules have to change completely.

The only way to remove the possibility of sexualized interviews with nearly and completely naked athletes is to close up the locker room.

Why not?

Posted by: WorstSeat | September 15, 2010 12:39 PM | Report abuse

keino83 is right. This reporter was sent to be provocative. Send this women to the middle east to cover a soccer game and see how see is treated. Professional standards (including appropriate dress) need to be adhered to by players and reporters. Mexico doesn't give a frig about US football so why is she here.

Posted by: pjohn2 | September 15, 2010 12:39 PM | Report abuse

To anyone reading 6 posts, that are opinionated and not raging or fuming, must have something to say. What do you want to talk about shekb?

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 12:43 PM | Report abuse

I don't think there's anything wrong with Steinberg's post. This controversy certainly has shifted from the original case to a debate about women in the locker rooms, and Steinberg simply clarified some misconceptions.

HOWEVER, I would like the debate to go back to its original focus and wish the media would collectively take a long, hard look in the mirror and ask themselves whether they pre-judged the Jets in this case before all the facts were in and before an investigation had even begun. The media has presumed the Jets were guilty of harassment without even considering the possibility that this woman set the team up as part of a publicity stunt.

To me, it seems obvious this woman is using this to gain fame and make a name for herself and Aztec TV.

Also, as an aside, I really wish people would stop calling her "hot." Not sure what woman they are looking at, but take a look at her face people, she is not even remotely pretty.

Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 12:58 PM | Report abuse

She was obviously asking for it, look how she was dressed. Snort.

Man, the knuckle draggers have busted out of their cages today.

Posted by: timleary_20016 | September 15, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

Well written, Dan!

Posted by: stwasm | September 15, 2010 1:06 PM | Report abuse

All players should be censored from commenting on a situation not related to football.Portis continues to be allowed to open his big mouth on something that he knew nothing about,because he was not there.His performance on the field should be the topic of conversation in his interviews,not a personal thing like the Jets case.Also,Bmitch,please pick your words carefully,you could end up in the same boat.

Posted by: ruru2000 | September 15, 2010 1:14 PM | Report abuse

She was obviously asking for it, look how she was dressed. Snort.

Man, the knuckle draggers have busted out of their cages today.

Posted by: timleary_20016 | September 15, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

No offense, but you really are an idiot dude. You are using the line about rape against people who are being accused of making some sexual comments. HUGE difference dude. Huge.

Women who dress like she does do not in any, way, shape or form deserve to be raped, nor are they invited rape, etc etc etc. HOWEVER, women who dress like she do are inviting extra attention from men and if you deny this you are simply an utter moron.

Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 1:18 PM | Report abuse

Locker room areas are always less formal and less serious than suit and tie press conferences with lights and a podium. If you're going after a quote in the dirty, smelly, littered locker room, then expect a different environment.

Without nit-picking the way a female dresses and acts, it's not unfair to say that Inez Sainz dresses and acts in a way that gets and holds the attention of men who see her on television and men who see her in person too. And she was actually pretty reasonable about what happened.

Newsgathering from the locker room is not an afternoon high tea.

Posted by: blasmaic | September 15, 2010 1:18 PM | Report abuse

Women don't put on skin tight jeans by accident, they know how they look in them, they want men to see how they look in them. And, Barno1, its not her face thats attracting all the attention.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 1:23 PM | Report abuse

Why doesn't Clinton, the NFLPA et. all just sue the NFL for sexual harassment for allowing females into their locker room where the players/employees are required by their employer to change clothes, shower, receive medical and emotional treatment and conduct meetings? Anyone think that any player that sues is going to lose regardless of sport or amateur or professional?

In the age of information, all readers/fans want as much info as we can get but we crossed the line a long time ago about the correct way to get it.
No locker room should be open to the media. The media should be provided access to the team after a game or practice in an auditorium.

Posted by: neil64 | September 15, 2010 1:30 PM | Report abuse

Is this Cindy Boren standing in for Dan Steinberg? Sneaky!

Posted by: richs91 | September 15, 2010 1:36 PM | Report abuse

The moral of the story...dress like a journalist to be treated like a journalist. Dress like a groupie to be treated like a groupie. Seriously, if I were to come into the locker room as a fan/journalist and wear my Sean Taylor jersey, would I expect players to take me seriously as a journalist?

Posted by: DocHolliday1906 | September 15, 2010 1:41 PM | Report abuse

Ok, if there are people that think Inez's attire was appropiate, then I want to see Katie Curic do the evening news in a pair of booty jeans.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 1:43 PM | Report abuse

I realize the lockerroom is a great place to get quotes and all, but it is ridiculous that there is no expectation of privacy when you are naked in your place of work. This would seem to be an open-and-shut case if anyone cared to sue. Thanks, Ines Sainz.

Posted by: jimwest20 | September 15, 2010 1:44 PM | Report abuse

She wants to trade on her sex appeal until it is inconvenient, then she becomes a blushing virgin. Don't dress like a hooker and expect to be treated like a nun!

Having said that, I don't think there should be any media allowed in the locker room. Let the players decide when and if they want to talk to reporters.

Posted by: xconservative | September 15, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

The question isn't necessarily if locker rooms are safe for women - are they safe for MEN?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DKyq029fFI

Posted by: lizbohnsack | September 15, 2010 1:52 PM | Report abuse

I don't think there should be ANYBODY in the locker room but players and coaches.

They could either give press access to the locker room for 15 minutes or so after a game, then shoo them out so the team can shower

OR they could have players come out into the hallway or another room to talk to the press.

There's not too many jobs where they require you to talk around nekkid in front of strangers--with cameras even?

In any case, WHO CARES what this woman was wearing? If a woman shows a bit of cleavage does that mean it's ok to harass her?

Aren't we past the days where if a woman is attacked people assume it was HER fault and judge her by what she was wearing?

What is this, the 1950s?

Posted by: Mikeystyle | September 15, 2010 1:53 PM | Report abuse

Locker rooms should be off limits to reporters. The should use a media room outside of the locker room. Reporters should not be in the huddle or on the team bus, let's start respecting privacy again.

Posted by: sarno | September 15, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

The post-game locker room, with sweaty players stripped down, is why some viewers watch football games, and advertisers know that. NO television network is going to allow teams to ban reporters from the locker rooms. Sorry, players. It's about advertising dollars.

Posted by: HookedOnThePost | September 15, 2010 1:58 PM | Report abuse

Dan, nice rational comments - except you forfeited your credibility when you failed to point out a very significant difference between female reporter access to the Redskins locker room and male access to the WNBA. The Miami Herald's Michelle Kaufman has said:

Why not do it the way the WNBA does it? Reporters come in for 15-20 minutes, the athletes do interviews fully clothed, and then reporters are asked to leave, doors are closed, and the athletes can shower and change in privacy and peace. Seems like a civil solution.

So Dan, you just happened to leave out the fact that male reporters are not interviewing naked WNBA players. Why would you leave that out? So now the rest of your response is suspect as far as I am concerned. Your bias is clear.

Posted by: jfmam5323 | September 15, 2010 1:59 PM | Report abuse

I don't think it makes me an idiot to point out exactly what at least a dozen posters have said -- what did she expect, look how she was dressed.

And last I looked, we're not talking about "extra attention from men." We're talking about sexual harassement. HUGE difference, dude. Huge.

Posted by: timleary_20016 | September 15, 2010 1:59 PM | Report abuse

Who shows up at the Super Bowl 3 years ago in a wedding dress and asks Tom Brady to get married? Sainz insulted the 99 percent of female journalists who do the job professionally. Dress like you take it seriously and not like you are about to go out clubbing.

Posted by: jrsconstruction | September 15, 2010 2:01 PM | Report abuse

Fact: Ines Sainz stands to get a TON of publicity about this, more fame, and more appearances on national and international TV.

Fact: The Jets stand to take a public relations hit from this

Fact: The overwhelming majority of media covering this issue rushed to judgment before the facts were in

Fact: Sainz originally said this wasn't a big deal but when the feminists rushed to her defense feigning outrage, she then went on every talk show imaginable to talk about how big of a deal it is.

Fact: According to Bleacher Report "TV Azteca isn't the most professional news organization in the history of journalism.
Their reporters are all about selling sex, with unbuttoned blouses and shock stunts like sending a reporter to the Super Bowl in a wedding dress shouting that she was the real Mrs. Tom Brady. They're a joke of a news organization" Which again lends credence to the theory that this was all a staged publicity stunt.

Fact: Inez showed up to the Super Bowl media day a few years ago in a very, very flaunting outfit exposing her midriff and attracting the attention from dozens of real journalists, including the Post's Jason La Canfora (who wrote about the incident here: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/redskinsinsider/tv-azteca-setting-the-standard.html)

Fact: Also according to Bleacher Report, Ines was "at the Super Bowl two years ago doing a very hard-hitting story on the size of the players' biceps...When part of your job is groping men's arms for a story, you put yourself in a position where, unfortunately, these types of things can happen. Maybe Ines should focus on the actual games instead of the size of athletes' muscles."


Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 2:06 PM | Report abuse

And by the way, Barno, for what it's worth, I agree with all of your observations. I just also happen to agree with Dan's blog (which, as you point out, deals with the broader issue of female reporters in the locker room, not whether this particular reporter was sexually harassed). So, honestly, no offense (and I won't follow that up by calling you an idiot and a moron).

Posted by: timleary_20016 | September 15, 2010 2:12 PM | Report abuse

Her can is PERFECT. If Sir Mix a Lot was there, he would have exploded.

Posted by: Please_Fix_VAs_Roads | September 15, 2010 2:15 PM | Report abuse

My bad, timleary...guess I misunderstood your point. I thought you were comparing what happened to her to rape. I hate when people say a woman was begging to be raped by wearing skimpy clothing...but I also think that's apples and oranges to what happened here.

Men are going to hoot and holler at a woman who is dressed like her, and I don't really see any reason why they shouldn't. I disagree with the vast majority of the media covering this issue, who seem to almost universally believe that she "didn't deserve to have those players hollering at her." I believe she did deserve it.

Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

Let's talk about a "hostile work environment." When a female reporter like Sainz comes into a locker room full of naked men and "sexualizes" it with her appearance (the best test of whether that's occurring is the response from those men), she's just created a hostile work environment for them - especially when it makes them subject to reprisals, fines, etc. from their employer for responding honestly. Now before you launch the "boo hoo, be a man" shaming tactics consider this: I'm sure if a male reporter did something considered provocative, whether it was his intention or not, in a WNBA locker room, we'd hear about that and how it adversely affected the players. There would be profuse apologies from him and his wimpy bosses. I think the Jets players should sue the NFL and the Jets for sexual harassment for creating a hostile work environment when they allowed Sainz to enter the locker room dressed inappropriately. If the playing field is truly level and the standards of behavior are applied the same, I have no problem with female reporters in mens' locker rooms - but it's not level and the hypocrisy continues.

Posted by: jfmam5323 | September 15, 2010 2:18 PM | Report abuse

Why is there a market or demand for women reporters in the locker room anyway? What happened to her on the practice field was not professional and wrong.

Posted by: masterfix | September 15, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Boys will be boys...

They are playing a boys game, they act like boys, no one was hurt.

Sorry the athletes are not as professional as the reporters...they don't have to be. You aren't interviewing the president of the USA.

Posted by: khornbeak | September 15, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

How about NOT a debate about whether women should be in locker rooms. That debate was settled about 25 years ago. How about a debate about whether professional athletes making millions of dollars should be allowed to be jerks in public.

Posted by: tboyer33 | September 15, 2010 2:22 PM | Report abuse

Once again, Barno, I agree with you completely. Goodness knows I'd make appropriate note of her magnificent money maker. And I appreciate your civility -- if only it was the norm on these boards.

Posted by: timleary_20016 | September 15, 2010 2:25 PM | Report abuse

The idea that women have a RIGHT be in a locker room, where men shower and change their clothes is ridiculous.

Imagine if male reporters DEMANDED the same RIGHT to female athletes locker rooms.

Let the players shower and change clothes BEFORE the media onslaught;

OR

Simply interview the players ON THE FIELD, BEFORE they head for the showers.

The solution is so SIMPLE, it's embarrassing the "bright bulbs" in the media CAN'T get it.

Posted by: chicago77 | September 15, 2010 2:37 PM | Report abuse

The photo I saw of Ms. Sainz showed her in a skin-tight outfit while on the sideline at a game. If she doesn't want to draw attention or comments, she shouldn't put it on display.

But we all know the networks want her and her colleagues to be on display. The attention and comments have to be expected. She knows the role of sex in her job, and dresses accordingly. If she doesn't like it, she should dress modestly, if her employer will allow it.

They won't.

Posted by: Garak | September 15, 2010 2:42 PM | Report abuse

This is all ridiculous and not the point and not about the way a woman dresses, etc.

1) If male reporters have access to the locker room so should women reporters
2) Same goes for women's sports and male reporter
3) So either then all in or none
4) It's so not rocket science

Posted by: skurtzman | September 15, 2010 2:44 PM | Report abuse

Stupidest controversy ever:

Let all reporters in all locker rooms or figure out how to do interviews while everyone is clothed.

Posted by: skurtzman | September 15, 2010 2:46 PM | Report abuse

She's welcome in my locker room any time she wants, and I promise to not disrespect her.

Posted by: Apostrophe | September 15, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

I don't think there's anything wrong with Steinberg's post. This controversy certainly has shifted from the original case to a debate about women in the locker rooms, and Steinberg simply clarified some misconceptions.

HOWEVER, I would like the debate to go back to its original focus and wish the media would collectively take a long, hard look in the mirror and ask themselves whether they pre-judged the Jets in this case before all the facts were in and before an investigation had even begun. The media has presumed the Jets were guilty of harassment without even considering the possibility that this woman set the team up as part of a publicity stunt.

To me, it seems obvious this woman is using this to gain fame and make a name for herself and Aztec TV.

Also, as an aside, I really wish people would stop calling her "hot." Not sure what woman they are looking at, but take a look at her face people, she is not even remotely pretty.

Posted by: Barno1

==================================

Uh, look at her face? I was too busy looking at.....Oh, never mind.

Seriously, I wonder if this incident is part of a backlash against the Jets in general. Coach Ryan has made a name for himself with his potty mouth and the arrogant swagger, and maybe it rubbed off on the rest of the team..

Posted by: bbface21 | September 15, 2010 2:58 PM | Report abuse

A women should be able to stroll into an NFL lock room butt a*# naked and still be treated with dignity. Yes, we are all animals with basic caveman instincts, but gentlemen keep their impulsive thoughts to themselves. Is this reality? Unfortunately no. Is Clinton Portis a gentleman? No

Posted by: fixcongress | September 15, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

This is a topic difficult to discuss with media personell because they're all going to defend their position as well as their collegues. Those who oppose their position are nt going to get very far.

Posted by: MHEDRLT | September 15, 2010 3:05 PM | Report abuse

This is a topic difficult to discuss with media personell because they're all going to defend their position as well as their collegues. Those who oppose their position are not going to get very far.

Posted by: MHEDRLT | September 15, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

There is a very simple solution. Restrict access to all media to the locker room. Set up a press room for that purpose. End of discussion.

Posted by: planejon | September 15, 2010 3:11 PM | Report abuse

Portis 7, Inez 0

Posted by: elwoll | September 15, 2010 3:18 PM | Report abuse

Steinberg is wrong in saying that the NBA and WNBA have the same rules for locker rooms. The WNBA allows reporters in for only 30 minutes after a game. The NBA has no such restrictions. Steinberg is either an ignoramus or a liar.

Posted by: ThisIsReality | September 15, 2010 3:22 PM | Report abuse

I am a New Englander and have not routed for the Patriots since the Lisa Olson incident. I think the Jets should have acted more professional.
However I do no think this women is a serious journalist and she does seem to be an opportunist.
The Jets were wrong but I think this women has set back woman sports writers 20 years.

Posted by: mmad2 | September 15, 2010 3:23 PM | Report abuse

Man, I'd love to bone Ines Sainz. So would every other NFL player. She knows what she's doing and she also knows the openness of Mexican media towards sex. This story is probably a result of some ugly female reporter in the locker room at the same time, who was not getting the same type of attention as Inez Sainz. Woman and jealousy go hand-in-hand!

Posted by: shalshah | September 15, 2010 3:23 PM | Report abuse

Since when do football players act professional? Football is a sport...! It is meant for fun. Bring more women in men's locker rooms. Those guys need some eye candy after grueling two-a-days... !

Posted by: shalshah | September 15, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Frankly, I think those post-game sound bites are useless anyway mostly because you clowns ask stupid questions. How did you feel? What were your emotions? How big a game/play/whatever was that? In this age of 24/7/365 news your deadlines are irrelevant. The locker room should be off limits. Players should have adequate time to shower and dress then meet reporters in the press room.

But, just to clarify your point about male reporters in WNBA locker rooms. Are any of the women running around nude like you might find in a male locker room? Are you absolutely sure the rules are the same?

As far as I'm concerned this was a set up all the way. This hot chick "reporter" is sent to the Jets to show off her attributes and wander the locker room and see what kind of reaction she could stir up. Then she parlays it into plenty of national publicity for herself and her TV station. Frankly, the NFL and the Jets should be ashamed for their lightening quick apology. Apology for what? Is there any proof that anyone did anything wrong? What the league should have done is said they would look into the matter and comment after all of the facts were in. Instead, they sound like Obama apologizing for America. Disgusting performance by the league and you for writing this garbage.

Posted by: POPS1 | September 15, 2010 3:26 PM | Report abuse

Ines Sainz was not dressed as a professional journalist . My wife is a journalist and would never dress that way for an interview. I know Latin women like to dress somewhat different than their American counterparts (my wife is Latina) and this is normal for them. However I don’t think male athletes in this or any country are prepared for a woman dressed the way she was to come into their locker room. Perhaps the next time she enters a locker room she will dress as a professional. I am sure she will then be treated like one.

Posted by: ChrisC-Photographer | September 15, 2010 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Has it ever been a problem that some reporter surreptitiously took a nude locker room photo of a famous player that ended up on the Internet?

Posted by: rjma1 | September 15, 2010 3:30 PM | Report abuse

Inez Sainz needs to quit with this. She wants to dress provacatively and then complain when she actually provokes neanderthal football players into coming on to her. What does she expect? To complain about a few balls being thrown her way, and a few lite off-color comments coming from juvenile athletes in a locker room, is just sheer foolishness on her part and she's only hurting her reputation in doing so. If I were a male athlete, I'd stay far away from her and not grant her a single interview. Develop a thicker skin sistah.

And before I get a bunch of comments abut how I'm probably jealous of Inez or that I'm unattractive or some such nonsense - neither is the case. I'm an attractive woman who's had to fend off many an inappropriate sexist border-line harassing comment, both in and outside of work. Yes, professional respect should be a given, but sometimes ITS NOT and so then MUST BE EARNED. If you dress like a hoochie, they're going to make you EARN their respect. DUH! So realize that when you decide what to wear in the morning. If you dress professionally and consistent with the standards of decency for your job, then you'll likely be treated as such. And this doubly important when you work around immature, testosterone filled clowns who throw balls around for a living. I think what happened to Sainz, has more to do with her inappropriately way too tight jeans than anything else. I wear tight jeans too - BUT NOT TO WORK. Yes, the men were immature, and likely said something inappropriate. What did you expect when you decided you wanted to cover football?????

And on Clinton, I understand his perspective. He just didn't state it well. But he's not the sharpest knife in the drawer people (remember all those silly characters), so don't beat up on him for putting his foot in his mouth. He shouldn't have spoken on this issue without knowing the facts. But Sainz seems to be make MUCH ADOO ABOUT NOTHING!

Posted by: shelley514 | September 15, 2010 3:33 PM | Report abuse

I don't think that reporters should be allowed into NFL,NBA or any other sport locker rooms. If they want to interview athletes they can wait until the athletes have dressed and left the locker room. In terms of allowing women into locker rooms they shoud expect to be treated differently by male athletes than male reporters are treated. If I were a male athlete I would prefer to have attractive women reporters in the locker room because like a lot of men I like women. If male athletes fail to behave in a "politically correct" so be it. Makes good copy.

Posted by: jimeglrd8 | September 15, 2010 3:52 PM | Report abuse

WHAT MANNER OF CULTURED WOMAN WOULD WALK INTO A ROOM FULL OF MEN TAKING SHOWERS TO CONDUCT AN INTERVIEW. IT IS ABOUT TIME TEAM OWNERS STOP TREATING THEIR PLAYERS LIKE ANIMALS, SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY PAY THEM. THEY ARE FATHERS AND CHILDREN OF SOMEONE IN THEIR OWN RIGHTS. THEY DESERVE RESPECT AND PRIVACY. I THINK THE PLAYERS UNION SHOULD MAKE A NOTE OF THIS AT THE BARGAINING TABLE.

Posted by: JAKLAF | September 15, 2010 3:53 PM | Report abuse

Letting women into locker rooms is like letting rabbits into a python cage.

Posted by: ravitchn | September 15, 2010 3:56 PM | Report abuse

Women always want to be treated like equals. When I played a Division I sports in college we slapped each others' butts and made all sorts of comments that could be seen as "sexual harrassment". Hell, yiu could be showering and some guy would pee on your leg for a joke! Put a women there and its a law suit. Guys treat each other worse and women always claim to want to be equal. Be careful what you wish for. Equality to men is not lollipops and rainbows once you acheive it. You will be measured the same way and treated the same way. Men are NOT nice to each other. So get over yourself. Be happy you are not treated as an equal.

Posted by: mcchedds | September 15, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Women always want to be treated like equals. When I played a Division I sports in college we slapped each others' butts and made all sorts of comments that could be seen as "sexual harrassment". Hell, yiu could be showering and some guy would pee on your leg for a joke! Put a women there and its a law suit. Guys treat each other worse and women always claim to want to be equal. Be careful what you wish for. Equality to men is not lollipops and rainbows once you acheive it. You will be measured the same way and treated the same way. Men are NOT nice to each other. So get over yourself. Be happy you are not treated as an equal.

Posted by: mcchedds | September 15, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

Only 1 way to solve this IMO: all media have to hire busted (aka F-UGLY) reporters so that there will be no way that sexual innuendos can be misinterpreted in a sports locker room.

That ESPN reporter who got stalked? Whats her name? Yeah, that one. ESPN should fire her and hire a 350 lb female gorilla in her place, and when she reports from the sidelines, fans will have to suck it an d like it.

Posted by: vmrg1974 | September 15, 2010 4:02 PM | Report abuse

Dan Steinberg,

I'm very disappointed in you and this article. You have lost every ounce of integrity with writing this article because you are clearly being bias. You're trying to make seem as if people are making incorrect points, but in your effort of correcting them you leave out key facts in your argument:

You quoted a point about the WNBA having the same standards as the NBA as far as postgame interviews, but you failed to point out that this is completely unrelated to the situation at hand. We're talking about apples and oranges. As jfmam5323, pointed out the woman do their interviews fully clothed, check the link:

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=whitlock/050811

So is that really equality? When was the last time you seen a WNBA player doing an on-camera interview with just a towel on?

"I've gotten a few of these, as well. Look, say what you want about NFL cheerleaders, but their auditions often include swimsuit modeling, they wear next to nothing on the field, and a lot of men find them extremely appealing in a sexual way.

Until you can say the same thing about Kory Lichtensteiger or Casey Rabach, I'd argue this just isn't a valid comparison. I mean, unless you're really into back hair."

You're speaking from the perspective of a man, but what about the woman reporters. We don't know which men they find attractive so how do we truly know they wouldn't view this the same as we would view interviewing cheerleaders. Unless you're gay (that's your business if you are or are not), your opinion doesn't hold. Let the women come out and say that.

"NFL locker rooms are not hyper-sexualized dens of flirtation in which women stare at packages and men stare at curves and everyone's just thinking about whom to bed."

Most rational people realized that, but I think you're taking the idea out of context. Men find women attractive and vice versa. It is not unusual to see that happen in any type of environment. I'm sure it doesn't happen often, but why would you not think men and women are going to occasionally look at one another?

"I mean, on Sunday, I was interviewing Brian Orakpo when he suddenly got a cramp in his leg and gasped in pain. If he was thinking about sex just then, I'm Ines Sainz."

You're generalizing your own personal experience. So because Orakpo isn't thinking about then everybody else thinks the same way as him?

And let's put this in perspective, this woman was not getting a post game, she was getting an interview after a practice. Was it really necessary for her to sit in the locker room? Was her story going to change once Sanchez left the locker room?

Posted by: meatkins | September 15, 2010 4:05 PM | Report abuse

Everyone is blaming her and that's ridiculous. While her dress may not have been professional the athletes she was interviewing were supposed to be. The players, coaches and herself acted unprofessional. It was everyone's fault.

Posted by: rderr27 | September 15, 2010 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Oh come on now! I cannot understand why any female is allowed in a male locker room. I know of no case where men are allowed in female locker rooms. Sports interviews or otherwise. When was the last time you saw, for long, an ugly female or male interviewer and especially on a sports show? There is a reason why cheerleaders wear skimpy clothes and it is no because they cannot afford a full set of clothing. Get real!

Posted by: KBlit | September 15, 2010 4:07 PM | Report abuse

Amazing how many people make comments without a single fact.

Women in the NFL/NBA/MLB/NHL/etc. locker rooms will always be questioned. Why - we live in a sexual world.

Posted by: rlj1 | September 15, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

Female reporters in testosterone pits is not a good idea. Female reporters on the field showing some bust and butt during the game are simply using the sex angle to further their careers. All the rational is PC bull-droppings.

Posted by: observer1776 | September 15, 2010 4:16 PM | Report abuse

This stuff really brings out the knuckle-dragers, who clearly they do not engage their brains when ever given a chance to 'think' with other parts of their anatomy....

Posted by: 10bestfan | September 15, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

there is a simple way to solve this and avoid any discussions. No one is allowed in locker rooms in any sport, NHL, NBA, NFL etc...There should be a post game media area outside the locker rooms, so as players leave the locker room they can stop and speak to the media. Why do reporters have to be in the locker room? whats the point?

Posted by: Pedro01 | September 15, 2010 4:29 PM | Report abuse

Women can complain about their treatment in men's locker rooms after men have equal opportunity to interview women teams in a similar manner. Until then, shut the heck up!

Posted by: WildBill1 | September 15, 2010 4:30 PM | Report abuse

I didn't take the time to read all the comments, but I'm sure there are others who have noticed the obviously plunging neckline that the female Mexican reporter sported in several interviews, and also in the locker room.
Cincinnati's Chad Ochocinco had it right when he said "Mister,
she's a great-looking lady. I'm going to show her a LOT of respect!"
But come on, folks, this was one reporter who wanted more to
be seen than to ask questions of athletes.
Is that a sexist comment? That lady is a sexist reporter!

Posted by: miramar50 | September 15, 2010 4:42 PM | Report abuse

All I can say is it should not matter how you dress but it does and if you dress like a street walker, the guys are going to whistle. She should take lessons from our local reporter Lindsay Czarniak - she is a top sports reporter who knows how not to dress!! She is cute, and knows her football and does not have to dress like a hooker in order to cover up for what she does not know about the sport. The young woman from Mexico seems like a nice enough person but she needs to tone down her dress. She is, after all, working with males who probably have lots of male hormones in overdrive after a big game!! Just my point of view...

Posted by: OHREALLYNOW | September 15, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Frankly, these women love the attention. It gets their name out there and they become bigger stars. Sex sells no matter what aspect of it. This really should not be an issue.

Posted by: Jsuf | September 15, 2010 5:12 PM | Report abuse

I am not sure anyone has mentioned this - why not establish the Press Room Briefing - similar to Golf. When the Golf round has ended, the players are paraded before the media and drilled with questions, after questions ---- simply do the same for football - after the game, they shower, dress, and go and face the media --- that should all compromising opportunities...

Posted by: ct2k12830 | September 15, 2010 5:17 PM | Report abuse

Spot-on Dan, nicely done.

Posted by: oc_ofb | September 15, 2010 5:18 PM | Report abuse

I remember when I was an eight-year-old hockey player and me and my teammates banded together and had our coach prohibit parents from coming into the locker room between periods and for at least twenty minutes after the game.

I went on to become a NY state hs championship coach, and a great deal of my success continued to come from careful management of the locker room, including the timing of my own apopearences there.

But on the professional level, the game has been made secondary. TV timeouts, reporters talking to coaches immediately after play ends at the half or as the teams are running off the field or, in the case of FOX, interviewing managers DURING a game all signify that it's all about pr and making money.

The gender of the journalist is irrelevant; all should be directed to a press room to be opened after the game. Let the players play and coaches coach.

Posted by: rogied25 | September 15, 2010 5:39 PM | Report abuse

THIS DUMB BLOND SHOULD NOT ENTER A LOCKER ROOM FULL OF 53 NAKED MEN WEARING TIGHT JEANS AND LOW CUT BLOUSE

STUPID BIMBO

Posted by: TonyV1 | September 15, 2010 5:47 PM | Report abuse

no reporters of either sex should be allowed in the locker rooms . . . media room should be where they conduct their interviews after athletes have a chance to shower and change . . . deadlines can change to accomodate this.

Posted by: RBCrook | September 15, 2010 6:05 PM | Report abuse

This debate is so 20 years ago.

Posted by: rosepetals64 | September 15, 2010 6:06 PM | Report abuse

This is a silly story. The alleged reporter-victim is only trying to make a name for herself. Much ado about nothing. Send her to the media room.

Posted by: HMCovert | September 15, 2010 6:21 PM | Report abuse

wake me when nuclear war starts

Posted by: lambcannon | September 15, 2010 6:22 PM | Report abuse

These men are adults and professional athletes. Are we to believe they just can't control themselves? They would not have become professional athletes without incredible disipline yet they just can't contain themselves in presence of an attractive woman? Why is it unreasonable to expect grown men to behave themselves?

As Dan points out (but so many of you seemed to miss), a player does not have to be naked in front of reporters. There is time after the game to change and there are private places to change. If a player is naked or partially naked in front of reporters, it's because he chose to be.

The reason no one is interviewing naked WNBA players is because they didn't take their clothes off in an area open to the media. They could take their clothes off, stand around and do interviews in a bra and panties, or naked. But they don't. Male athletes have the same option.

When you're a professional athlete, talking to reporters is part of the job description. Reporters are in the locker room after every game. It's not as if a player walks out of the shower naked and is surprised to find reporters. They're going to be there every time.

Those are you saying there should be some sort of separate media area have obviously never covered a professional sporting event. Players will try to duck out and avoid the media. I was a sportswriter for 15 years and there were many times when I practically had to jump in front of a player to get a few questions asked. If you're not in the locker room, chances are good you're not going to get your interview. No league truly enforces it's rules about player availability.

Back at the Cap Centre, the Bullets broke the lock on the door between their locker room and the Caps' locker room so that they could leave the area via the Caps' locker room and avoid reporters.

And those of you saying there should be post game interviews are probably the same people who would complain the loudest if the stories didn't have player comments. "Why didn't this player comment?" "What did that player think he was doing?" "Why isn't s/he explaining?"

Posted by: lalalu1 | September 15, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse

Since people want to cry about locker room etiquette, the NFL should just ban all reporters from locker rooms period- problem solved.

Posted by: moebius22 | September 15, 2010 6:53 PM | Report abuse

to the crybaby who *thought* she could deal with it and did not, Hey, who baked a cake on your face ?

Makeup like that has one goal: don't say otherwise.

what's with the black-eye look, also ?

it's the old saying, "if you can't take the heat, get OUT of the kitchen".

Is it my understanding that she's asking that men not be men? In other words, turn down the heat?

That's like saying, "hey lady, take off your bewbs before approaching men".

not gonna happen, is it?

Why is it that this dumb idea has gotten ANY traction ?

Simple - women want everything.

there are limits to what will be given you, dears.

Posted by: pgibson1 | September 15, 2010 7:09 PM | Report abuse

Once again we hear the pathetic lament, "They're just doing their jobs", as if somehow that justifies everything.

So let's define "the job" as waiting patiently in the public area to scream another insipid and uninspired question to a performer who, along with the vast majority of humanity, really couldn't care less.

Posted by: beansforbob | September 15, 2010 7:14 PM | Report abuse

Women should not be allowed in the men's locker room no more than a man should be allowed in a women's.

Bottom line, end of story.

Posted by: dwdave67 | September 15, 2010 7:14 PM | Report abuse

a shame these guys can't act like men...
but what should anyone expect from a bunch of boys...

Posted by: DwightCollins | September 15, 2010 7:14 PM | Report abuse

Ten minutes .. Heck, when I played football it took that much time just to get my equipment off. You say the rules are the same for both men and women in professional sports. Mr. Steinberg, if the rules were the same, the time periods would be the same - They're not. You're playing with words.

And I suppose there can be no dress code for reporters because there's no dress code for the athletes .. right? (gotta keep it fair). I googled Ines Sainz images. Still can't figure out how she got those white pants on (unless they were painted on).

I've worked in areas where smocks were set aside for visitors (including reporters). This would be good practice for locker rooms, if for no other reason than to put all reporters on equal footing (remove some of the advantage held by reporters wearing sexually suggestive apparel who tend to have the easiest time getting choice interviews).

If the NFL was serious about reducing the number of inappropriate comments by athletes they would increase the number of minutes before reporters are allowed in the locker rooms and they would do whatever it takes to minimize the sexual element.

Posted by: kcooper35 | September 15, 2010 7:15 PM | Report abuse

Sainz has big feet.

Posted by: oracle2world | September 15, 2010 7:17 PM | Report abuse

This tamale did this on purpose, she wants to sue the NFL, kind of like that mexican women who put a human finger in her Chili that she bought at Wendys. The are schemeing women who will do anything for money, they even prostitute out their own kids. Nasty!!!!!

Posted by: highwaybluesoccer | September 15, 2010 7:17 PM | Report abuse

Keep it simple! Players who want to chat can go to the press room..all the others can go home!

Posted by: judithclaire1939 | September 15, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

My city has a NFL team and of course I am an avid fan watching all interviews local and nationally and I have never seen a locker room interviewer male or female. All interviews are done on the field after the game or outside the locker room.

I cannot understand why anyone has to be in that locker room but the players and coaches. As a guy if that was my job I would not not want to try to conduct interviews in there.

Either way there should be respect to everyone and clearly the players failed to do that.

Posted by: mac7 | September 15, 2010 7:53 PM | Report abuse

Oh please, Inez Sainz is fishing trying to boost her career and her paydays anyway she can. We are giving her just want she's begging for - attention.

Posted by: PSolver | September 15, 2010 8:00 PM | Report abuse

Do male sports reporters have access to female locker rooms?

HA! How can this be an issue when there is already a double standard with discriminating against male sports reporters covering female athletes?

New flash: Men and woman are different, have different levels of modesty, and different levels of proclivity for cat calling.

Posted by: ArlingtonMiller | September 15, 2010 8:01 PM | Report abuse

These men are adults and professional athletes. Are we to believe they just can't control themselves? They would not have become professional athletes without incredible disipline yet they just can't contain themselves in presence of an attractive woman? Why is it unreasonable to expect grown men to behave themselves?

As Dan points out (but so many of you seemed to miss), a player does not have to be naked in front of reporters. There is time after the game to change and there are private places to change. If a player is naked or partially naked in front of reporters, it's because he chose to be.

The reason no one is interviewing naked WNBA players is because they didn't take their clothes off in an area open to the media. They could take their clothes off, stand around and do interviews in a bra and panties, or naked. But they don't. Male athletes have the same option.
.....

Posted by: lalalu1 | September 15, 2010 6:41 PM | Report abuse
_______________________________________
You have your facts mixed up. Again the WNBA players aren't naked during their interviews because they do their interviews IMMEDIATELY after the game and then the reporters are kicked out. It's not the same.

And also as someone has mentioned, the football players have pads on, they have tape on, their sport is much more grueling so they may move slower, and then there is a mental time where these guys have to deal with the emotional roller coaster of games. Basketball players can just take off their clothes and hop in the shower for the most part unless they are exhausted/injured. Maybe you don't understand football, but the last time I checked it isn't the same as basketball, so the comparison again is apple and oranges.

I understand your position as a sportswriter and how players try to avoid you all, but this could be handled a lot better than rushing butt naked men for questions. The only true reason to rush in 10 minutes after a game rather than 20 or 30 minutes is just to get a story that can be sensationalized or to meet a deadline. But where is the compromise? These players deserve their privacy and their time to get themselves together. I'm not saying reporters shouldn't be able to do their job, but women shouldn't be in the locker room with these men while they have no clothes on. It is just a problem waiting to happen, especially when you have an attention-wh0re like this woman.

Posted by: meatkins | September 15, 2010 8:25 PM | Report abuse

@Meatkins

Tell me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is NFL locker rooms open up 10 minutes after the game, and WNBA locker rooms open up 10 minutes after the game. In other words, it's the same. If WNBA players choose not to shower, or are told not to shower, or whatever, it's still the same: 10 minute cool-down, then open the doors. I don't see why NFL players couldn't talk for 20 minutes, wait for the media to leave, and then shower and change, if they're really bothered by this. That seems to be what Andre Carter does.

Or, as I noted in the post, they could get changed in the private training room, as Clinton Portis evidently did last week. Or shower quickly, as Chris Cooley did.

Caron Butler would always, always shower, get dressed in the private training room, and then come address the media fully clothed. He plays the same sport as the WNBA players, and he found a way to make the rules fit his preferences. It's just not that hard.

Posted by: DanSteinberg1 | September 15, 2010 8:46 PM | Report abuse

Dan, don't be so silly.
If you were Inez Saintz, it would be different.

Why not run a whole set of Playboy Playmates through the locker room and see what happens. See how professional things are then.

Posted by: tokenwhitemale | September 15, 2010 8:58 PM | Report abuse

This is ridiculous. Leave it up to the players in question. If they're all OK with women in the locker room, great. If it makes any of them uncomfortable, then it shouldn't be allowed.

That's EXACTLY how women would be treated if a male reporter wanted to go into THEIR locker room: if the ladies are OK with it, then fine, but if any of them feel uncomfortable it wouldn't be allowed and, if it was, it would be a pretty clear-cut case of "sexual harrassment".

What's good for the goose ...

Posted by: andrew23boyle | September 15, 2010 9:20 PM | Report abuse

@Dan

As I alluded to in my most recent post, playing football is different than playing basketball. These guys have a grueling sport and they have a lot of equipment to take off. Do you think they are have time to sit down, take off all the equipment and tape, while being sore in 10 minutes? Also do you all get kicked out after a certain amount of time? If not then why would they not try to get out of their equipment as fast as possible? They aren't going to just sit there and wait until you all leave to undress. Can you imagine how uncomfortable that must be?

Yes I agree they could go into the private room, but how many of them will feel like doing that in 10 minutes and showering and getting dressed?

And again I understand about Caron, but it's still apples and oranges. The NBA is not as physically grueling as the NFL. There's no comparison and you know that more than me.

Posted by: meatkins | September 15, 2010 9:22 PM | Report abuse

Didn't we get over this in the 70's?

Any reporter who gets into a locker room made a choice that lead to them being there a long time ago.

Posted by: MHawke | September 15, 2010 9:47 PM | Report abuse

Since I have no need to be politically correct, I'll say it... How in the world are you supposed to ignore her if you are a normal male? This whole controversy is about the emasculation of men. We have been neutered by society.

Posted by: truthbeknown | September 15, 2010 9:48 PM | Report abuse

As a feminist and worked in a predominantly male profession (law), Sainz is using her " sex appeal" to get ahead in her "profession". She should dress as a Professional!! A pantsuit, a suit, slacks and a jacket, even a skirt above the knees with a blouse not showing her breast or cleavage would be the dress of a "Professional Journalist". She's using the old "sleep your way to the top". Women journalist on TV do not dress like that. Sainz in an up close and personal situation like the men's locker room should have known better, but the truth of the matter she wanted the "sexual attention".

Posted by: SHOES4ALADY | September 15, 2010 9:49 PM | Report abuse

Mr Steinberg, instead of trying to shuck us with your noble nebulousness, how about just telling it like it is:

As a reporter it's your responsibility to get into that locker room as early as possible. You're fully aware of the fact that any restrictions placed on female reporters will be placed on male reporters as well. If I were in your shoes I too would be attempting to subdue this women-in-men's-locker-room resentment, a resentment that may very well lead to a changing of the rules.

Posted by: kcooper35 | September 15, 2010 10:14 PM | Report abuse

The ugly women reporters are just jealous they don't get cat calls! Go into the locker room with a nice rack, you get noticed. Get over it.

Posted by: michael49 | September 15, 2010 10:22 PM | Report abuse

From what I read, it wasn't Saintz who first brought this up, but the other old biddies who pretend to cover sports. If you are a female and you walk into a house of ill-repute, you can be expected to be treated in a certain fashion that is different from walking into a bank or insurance office. The same goes for a locker room. If women don't like the atmosphere in the locker room, then they shouldn't go in. The same with a house of ill-repute. Yes, there are stories in both. So if you are a reporter and want the story, then just suck it up and do your job instead of moaning about male harassment.

Posted by: edwardallen54 | September 15, 2010 10:23 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Did you see the picture of that lady's butt? Day-um.

Posted by: mlincoln1 | September 15, 2010 10:50 PM | Report abuse

"if you're a shy type and you don't want to be seen naked, it's very, very easy to avoid."

But then you risk being listed up in the shy or not shy category by journalists, such as you did in this very article.

"Hey, have you heard that Andre Carter is 'shy'? Too bad. He looks like such a stud with his clothes on."

Posted by: mark16 | September 15, 2010 10:58 PM | Report abuse

Nicely done.

Posted by: SarahBB | September 15, 2010 11:17 PM | Report abuse

So now I get it Dan. You're protecting your livelihood. As a blogger you have to get fast access in the locker room because that's the advantage you have over regular print and TV media. Why didn't you just say so up front? If the Redskins fine Portis, I hope the Players Association pushes hard to change the rules of engagement in the locker room.

Posted by: jfmam5323 | September 15, 2010 11:27 PM | Report abuse

Since I have no need to be politically correct, I'll say it... How in the world are you supposed to ignore her if you are a normal male? This whole controversy is about the emasculation of men. We have been neutered by society.

Posted by: truthbeknown |

=======================================

I'll be less politically correct. How can any player regard her as a professional when even my wife says, "Would you check out her ass?"

Posted by: bbface21 | September 15, 2010 11:31 PM | Report abuse

she ask for it send her back to mexico.she like it .big deal

Posted by: SICILY | September 15, 2010 11:43 PM | Report abuse

big deal .look how she was dressed .

Posted by: SICILY | September 15, 2010 11:44 PM | Report abuse

Hey Dan, how about we get the facts a little straighter:

1. The WNBA forces media out at a certain point. The NFL lets the media stay until the last player leaves.

Yes, male players choose to get naked, but what is the other option? Are they supposed to leave with their gear on and take the bus-ride home without a shower (against all medical advice)? Please explain.

2. When teams close the locker rooms "significantly" longer than ten minutes -- are they not violating NFL policy? Can they be fined for that?

3. What does Andre Carter do when some of the reporters decide to stay until the last player leaves, as the NFL allows them to do?

4. What does Clinton Portis do in a locker room whos layout does not permit him the luxury of keeping out of view?

5. Do all locker rooms have an out of view area where the players can shower and walk from the showers to the towels? I know that's not the case in your cherry-picked examples, but is it the case in some locker rooms?

alterdox.blogspot.com

Posted by: alterdox | September 16, 2010 10:58 AM | Report abuse

"No one has enough time to waste standing around and waiting for someone to get dressed."

It's kind of sad that the media believe their time is worth more than player's privacy. I wonder if they would feel that way if the public (male and female) walked into their changing area at the gym, saying they didn't have time to wait for their story to print.

"So if you're a shy type and you don't want to be seen naked, it's very, very easy to avoid."

Your company/organization shouldn't be putting you in a position to have to "avoid" being seen changing. If any other company did this, the ACLU would be all over them.

"All our reporters had to file stories within 30 seconds of the final whistle, run down to the locker room, and then refile as quickly as possible to have any chance of getting post-game quotes into a few hundred thousand papers."

Sounds like an issue with the media organization. Too bad. If privacy is an inconvenience, our media appears to be the first to justify violating it. Weird.

"But players have places to go, and they're in a hurry, and we have deadlines, and we're in a hurry,"

Again, sounds like a media issue. All these women coming out to trash on the Jets about the situation. Hmmm...To avoid it, just keep the media out of the locker room. Too bad. Your story will be 15 minutes later. Personal privacy should be a right in any profession. You shouldn't have to do something special to have privacy while changing.

"After NFL games, there is a 10-minute cooling off period, during which the locker room is closed to the media."

Really? 10 minutes? Try taking off all of your equipment in 10 minutes. WNBA has 20 minutes and they don't even wear pads.

The NFL needs to take a stand, or they should be sued by the players on grounds of privacy violation. How much money do they make? Can't afford a "Media room" for the questions/answers? Have to be in the locker room? Seriously, the whole issue stems from the NFL looking for this type of issue. It never was one before female reporters were in the locker room was it? When was the last time you saw a male reporter come into the locker room with a speedo on? You think the players would be silent about it?

Two things and this goes away for good:

1. Dress code for players and media who desire an interview.
2. A specific media area where players and media interact... OUTSIDE of the locker room.

If you don't have time to wait, too bad. Goodell...pay attention. Either you make rules that allow privacy, or this crap will continue...pushed by the media and special interest.


Posted by: Objectivity3 | September 16, 2010 4:23 PM | Report abuse

"But but but!!!!!"

Yes- that's all I think about when Sainz is mentioned.

Posted by: bretb | September 16, 2010 6:19 PM | Report abuse

"These men are adults and professional athletes. Are we to believe they just can't control themselves?" Hmmm...OK, then I feel men should be able to go into the women's bathroom to discuss things with their women co-workers. They shouldn't be upset or yell at them, even if they look like Fabio...they should just be able to control themselves.


"As Dan points out (but so many of you seemed to miss), a player does not have to be naked in front of reporters." Hmmm... it is unfortunate they only get 10 minutes to get all of their equipment off, get showered and get dressed. After that 10 minutes, the media NEVER leaves. Yeah, that's a choice.

The reason no one is interviewing naked WNBA players is because they didn't take their clothes off in an area open to the media. They could take their clothes off, stand around and do interviews in a bra and panties, or naked. But they don't. Male athletes have the same option."

NO THEY DON'T! The media is forced to LEAVE at some point and the women have that opportunity. They don't LEAVE in the NFL. How long should the player sit there in his equipment so you can stand on your soapbox and express your ignorance?

Posted by: Objectivity3 | September 16, 2010 6:53 PM | Report abuse

I have never understood why anyone, man or woman would want to enter the locker room! What is wrong with waiting outside?

Posted by: blind95 | September 20, 2010 7:06 PM | Report abuse

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