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Nats giving away an Adam Dunn jersey



Couple of ways you could go on this one. One online writer is using the promise of a game-worn Adam Dunn jersey to speculate that possibly the Nats are getting ready to re-sign the first baseman.

Of course, Thomas Boswell would argue otherwise. Here's from his chat last week:

Like I told you a month ago, he's gone. The Nats played the whole thing like amateurs for months, then in recent weeks started changing their minds, then rechanging them, then re-re-rechanging them. A dozen things would have to fall in place for the Nats to get Dunn back, including, imo, the Cubs not offering him a four-year deal to come hit in the ballpark he loves best. I'd be glad to be wrong. I'm not.

Reader Aaron puts this together with the pumpkin offer, and writes that "basically, the club is giving away a jersey of a soon-former player that has a soon-obsolete design."

That would not qualify as an awesome prize. Either way, here are more Nats pumpkins, and you really ought to check out the Let Teddy Win pumpkin.

By Dan Steinberg  | October 27, 2010; 4:04 PM ET
Categories:  Nats  
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Next: John Wall at the Caps game

Comments

1. Boz is teh awesome, especially when practicing Gibbsology.

2. The Dunn jersey will have value as a rarity one way or another. (I'm banking on my Sergei Fedorov-signed Capitals puck to finance a significant chunk of my retirement.)

Posted by: Hendo1 | October 27, 2010 4:15 PM | Report abuse

Well if Bleacher Report says it...

Posted by: doubleuefwhy | October 27, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

"Of course, Thomas Boswell would argue otherwise. Here's from his chat last week:

Like I told you a month ago, he's gone. The Nats played the whole thing like amateurs for months, then in recent weeks started changing their minds, then rechanging them, then re-re-rechanging them. A dozen things would have to fall in place for the Nats to get Dunn back, including, imo, the Cubs not offering him a four-year deal to come hit in the ballpark he loves best. I'd be glad to be wrong. I'm not."

Of course, in this morning's column Thomas Boswell totally changed his tune on the Adam Dunn situation. Turned it around 180 degrees. Cuz that's how Thomas Boswell rolls.

"A common thread that runs through all these teams that have jumped from oblivion to 90-or-more wins is that none spent huge sums on free agent sluggers. If you wonder why the Nats are reluctant to give $13 million a year or more to re-sign a home run machine like Adam Dunn, look at the Rangers and Giants. Both are full of hitters who play important roles at a fraction that cost.

Vlad Guerrero, Aubrey Huff, Ian Kinsler, Cody Ross, Jeff Francoeur and others all make between $3 million and $6.5 million a year. Pat Burrell signed as a minor league free agent just to play, even though former employers were handing him $9 million this season.

Landing a 40-homer man is expensive. But NLCS hero Juan Uribe quietly hit 24 homers this year for $3.25 million.

So, we see a clear pattern. Give mega-deals to the players you've developed yourself who have become face-of-the-franchise types, like the Rangers gave to six-time all-star Michael Young and the Giants to two-time Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum."

Posted by: FeelWood | October 27, 2010 4:36 PM | Report abuse

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