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Posted at 1:27 PM ET, 11/17/2010

Marion Barry begins stint as 'national advocate' for welfare reform on Fox Business

By Mike DeBonis

D.C. Council member Marion Barry (D-Ward 8) announced yesterday that he planned to become a "national advocate" for welfare reform -- rekindling an issue dear to conservatives that's been pretty much settled as a national issue for 15 years.

How's that going, council member?

Barry appeared today on the Fox Business Network, where he spoke to host Stuart Varney.

"Are you the best person to do this?" asked Varney. "With all due respect, your honor, you disgraced yourself in office and everybody knows it. ... I put it to you, sir: You're not the best example. You're not the best leader in this situation."

"That's your view about it," Barry replied. "The FBI, 20 years ago, set me up, entrapped me. ... That's all behind us now."

By Mike DeBonis  | November 17, 2010; 1:27 PM ET
Categories:  Marion Barry, The District  
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Comments

The Washington Post owes Marion Barry for a Lifetime of news reporting. I am still enjoying stories over the last 30 years.
Go Marion Barry!

Posted by: *Futurejumps | November 17, 2010 6:49 PM | Report abuse

I do not use the race card very often but I do not understand why it is not apparent to people that Barry's view is not a conversion at all.


Welfare is designed to be a temporary means to an end. A bridge through hard times---not a life's plan. Those on welfare with the capacity to work should work--and over time they can be given skills to become full time employed. To do anything less is not only a disservice to the taxpayer but to the recipient and their families.

There is a great mind receiving that check. And you cannot call welfare recipients lazy either. They wake up earlier than we do, stand on lines for hours, read through system manuals and hustle for their existence. They are expending their efforts in an unproductive means for them and society. We must expect more. And they should ask for more--a methods for a life change.


Posted by: CultureClub | November 24, 2010 12:40 PM | Report abuse

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