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Elderly man wanders on Metro tracks

An elderly man wanderedtyson.gif onto the tracks between Ballston and Virginia Square stations on the Orange Line at about 10:30 Friday morning, forcing trains to slow down until a train operator spotted the man and picked him up, according to Metro.

"Trains were told to operate at reduced speed in that area," said Metro spokesman Steven Taubenkibel. "A train operator saw the individual on the track, stopped the train, opened the door to the lead car and helped him onto the train," Taubenkibel said.

The man was taken to Virginia Square Station where he was met by Metro Transit Police to be interviewed and transported to a medical facility.

"He will be taken to a local hospital for observation," Taubenkibel said.

-- Ann Scott Tyson

By Michael Bolden  | July 23, 2010; 11:37 AM ET
Categories:  Maryland, Metro, Orange Line  
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Comments

How did that happen? Geesh.

Posted by: lulu202 | July 23, 2010 12:25 PM | Report abuse

Metro employees were too busy watching satellite tv and drinking "coffee" to see how he got there or where he went.

Posted by: jiji1 | July 23, 2010 12:31 PM | Report abuse

Dr, Gridlock,

It's so clear to me and anyone else who have seen repairs being done on the escalators that there is a consistant observation. There seems to be a boom box in just about every repair site. I'm convinced that if they would be removed the escalator problems would be solved.

Jim Onder
Kensington, Maryland
jimonder@gmail.com
(301) 367-7023

Posted by: jimonder | July 23, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

I'm not going to blame Metro for an old man wandering onto the tracks. At least it happened after rush hour was over.

Posted by: 1995hoo | July 23, 2010 1:55 PM | Report abuse

Jim Onder is right! The boomboxes are the problem! Down with boomboxes!

Posted by: HappyMan85 | July 23, 2010 2:04 PM | Report abuse

listening to music in the work place is a problem, then it should be band at everywhere no ipods, radio or streaming on a computer... the boomboxs are not the problem it is the proper maintenance and scheduling overhauling of the equipment as it ages.

Posted by: markeverline | July 23, 2010 3:28 PM | Report abuse

Given the significant height difference between the platform and the tracks, how does a feeble old man "wander" down to them without a single Metro employee noticing?

Posted by: jiji1 | July 23, 2010 3:56 PM | Report abuse

jiji1 wrote:
"Given the significant height difference between the platform and the tracks, how does a feeble old man "wander" down to them without a single Metro employee noticing?"

It is very easy to do. You apparently have never bother to look around the train platform. There is a gate at each end of the platform that allows a person to go down to the track level. The gates are not locked. There is a sign on the gate warning people not to enter the gate. There are usually no Metro employess stationed on the platforms and I don't know of a single station where the person in the kiosk can see both gates.
You can't blame Metro for every act done by someone.


Posted by: Jimof1913 | July 23, 2010 4:49 PM | Report abuse

Kudos to the train operator who safely stopped the train and came to the man's aid. Great job, employee!

Posted by: kersl | July 23, 2010 5:14 PM | Report abuse

Oh, puh-leeze. Metro employees should be held accountable for A LOT of things.

But they should not be held accountable for every crazed, drunk and demented idiot that wanders onto the tracks.

Posted by: checkered1 | July 23, 2010 7:46 PM | Report abuse

Metro is the best at redefining laziness.

Posted by: fireball72 | July 24, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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