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Redskins third in the NFL in online buzz


(By Jonathan Newton - TWP)


Different research groups keep finding out different ways to measure the Redskins' popularity, and I'll keep mentioning them.

Last year, you might recall, a Harris Interactive poll reported that the Redskins were 17th in nationwide popularity, though there were plenty of things to question about the study, which asked respondents to list their two favorite NFL teams. There was also a list of primetime NFL viewership since 2006, in which the Redskins ranked ninth.

Earlier this month, the media research firm Nielsen Co. published its own study ranking NFL teams on media and Internet exposure. There were four categories -- gross audience during nationally televised games, local TV ratings, monthly unique audience to the team web site and total online buzz volume.

(According to Nielsen, "Teams in each category were assigned a score, with the top rank worth 100 points and each subsequent ranking assigned a lower weighted score based its distance from the top. Final team rankings were calculated using the sum of scores across all four categories.")

The Cowboys finished first overall, ahead of the Steelers and Giants. The Redskins ranked 11th overall and last in the NFC East. (The Eagles were seventh.)

But the Redskins shot near the top of the list in the online buzz category, which might be of interest to the blogging types desperate for traffic. In fact, the Skins were third in online buzz, behind only the Giants and Cowboys. The Redskins were also 12th in average monthly visitors to their Web site, 14th in total national TV audience, and a surprising 21st in the local TV ratings.

(Though on second thought, the larger the market, the harder it is to get a great local TV rating, which is why New Orleans, Pittsburgh and Green Bay were all near the top of that list.)

Then comes the recent Washington City Paper/Kojo Nnamdi Show poll of D.C. democrats. The purpose was to track the mayoral primary, but they also got a whole bunch of other data as long as they were asking, including stuff about the favorite football team of D.C. Dems. Forty-eight percent identified the Redskins and 25 percent chose another team, with six percent saying the Cowboys. According to City Paper, 60 percent of black respondents said the Redskins were their favorite team, while only 32 percent of white people surveyed did the same.

(Nielsen link via the Wall Street Journal.)

By Dan Steinberg  | September 21, 2010; 12:39 PM ET
Categories:  Media, Redskins  
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Next: Redskins eighth in Fan Cost Index

Comments

Don't tell Wilbon - he thinks the Redskins are irrelevant nationally. Even with Shanahan, McNabb, Portis and gold pants.

Posted by: Kev29 | September 21, 2010 12:45 PM | Report abuse

The study was done in 2009 - perhaps the low point in team history concerning fan apathy. It's not out of question that the Skins could jump up a few spots with even a decent season. Local and national ratings would increase, for sure.

Posted by: ttassa | September 21, 2010 2:49 PM | Report abuse

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